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So I figured, in light of the recent video that was posted about the Ninja 300 Crash in the twisties this week, to tell people about my stupidity on a ride today. Basically everything happened because of my need to go past my abilities. Thankfully I did not crash, but had I gone any harder, it would have been a different story.

First mistake, trying to beat a light: I decided i wanted to not get stuck behind it and opened up the throttle to get to the intersection as fast as possible. As I approached it, I decided to start braking, but was a little late on when I should have started. I applied too much pressure on the foot brake and ultimately ended up locking the real wheel up and then quickly let go of the rear brake to free it up.

STUPID MISTAKE

The other side of the intersection was slightly diagonal and required some light turning. Luckily I was only going about 15-20 mph by the time it happened but, had I been going any faster, the possibility of bad crash (possible high side) definitely would have existed. Thankfully, made it without incident.

2nd mistake, lack of target fixation: I decided to take a turn on a two-wide turning lane too fast and did not look at where I was turning. Instead my focus was straight ahead only looking at where I wanted to go with my eyes. I went wide and had to slow down and missed hitting the side by inches (even threw my foot on the ground to try and stabilize myself). I did this twice actually, can't remember where the other one was, but it was basically the same issue, LACK OF TARGET FIXATION and NOT TURNING MY HEAD TO LOOK WHERE I WANTED TO GO.

Soooo, i wanted to share this with everyone, especially considering how many new riders there are on this forum. I learned a lot from today and will definitely be taking it easier until i'm ready. It should also be noted that the temperature was a cool 39 degrees and it probably didn't help that I had cold tires for most of the time.
 

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"Target Fixation" is actually considered bad. The lack of target fixation is actually a good thing. Target fixation is seeing something in the road, and starring it down - therefore, your mind kind of forces you towards the object or obstacle, rather than away.

You do have to look at where you want to go. Look through the turn. Just watch MotoGP/Moto2/Moto3/WSBK/BSB..etc

At a certain temperature, the road will be too cold for the tires to ever heat up properly, which will lead to a more dangerous ride (You must be more careful)
 
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I went riding with 2 mates who are expirienced road bike riders, one on a GSX1000R and the other on an Aprillia RSV4, and it took everything I had to not try and keep up with them on my 4th ride, on a little 300. After watching some of these crash videos and reading a few of these close call stories, I think my self control will be a lot better next time!!
 

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As riding improves those close calls and miss-steps should become rare. Newer riders is where most accidents occur, until you get the hang of things. Unfortunately, you almost have to make little mistakes to learn how not to do them in some circumstances. There is just a ton of stuff that can go wrong and the 300 is one of the best bikes for learning. Practice, practice, practice. Hopefully, when you are riding beyond your abilities or about to, like you noted, there is a little voice that tells you to slow down and back off. When in doubt, be correct as they say in the military.
 

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Time for you to attend a ARS (Advanced Riding School) course. Track days have improved EVERY aspect of my riding skills.
I rode for 31 years before finally getting to the track, and un-learning all of my bad habits.
 

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But look at the bright side! Despite the stupid actions you realized your mistakes and even better you are ok and nothing happened, you only learned a lesson. I've been riding for a little less than a month and I've learnt SO MUCH. I don't speed or anything through traffic because I've already seen what can happen. Just take your time and ride safely. With time and practice you will notice the improvement in turning, braking, cornering, and riding all together. Things become much more natural and fluid rather than acting on thought.

But always, always, ride safely and within your limitation.
 

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Good on you mate for being able to identify and criticise your own mistakes. It's a rare ability, most people are too arrogant to do it, but it's probably one of the best traits I think you can develop as a rider.
I'm only new to riding but over the last few weeks I've noticed how much more easily I can make the bike turn and respond to my inputs, and by taking a moment after each ride to reflect, I'm identifying areas to improve. It sounds like you're doing the same and I commend you. Personally I still have trouble changing direction on two-lane roundabouts, when I'm in either lane I seem to run wide. I'm working on it but usually I just slow down more to avoid it. It would be good to see a thread dedicated to mistakes like this (unless there already is one) as I know it's not just the rookies who slip up occasionally, and some community input is never (usually) too bad a thing.
Cheers


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Good on you mate for being able to identify and criticise your own mistakes. It's a rare ability, most people are too arrogant to do it, it's probably one of the best traits I think you can develop as a rider.

I'm a new rider and I still have trouble changing direction on double lane roundabouts. Usually I have to slow right down to the point of being tailgated by some minkie in landcruiser just to avoid running wide. I'm working on it though and over the last few weeks I'm amazed at how much better my riding feels and how much swifter the bike responds to my inputs. Maybe there should be a thread dedicated to these sort of mistakes (however small they are). Unless of course there is one in which case my bad search bar is all the way up there...
But hey, community support isn't always a bad thing right?
Cheers


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Good on you mate for being able to identify and criticise your own mistakes. It's a rare ability, most people are too arrogant to do it, it's probably one of the best traits I think you can develop as a rider.

I'm a new rider and I still have trouble changing direction on double lane roundabouts. Usually I have to slow right down to the point of being tailgated by some minkie in landcruiser just to avoid running wide. I'm working on it though and over the last few weeks I'm amazed at how much better my riding feels and how much swifter the bike responds to my inputs. Maybe there should be a thread dedicated to these sort of mistakes (however small they are). Unless of course there is one in which case my bad search bar is all the way up there...
But hey, community support isn't always a bad thing right?
Cheers
 

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One thing that has helped me is riding my bicycle around my neighborhoods, you feel vulnerable on it and its the same thing as a motorcycle. as a bicycle you always feel like no one sees you, and just act the same on the motorcycle.

Another thing that helps is act like you are the size of a car, dont be lane splitting and taking corners super fast just because the bike will do it. Dont take off like a drag racer or go fast just because the bike has the power either.

Stay safe and wear your gear guys! and as always have fun!
 

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As riding improves those close calls and miss-steps should become rare. Newer riders is where most accidents occur, until you get the hang of things. Unfortunately, you almost have to make little mistakes to learn how not to do them in some circumstances. There is just a ton of stuff that can go wrong and the 300 is one of the best bikes for learning. Practice, practice, practice. Hopefully, when you are riding beyond your abilities or about to, like you noted, there is a little voice that tells you to slow down and back off. When in doubt, be correct as they say in the military.
That's my issue; people at work were saying I didn't have enough experience to ride to work yet...

So how is one supposed to gain experience without experiencing the moment?

It's the riding equivalent of must have this many years experience to apply yet if no one hires you you'll never get the experience

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Wow man, what was so important to get you riding like that?
2nded.

Try to avoid the feeling of having to push, i.e. because you're late or want to get some where faster. Just leave earlier so you can take your time on the road. Haste is your worst enemy on the bike :)

Definitely look where you want to go; not at what you wish to avoid.
 
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