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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, took my 300 in for service a week ago and the mechanic said I should be using WD-40 on the upper part of the fork legs as I store it outside and there was some buildup on the legs.

Has anyone ever heard of a need to do this? He suggested doing it weekly and warned of the buildup impacting braking to the point where the brakes would not work anymore.

I didn't fully understand what he meant, but shouldn't the fork seals be protecting against any buildup on the brake pads? Is this something that any of you do regularly?
 

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what...

The forks and brakes are completely independent. How the hell does spraying your forks with WD-40 prevent your brakes from rusting? lol

Also, it is 100% normal for brake rotors to rust. The rust will be cleared off when you use the brakes as you ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah that was my reaction too. I ride pretty much everyday and he only said it was an issue since I store my bike outside.

Maybe time to find a different shop, same place told me to keep my hands on the bars to avoid a bad head shake. I replaced the tires and shake is gone.
 

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Hey, took my 300 in for service a week ago and the mechanic said I should be using WD-40 on the upper part of the fork legs as I store it outside and there was some buildup on the legs.

Has anyone ever heard of a need to do this? He suggested doing it weekly and warned of the buildup impacting braking to the point where the brakes would not work anymore.

I didn't fully understand what he meant, but shouldn't the fork seals be protecting against any buildup on the brake pads? Is this something that any of you do regularly?
Bs. Dont apply anything at all to your rotors. Wipe the forks w a clean microfiber cloth. I clean my forks w the same product I shine the bike with, Honda polish spray.

I think it is important to keep the forks clean where they go in n out. But, wd40 will probably damage the seals.



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And make sure you armor-all your seat and hand grips too so they dont fade. :happy:

Seriously, dont let that dealer touch your bike hey.
 

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I think this is all being taken out of context. From what it sounds like to me, he's saying to keep the upper forks clean in order to keep the seal in good condition as blowing a seal WILL adversely affect braking as it will cause the front to bottom out and if there is still energy will transfer right back into the wheel and destabilize the bike and put undo force on the contact patch and potentially cause the front wheel to lose traction. Overall, keeping your forks clean and smooth will keep the seals in good order and by extension, allow your braking to remain relatively stable and predictable. Although personally, I wouldn't use WD-40 for it as it's specialty is penetration and displacement of water or incompatible fluids. I'm not too sure how compatible the fluids within the shocks are with WD-40 and would really not want to chance having that fluid forced past the seals due to interaction with the WD-40. Just keep the forks wiped clean and ensure there aren't any burrs or nicks that could grab the seal and tear it. It's not rocket science.

I didn't see anywhere within the OPs post where the tech told him to apply it directly to the rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think this is all being taken out of context. From what it sounds like to me, he's saying to keep the upper forks clean in order to keep the seal in good condition as blowing a seal WILL adversely affect braking as it will cause the front to bottom out and if there is still energy will transfer right back into the wheel and destabilize the bike and put undo force on the contact patch and potentially cause the front wheel to lose traction. Overall, keeping your forks clean and smooth will keep the seals in good order and by extension, allow your braking to remain relatively stable and predictable. Although personally, I wouldn't use WD-40 for it as it's specialty is penetration and displacement of water or incompatible fluids. I'm not too sure how compatible the fluids within the shocks are with WD-40 and would really not want to chance having that fluid forced past the seals due to interaction with the WD-40. Just keep the forks wiped clean and ensure there aren't any burrs or nicks that could grab the seal and tear it. It's not rocket science.

I didn't see anywhere within the OPs post where the tech told him to apply it directly to the rotors.
Correct, he was just saying to keep them clean, sorry if that was confusing.

I think I will just regularly wipe them down with a cloth and not use WD-40 as from what I've heard it can be corrosive.
 

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Correct, he was just saying to keep them clean, sorry if that was confusing.

I think I will just regularly wipe them down with a cloth and not use WD-40 as from what I've heard it can be corrosive.
it's not necessarily corrosive, but it can leave a sticky film behind which is a dirt and dust attractant which is absolutely what you DON'T want on your forks.
 

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keeping the top of the fork legs clean is a great idea. motorcycle manufacturers discovered this years ago and in the 60's / 70's and earlier went nuts with "fork gators"

one of the big killers of fork seals believe it or not is dead insects.they go as hard as a rock hit a decent bump and they get jammed into the rubber seal, get enough of this and the seal perishes.


fork gators can look like this



and when fitted to a fork leg look like this



great idea.

unfortunately when the oil is running out from under the gator and down the leg the seal is well and truly shagged by this stage and your going to have to do some maintenance on your bike.

but fork seals are a piece of cake to replace, so long as you have the right tools, some patience and the parts on hand **before** you rip the bike to shreads
 
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