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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which make / type of tire would be best to replace the stock tires for every day (non track) riding?

I'm primarily looking for wider tires (particularly the rear, so a 150 would be biggest I could go, right?) with more grip than the stock ones, but they should have the same level of sipes for the occasional wet ride and last as long (i.e. not burn up as quickly as track tires).

Also, since these will replace my stock ones completely, not just serve as an alternate set, should I plan on being able to swap them myself, or take it to a shop? In which case would anyone have a rough idea of the cost for a tire swap?

I know that's a lot of questions, but I really appreciate all your help!
 

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Whats wrong with the the stock tires for daily riding.. I ride in all weather and see no issues with them.. They work good in all conditions I have took the bike in..

As for the actual swap.. Do you know have the tool and know how to change tires and balance them? If not you will need to take it in.. My cycle gear charges $25ish I believe for a mount and balance I believe.. That is ONLY if you dismount the wheel and bring it to them.. If they have to take it off the bike for you I have no idea what that costs but its probably cheaper just to buy your own stands at that point..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Whats wrong with the the stock tires for daily riding.. I ride in all weather and see no issues with them.. They work good in all conditions I have took the bike in..

As for the actual swap.. Do you know have the tool and know how to change tires and balance them? If not you will need to take it in.. My cycle gear charges $25ish I believe for a mount and balance I believe.. That is ONLY if you dismount the wheel and bring it to them.. If they have to take it off the bike for you I have no idea what that costs but its probably cheaper just to buy your own stands at that point..
I'm really looking for the more aggressive look a wider tire brings, not to mention I'm sure there is at least some stopping power to be gained by having a wider tire.

I have stands and have a general idea of how to balance tires, but not remove them. So I'll probably just take it in for them to swap it and properly balance it.

Any chance a wider tire (like a 150) would interfere with the rear end? Exhaust bracket, swingarm, etc.
 

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+1 regarding what cbzdel says, the stock tires are perfect for daily riding, no reason to replace them. Also the bike is designed for that size tire, putting any other size will degrade the performance. And my shop charges $120 to change a set of tires (on the bike)
 
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putting any other size will degrade the performance.
I wish people would stop quoting this nonsense. If putting a wider tire on the bike could ONLY degrade the performance, they wouldn't put bigger tires on bigger bikes (and no offense to you personally, wetwork, but people who keep saying this generally are just parroting something they heard once and didn't really understand.)

Bigger tires allow for greater lean angles with heavier bikes due to the larger contact patch but you sacrifice the ease with which you are able to initiate that lean. The reason you should recommend against larger tires is that a small, light bike like the 300 doesn't really need the larger contact patch, so why sacrifice its main attraction, its maneuverability?

Now, getting back on topic: If all you are looking to do in change the aesthetics, then sure, go for it; just be aware of the consequences. General recommendations are that you only go up one size in section, but you could probably fit something even wider with some "ballooning" (can't think of the right term right now) of the sidewalls, which isn't exactly desirable. Based on anecdotal evidence from another forum member, going from a 140 to a 150 on the rear will be basically unnoticeable in terms of lean, so that's probably a pretty safe bet.
 

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If you're after better tyres than look at compounds before changing sizes in my opinion. If you're after looks than be aware of negative changes. It has been commented that one size up will fit front and rear but doesn't equal better performance on its own. Again look at compounds.
P.s. Search helps.
 

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So 160/60/17 would fit with the stock swingarm and rim correct?
I don't need the speech that it will effect the bike turning and what not i know it will! I mainly do highway everyday and the 140 doesn't feel good on highway i jump around. the wider i could go without having to replace the swing arm would be great! thanks so much for your help!
 

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Which make / type of tire would be best to replace the stock tires for every day (non track) riding?

I'm primarily looking for wider tires (particularly the rear, so a 150 would be biggest I could go, right?) with more grip than the stock ones, but they should have the same level of sipes for the occasional wet ride and last as long (i.e. not burn up as quickly as track tires).

Also, since these will replace my stock ones completely, not just serve as an alternate set, should I plan on being able to swap them myself, or take it to a shop? In which case would anyone have a rough idea of the cost for a tire swap?

I know that's a lot of questions, but I really appreciate all your help!
I think you're better off sticking with stock sizes. Won't you actually lose grip with a wider tire since it won't be ideal for the size of the 300's wheel? You may end up with less grip. You'll certainly compromise handling a bit, or maybe a lot.

Stock sizes grip fine for the light 300, and the 300 doesn't put enough power down to need more tire. Instead, maybe get some better tires such as the Diablo Rosso II by Pirelli, assuming you're still on the stock tires.
 
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Imo, for commuting, stock tires are best but bigger tire for aesthetics. You know what would make a bigger tire not so aesthetically pleasing. A big ass chicken strip. I hate my chicken strips. LOL

Space. You won't lose grip with bigger tire, you get more grip due to more contact patch. That is why some 600 racers run 190/55 rather than 180/55. That is also why the Dunlop Unbeaten rear, which was developed for the 250 racers in Japan, is 150/60 and not 140.
 

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I thought the 120 front makes the steering slower but not much. 120 felt stable but leans a little slower. 110 goes in the lean faster. I went back to 110 simply because the bike felt faster. The 150 back is perfect. The back feels more resistant to swaying from the wind. The cornering on the 150 feels good. The back still looks like a bicycle, 150 doesnt really does much to the aesthetics. I would do 160 rear if i can get a better swing arm, a bigger rear wheel, and if my hp is over 40. I dont feel safe having 160 rear when the stock wheel is barely holding a 160 tire in and the treads from the tires arent contacting the pavement like it was engineer to - the pitch of the 160 rear on the stock 300 rear wheel seems off and unsafe

I tested 110/140 stock vs 120/150 vs 110/150 current. 110/150 is good.
 

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+1 regarding what cbzdel says, the stock tires are perfect for daily riding, no reason to replace them. Also the bike is designed for that size tire, putting any other size will degrade the performance. And my shop charges $120 to change a set of tires (on the bike)
That's kinda high. I pay like $35 a tire, on the bike.
 

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If you just want looks then go wider. I will say that the Pirelli Rosso II tires have a narrow looking profile so this might not be the best for looks.

Bridgestone has some 150 size tires (BT-016 maybe) that have a rounder profile which should give the larger more aggresive look.

That said, you are going to get just as much grip, traction, and lean angle out of the 140 as you will out of the 150. The 150 will also be a heavier tire which isn't a positive for a low HP bike (but you probably won't notice). So going larger in size isn't going to give much benefit other than looks.
 

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Whats wrong with the the stock tires?
Exactly, I don't understand why people buy a nimble bike and want bigger tires. Just stick to the stock sizes on the 300. When I bought my DR2's, I bought stock sizes, and was very happy.
 

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Exactly, I don't understand why people buy a nimble bike and want bigger tires. Just stick to the stock sizes on the 300. When I bought my DR2's, I bought stock sizes, and was very happy.
I understand it. It's because they want to look like their riding a big bike, but still ride a cheap beginner/intermediate bike that gets good mileage.

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I understand it. It's because they want to look like their riding a big bike, but still ride a cheap beginner/intermediate bike that gets good mileage.
Bigger tires on the 300 defeat one of the major purposes of owning and riding a 300.
 

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Have you ever looked at the Dunlop 211GPA 190/55 next to a a street tire 180/55? The profile of a race tire is so different than a street tire that you can't really compare them when it comes to tire sizes. But the GPA 190 is designed to fit on a 5.5 inch rim. And I am sure that the Dunlop Unbeaten for in 150/60 is designed for a 3.5-4" rimsince that is what a Ninja250 has.

Whereas most 150 street tires are designed to fit on a 4.5 inch rim. Putting a 150 on a 4" rim probably isn't going to make a difference that most riders can notice. But putting a tire too wide for a rim will pinch the tire a little and not give the optimum profile of the tire design.


Imo, for commuting, stock tires are best but bigger tire for aesthetics. You know what would make a bigger tire not so aesthetically pleasing. A big ass chicken strip. I hate my chicken strips. LOL

Space. You won't lose grip with bigger tire, you get more grip due to more contact patch. That is why some 600 racers run 190/55 rather than 180/55. That is also why the Dunlop Unbeaten rear, which was developed for the 250 racers in Japan, is 150/60 and not 140.
 

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Yes, I have looked at the profile of the Dunlop 211 and in fact, raced with them. To me, they felt more planted on the corners than the Dunlop 209gpa or Pirelli Supercorsa, I was 3 seconds faster on the 211 190/55. But this is track talk.

What is too wide? Well, I'm running Battlax S20 "Street tires", 150/60, rear and I have no problems with them on the canyons and the track.

Have you ever looked at the Dunlop 211GPA 190/55 next to a a street tire 180/55? The profile of a race tire is so different than a street tire that you can't really compare them when it comes to tire sizes. But the GPA 190 is designed to fit on a 5.5 inch rim. And I am sure that the Dunlop Unbeaten for in 150/60 is designed for a 3.5-4" rimsince that is what a Ninja250 has.

Whereas most 150 street tires are designed to fit on a 4.5 inch rim. Putting a 150 on a 4" rim probably isn't going to make a difference that most riders can notice. But putting a tire too wide for a rim will pinch the tire a little and not give the optimum profile of the tire design.
 
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