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Sparky, you asked for some thoughts from experienced riders.

I am 65, my first bike at age 18 was a Kawasaki H2 750 triple 2-stroke, the original “widow-maker”, absolute fastest bike at the time. Every bike since has been a 1000cc sport bike. I have owned Kawi’s, Suzukis, Yamahas, Honda’s, Ducati’s, etc. I currently have a 2005 ZX-10R (1st Gen, also appropriately was called the “widow maker”), and GSXS-1000 naked, and now as well a 2014 N300.

I was #1 Plate AFM California Open Superbike Champion and then raced National AMA Super Bike for three years in the early 80s.

I have crashed many times, done unbelievably stupid shit on the street, I am lucky to be alive today. With older age comes less desire to feel the pain of skin against asphalt and the ensuing recovery time of broken bones. Oh - not to mention the pain of seeing your bike mangled and the downtime and cost of repairs.

But I still do and always have loved power and brutal acceleration. I love to do power wheelies

Four thoughts come to mind if you are asking for advise …..

1) Never, ever, EVER ride without a helmet, even if you’re just going to the corner store.
2) Only open up the throttle wide open if you can see far into the distance and you know there are no side streets ahead
3) If you are wondering what the idiot in that car is going to do, always assume he WILL do it
4) If you catch yourself daydreaming while riding (thinking about other shit) slap yourself and focus on the road ahead and all your surroundings. You must always concentrate 100% and focus, constantly scanning left, right, behind, ahead. Riding is like being in a video game and everything around you is trying to get you, FOCUS and CONCENTRATE always.
 

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How do you learn the things you ask above? Time. Hours on the seat. When I was 18, I used to take my bike into the local Southern California mountains every day after school and ride the twisties. I was consumed with my bike. I think it just takes “flight time”, like a pilot logging thousands of hours flying. And of course, getting on a track is the safest place to go fast.

do you have any good roads nearby to ride with not too much traffic? Practice!

you mentioned rear wheel spin, are you a light person? That doesn’t sound right to me. Are you using sticky sport tires? Too much air pressure possibly? Also, setting up your bike suspension is the critical first step. Go on YouTube and learn how to set the SAG and damping and rebound on the front end.

sorry I don’t have more specific tricks to pass on. I think it just takes time and putting in hours on the seat.
 

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Regarding the twitchy throttle, I would recommend you join the Suzuki GSXR 750 forum. i’m sure if there’s a fix for this year model, you could find it there.

That was the case with the early model 2016-2017 Suzuki GSXS 1000 (my bike) had a very twitchy throttle.
There were a couple of fixes for it. One was adjusting the throttle position sensor. Many of the bikes were off spec. And yes, an ECU FLASH might help too, but why don’t you research it on the GSXR Forum if you have not already done so.
 

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The “twitchy throttle” definitely has to do with throttle control. Many were complaining about this with the 1st Gen Suzuki GSXS 1000, I didn’t have a problem with it at all. I even prefer
a “quick turn” throttle!

but yes, go back and check your TPS.
 

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Seems to me if you go with the easier throttle cam insert, you’re going the wrong way. When you go back to stock, it’ll seem even worse for you. I think you just need to keep practicing with what you have.

you did bring up a good point, in that throttle play is not good. Take the tank off, so you can see the cable actuating and remove every millimeter of play even though they don’t recommend that. I hate any slop in the throttle maybe you have too much play? Obviously, you can try adjusting it at the cable by the throttle, but it helps if you can see underneath when the throttle cam starts moving. In other words, as soon as you turn, the throttle, it moves. Even though it seems there is no play, you know for sure the throttle mechanism is closed. I’m not sure I’m explaining that well, hopefully you get the idea.
 
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