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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello there,
I was wondering whether there's a way to turn off ABS on the ninja 300 by pulling a fuse or something. I know it can be turned off on the Duke 390. I'd like to be able to turn it off just to learn more about brake control, and for the occasional rear-wheel slide, maybe stoppie practice? I don't think I'll necessarily do it, but I'd like to have it as an option / know whether it's possible.
 

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Service manual states that part of the diagnostic check for non-functioning ABS is to check for a blown fuse. And a blown fuse does not have a service code to display (or reset), so it should be quick and painless to just pull it.

Attached is a screenshot of the service manual for which fuse to pull, for your convenience.


Basically, pull fuse, look for ABS light to stay lit, go 30mph, and brake hard. ABS apparently doesn't reliably kick in below 30 per that manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Service manual states that part of the diagnostic check for non-functioning ABS is to check for a blown fuse. And a blown fuse does not have a service code to display (or reset), so it should be quick and painless to just pull it.

Attached is a screenshot of the service manual for which fuse to pull, for your convenience.


Basically, pull fuse, look for ABS light to stay lit, go 30mph, and brake hard. ABS apparently doesn't reliably kick in below 30 per that manual.
Thank you very much. Will try it once I get my Ninja 300 ^^ It's good to know that it is possible to turn it off!!
 

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God forbid he death grips our massive single rotor front break right? :roll2smilie:
So true. Looks like I will really be killed when I install the four pot Tokico caliper, HH pads, and SS line on my bike.
Although I will say that I lifted the rear of my bike off the ground twice in my last ERC at Team Arizona. Of course it was a full four fingered thing. The instructors don't like riders using just two fingers in the braking exercises.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you don't have the bike yet, why not just get the non-abs model?
Because my dealer has only ABS models in stock And I want ABS on my bike, but I'd like to have the option of turning it off when I go to an empty lot or whenever I practice brake control, maybe do a couple of skids.
 

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But if you will have ABS, shouldn't you train with ABS? The likelihood of the ABS system failing when you need to do an emergency stop is not likely.

If you practice with no ABS, but in a real situation where you do have ABS, you may not respond correctly.

Just some food for thought.
 

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But if you will have ABS, shouldn't you train with ABS? The likelihood of the ABS system failing when you need to do an emergency stop is not likely.

If you practice with no ABS, but in a real situation where you do have ABS, you may not respond correctly.

Just some food for thought.
my thoughts exactly...why would you try to train in such a way that you wouldn't normally ride? Sounds like your are defying simple logic...and WAY overthinking this one...
 

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Besides, other than having fun with skids, you can still do braking practice with ABS. If the ABS kicks on, you fail. If you don't have ABS and fail, there's a chance you'll be consecrating Earth.

I never understood the maxim that you can't practice proper braking with a bike/car equipped with ABS. I thought that it's pretty simple that if your ABS activates while braking, you failed.

It's literally like training with a buzzer for a failure vs getting thrown off the roof of a building. Yeah, you may learn a little quicker after you peel yourself off the ground, or it may take longer due to the fear of the ultimate failure.

I'd take the buzzer over the boot to the nuts.
 

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I go once a month to a field day and practice on my ABS equipped Goldwing. You really have to stand on the brakes hard to get the ABS to kick in. At least I know what will happen if someone in a cage decides to "brake check" me.
 

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Another thought for the OP: I have ABS on the 300. This is my first bike with ABS. My previous 4 bikes before the 300 did NOT have ABS.

Having ABS, and practicing emergency stops on the 300 is exactly the same as my other bikes. I don't change a thing.

With my non ABS bikes, I lgo 30mph in a straight line in a clean and empty mall parking lot and just grab a handful of front brake (when I say grab, I really mean stab)....without allowing the suspension to squat down to increase the front tire's contact patch. If you use all 4 fingers and abruptly grab the front brake lever hard, the front tires will lock up immediately (it doesn't matter if you have 2 rotors in the front, 1 rotor, 2 pistons, 4 pistons). It just locks up. Once you lock up the front tire, you probably have less than 1 second to release the lever or else you'll find your eyeballs within inches of the asphalt.

With ABS, when you do the same exact thing, the bike starts pulsating. The ABS kicked in. Out of instinct, I release the pressure on the lever a tiny bit to get the tire rolling again. Although I haven't tried it, I am pretty certain that if you keep the front brake lever squeezed down while the bike is pulsating, the ABS will continue to work and you won't go down. Can someone confirm?

To properly practicing emergency braking, you progressively squeeze the lever, this way it gives the suspension a second to compress and transfer weight to the front tire so that it has good traction (and a much larger contact patch). When done properly, you will lift the rear tire off the ground. I've done this with a 250. Tiny rotor in the front. No problem lifting the rear tire. With ABS on the 300, the rear tire will lift up completely as well with this method.

If you, for whatever reason want to learn how to ride out a rear tire skid (fishtailing), the safest way to do so is go ride a bicycle down a big hill going over 20mph. Grab a fistful of rear brake and you'll lock up. Transfer the weight to the front of the bike by leaning forward. This will straighten up the bike a tad and lessen the fishtail. If you want to feel what a high side crash feels like, put your weight in the rear of the bicycle while you skid and once you're fishtailing, let go of the brake a little and you'll feel the bike jerk violently. Once you feel that, you better grab that brake hard again to regain the slide to smooth everything out.

With all my bikes, if the rear locks up, and if it steps out of line with the front tire, I never release the brake until I feel the rear tire stepping back in line with the front tire.
 

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Another thought for the OP: I have ABS on the 300. This is my first bike with ABS. My previous 4 bikes before the 300 did NOT have ABS.

Having ABS, and practicing emergency stops on the 300 is exactly the same as my other bikes. I don't change a thing.

With my non ABS bikes, I lgo 30mph in a straight line in a clean and empty mall parking lot and just grab a handful of front brake (when I say grab, I really mean stab)....without allowing the suspension to squat down to increase the front tire's contact patch. If you use all 4 fingers and abruptly grab the front brake lever hard, the front tires will lock up immediately (it doesn't matter if you have 2 rotors in the front, 1 rotor, 2 pistons, 4 pistons). It just locks up. Once you lock up the front tire, you probably have less than 1 second to release the lever or else you'll find your eyeballs within inches of the asphalt.

With ABS, when you do the same exact thing, the bike starts pulsating. The ABS kicked in. Out of instinct, I release the pressure on the lever a tiny bit to get the tire rolling again. Although I haven't tried it, I am pretty certain that if you keep the front brake lever squeezed down while the bike is pulsating, the ABS will continue to work and you won't go down. Can someone confirm?

To properly practicing emergency braking, you progressively squeeze the lever, this way it gives the suspension a second to compress and transfer weight to the front tire so that it has good traction (and a much larger contact patch). When done properly, you will lift the rear tire off the ground. I've done this with a 250. Tiny rotor in the front. No problem lifting the rear tire. With ABS on the 300, the rear tire will lift up completely as well with this method.

If you, for whatever reason want to learn how to ride out a rear tire skid (fishtailing), the safest way to do so is go ride a bicycle down a big hill going over 20mph. Grab a fistful of rear brake and you'll lock up. Transfer the weight to the front of the bike by leaning forward. This will straighten up the bike a tad and lessen the fishtail. If you want to feel what a high side crash feels like, put your weight in the rear of the bicycle while you skid and once you're fishtailing, let go of the brake a little and you'll feel the bike jerk violently. Once you feel that, you better grab that brake hard again to regain the slide to smooth everything out.

With all my bikes, if the rear locks up, and if it steps out of line with the front tire, I never release the brake until I feel the rear tire stepping back in line with the front tire.
The other thing to remember about locking up the rear is to NOT use more front brake once you lock that rear up. A skidding tire slows down a lot more slowly than one that's properly braking. So if you use the front brake too much, your rear will now be going faster than the front which leads to the rear tire coming around to the side. Once that rear tire gets passed a certain point, you're probably going to have an ejection seat very shortly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It isn't about ABS failing me. This will be my first bike, and I'd like to practice braking without ABS just in case I get something that doesn't have it later on. I never thought about practicing with ABS on without having it kick in, seems like it'll work, but I don't think it'll let me slide the rear when I want to. For me, I'd just like the option of being able to turn it off when i want to, like what can be done on the Duke 390.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
my thoughts exactly...why would you try to train in such a way that you wouldn't normally ride? Sounds like your are defying simple logic...and WAY overthinking this one...
I guess you're right. I am over-thinking this. Like I said earlier, I'd like to have it as an option. Besides, I want to be able to brake properly without relying on ABS, so if later on I were to get a bike without ABS, I don't end up faceplanting on the asphalt.
 

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It isn't about ABS failing me. This will be my first bike, and I'd like to practice braking without ABS just in case I get something that doesn't have it later on. I never thought about practicing with ABS on without having it kick in, seems like it'll work, but I don't think it'll let me slide the rear when I want to. For me, I'd just like the option of being able to turn it off when i want to, like what can be done on the Duke 390.
it is highly unlikely any bike you buy "later on" will not have ABS unless you go used
 
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