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Any helpful tips when street riding for the first time? What is the best lane position when approaching a stop light? Should I slowly ride between cars and up to the front? Or should I wait in traffic like regular cars do? Any help is much appreciated
 

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Wait in traffic, dont pass just because you have space, many places that ileagal anyways...let alone dangerous.

But you should take the MSF course in your area. very good for beginners, tell you alot about all those questions and more.

Also lane position always changes depending the a situation, there is no right or wrong answer, when in doubt, go to the center. But like I said, it changes a LOT given many variables including oncoming traffic, visibility for you, and of you, weather conditions, if your riding with a partner/group, if your approaching a corner.. etc etc etc...

Pick up a MSF manual at the least and give it a once over, but its no substitute for the course. Best money spent in my life.
Its like buying a nice helmet, Best money ever spend, especially when I need it the most, I will appreciate the extra effort and money I spent.
 

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If you're considering riding, these are things you should have learned before taking the test to get your permit or license. If you've already gotten your permit and don't know these things, the only thing I can recommend to you is that you go take some sort of safety course like the MSF's Basic RiderCourse. It's a two and a half day course that will teach you the basics of riding and how to be safe on the streets.

*EDIT* Ghost pretty much beat me to it, so..., "What he said!" :D
 

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If you're considering riding, these are things you should have learned before taking the test to get your permit or license. If you've already gotten your permit and don't know these things, the only thing I can recommend to you is that you go take some sort of safety course like the MSF's Basic RiderCourse. It's a two and a half day course that will teach you the basics of riding and how to be safe on the streets.

*EDIT* Ghost pretty much beat me to it, so..., "What he said!" :D
While this is true, (no disrespect to BM, I'm not trying to imply your calling him an idiot or anything negative), I don't think telling you, your wrong for not knowing this yet will be helpful. I know a lot of people who BS they're way through the permit exam. in PA its ten multiple choice questions which any high-school grad can guess right with any luck. you only need to get 8 right or 80%, i believe, though it's been a few years since i've taken it. Anyway, many people do this though it's not a good idea to go hop on a bike without any knowledge.

In all honestly, I didn't know nearly as much as I should've when I got my permit and that's why I immediately enrolled in the MSF Course. I recommend that to ANY NEW RIDER. It's actually really Fun and helpful and doesn't suck like you might think. What I learned saved my life many time and I just really hope you take it man, it's good stuff.

Oh and a quick P.S.- Even if it's legal where you are, don't try Lane Splitting, especially at lights. It requires a lot of skill and even then is really risky. Most of all it's likely to make you look like a huge As*hole to other drivers and the last thing you want is some road-raging meathead chasing you down when your trying to learn. Great luck man!
 

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I took the course, and I'll have to say its a lot of fun and a great learning experience. However, I think the main thing is going to be experience. Its a lot of information to retain, and reading and performing are two different things. Currently practicing, and still picking up things for myself to learn every day.
 

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I took the course, and I'll have to say its a lot of fun and a great learning experience. However, I think the main thing is going to be experience. Its a lot of information to retain, and reading and performing are two different things. Currently practicing, and still picking up things for myself to learn every day.
Well said. Experience helps a lot
 

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Take the MSF course. You r guaranteed lower Insurance its fun u meet fellow riders and every day I ride I notice things I picked up from the course. Plus most dealerships will credit ur class towards ur purchase price of a new bike and that makes ur course free. Don't think just do it !

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I just had day 1 of 2 of my MSF class, it was great. Learned a lot, and got to ride some, we are training on kawi eliminator 125's, they are tons of fun to ride on lol. Day 2 tomorrow, cant wait to knock it out and be finished, then if my second bike comes in for my wife, we can pick them up tues, or wed. GONNA HAVE A TWO PACK!!!
 

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I did my MSF class on a 2007 Ninja 250 :D Also, some of the places that teach the MSF course also offer advanced riding course's. I think it's definitely worth it to get as much training as possible to keep you safe. Also, if your interested in riding canyons and possible some track riding, I just watched the DVD "A Twist of the Wrist 2", and it's a great DVD. It's made by Keith Code, the guy that runs the California Superbike School. It has tons of useful information thats thats presented in a step-by-step approach, it's made a huge difference in my riding after watching it just once.
 

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I recommend finding a parking lot that you can ride around at night
then taking a motorcycle saftey course i took mine before i got my bike
then also make sure you dont ride outside your limits
it looks great fun to fly down the highway at 80
and the bike will do it all day but the skills to do that you most likely
have not developed yet and trust me its totally different looking at an
18 wheeler from 30 inches off the ground at 55 mph
 
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I second the parking lot practice. Try doing u-turns using the parking spaces as targets and reference points. You should eventually be able to do a u-turn within the space of two spots (depending on the spacing). Keep at it, but stay within your limits.

It's the low speed control that is often the hardest. Most crashes happen at low speeds for that reason.
 

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I see you are from SoCal so I would say to drive the way you would your car untill you get used to riding. the traffic down there is not M/C friendly and spliting lanes before you are ready will get you hurt. Keep a close eye out for drive ways cars going in or out. Hitting one even at 25 can send you over the hood and kill your bike, happened to me in oceanside. Other than that have fun.
 

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twist of the wrist & twist of the wrist part 2, both books written by Keith code.
the science of road racing motorcycles by keith code is another great book.

a few tips for road riding. there is no predetermined set place to ride, your constantly changing your position on the road as it is, but , try to put your wheels where the cars put theirs.

why
cos they like to drip oil and crap over the place and you dont need it on your wheels to get slippery. when stopping at stop lights, defiately move to the side and park where the cars wheels run.

if it starts to rain and you have the time, stop and get under cover some where. let it rain for about half an hour before you continue.
why do this i hear you ask.
the rain washes the oil all over the road.next time it rains goto your nearest set of stop lights.have a look at the ground where all the oil has dripped for the cars.no look at the water puddles. there will be oil mixxed up in the water, you will see the oil slick on it.

also get yourself a compact airhorn 139db from ebay, they cost under $50 and when used correctly to wake cage drivers up before they put you into hospital, can actually save your life.i bought mine 6 months ago and im so glad i did, it has payed for itself with the amount of drivers it has brought back to reality after they put their indicator on, didnt bother to look before change lane and decide they want to drive thru my fairing

get yourself some decent riding gear. dont ride in thongs/sand shoes/sneakers. you dont need leather now days to clad yourself,goretex works well. some draggin jeans/jacket work well

http://www.dragginjeans.net/

they are kevelar lined, work well

dont forget gloves. gloves are great. they keep the skin on your hands while sliding down the tar at 60 Mph

dont buy 2nd hand helmets, they are only good if you have a 2nd hand head.you dont need to spend a million dollars on a helmet, if you can afford it, get a Suomy helmet, if your on a budget, get a KBC. get a clear visor and you can do what i do and slide your sunnies on when the visor is up. i buy oakly 5 sunnes and they work a treat under helmets.

get some decent boots, i prefer sidi brand boots.

hope this helps
 
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