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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a review I wrote in another forum:

I test rode a Supersport S yesterday. Put a good 20+ miles on it throughout the city and some hwy.

I rode it in Sport mode. It's power is very smooth. when you first crack the throttle it's got a smooth take off, but if you want harder acceleration, all you have to do is open the throttle more aggressively and it takes off in kind.

The weight distribution made it feel very light, especially in slower, tight, city turns. The tires did a great job at sticking in those conditions as well. Once I leaned the bike in, I was planted in that position; something I don't feel on my 1000RR.

As far as comfort, it's the most comfortable sport bike I've ever sat on. It has a slight forward lean but not too much. Just enough to make it feel sporty and allow you to shift some weight forward for when you do a hard take off. The seat was softer than any OEM seat I've sat on -almost aftermarket soft-, and the leg position was comfortable but sporty. The shifter is also Japanese smooth. Most Ducs I've ridden have had clunky, uncomfortable shifters, bearing in mind that I've ridden only ducs from 2009 on up, but almost every model. It also had a very smooth, easy pull cabled clutch lever. Some riders may feel a cable clutch is a downgrade, but this one is so smooth, you'll forget all about hydraulic clutches. Not to mention, my Evo's clutch fluid overheats if I keep the clutch pulled in too long, especially in bumper to bumper traffic, so that'd be one less thing I'd have to worry about.

Comparing it to my current bikes, I found the Supersport to be crossed with some of my CBR 1000RR's power (and what felt like half the weight) and most of my Monster's comfortable riding position. I'd describe the power as just the right amount for an experienced rider who isn't looking to act like a hooligan squid trying to race every Hayabusa he sees on the road, but still wants manageable, aggressive acceleration. The seated position is more for shortly timed tours, like a week or less, and not long seated days either; I'd probably only do 400-500 daily miles or less on this bike, but then again, I'm not in my 20's anymore. If I were, I'd probably be fine with touring the country on this thing.

The only things I don't like are 1) all those electronics that I'll probably never use, like the Bluetooth bridge between my phone and helmet, and 2) the size of the tank which could be a little bigger for longer range. The SS's tank is 4.2 gallons. It's too early to do a fuelly check, but the Hyper 939, which shares the same motor, shows 38 mpg. Assuming 4 gallons of usable fuel, that puts us at around 150 miles, which isn't bad. In fact, it could be good because you'll need a break from being seated in the same position when touring, after all, this isn't an adventure bike where you can stretch by standing on the pegs for hours on end.

The Supersport is 100% an experienced, seasoned rider's bike who wants a mix of practicality and flare. I dare say, it's the best motorcycle Ducati has made to date, and I will be buying one once used ones are in the market. I plan on putting my CBR up for sale in the coming weeks to have the bulk of the cash when the time comes. Will I sell my Monster as well? For now, no, because although I've only had the Evo for 3 years, I've bonded with it over the last 20,000 miles and love it's classic look and sound. But maybe the SS will be enough to not make me miss the Evo; I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.
 

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Nice. For street bikes, I've always loved slightly sporty riding positions with a mild forward lean. At highway speeds with the force of wind, that's usually perfect.

How was the heat from the rear cylinder exhaust? Always a problem on ducks.

I like the bike, and might even be on one myself if not for the price and fear of crashing something that nice. The price is getting up there where I might have to finance instead of paying cash, and then I'm sure insurance is going to be an a$$ r4ping.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I didn't feel the heat as badly as I have on the Panigale or Monster. Haven't heard other reviewers complain about it either. Honestly, I forgot to look for that, which tells me it may not be a problem on this one. It could be that I wasn't stopped long enough, though.
 

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The Supersport S is the same price as the Panigale 959... tough decision. I don't like how heavy it is, but I wonder if it's lighter a good deal with the optional Sport pack's Akropovic exhaust?
 

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It's rather amazing how much of an improvement that wet slipper clutch is over the Ducati dry clutch. Still, I love the sound of the dry clutch rattling. To me, it defines the Monster as a back alley brawler and not one of the pretty boys. I've waffled back and forth on a Monster 1200 for a few years; I'm about 99% sure my next one will be a Panigale 959. Though, now you've got me thinking about the SuperSport...
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I've test ridden it, and the panigale is not a comfortable bike for long distances and no longer on my list for commuting either. if your body can take the stiffer race suspension and forward leaning posture, then it can be an option for you. I'm not that into track days nor extreme performance riding, so I won't go back to superbikes. The SS is sporty looking, has good acceleration, and is comfortable so it's going to be my next bike.

Also, if your basing how "heavy" it is off the numbers, then you're deceiving yourself. The bike feels light, even in slow speed, hard leans.

Rogue, the 1200 has a wet clutch, so you'd be sacrificing your beloved rattling.
 

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Rogue, the 1200 has a wet clutch, so you'd be sacrificing your beloved rattling.
I know... but the longer intervals for scheduled maintenance make it much more wallet friendly than the prior models. :wink2:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Definitely. The interval for the SS is 18k miles. I do my own on my 1100, which is 7500 miles, but the SS is a different motor with more valves and more complex. I might learn how to do it on that one too, but I have been getting lazier lately.
 

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Gotta wonder if a valve check on the supersport requires the engine to be dropped like it does on the Panigale. A major valve check on the Panigale costs almost 2 grand, requiring 16 hours of labor and taking the bike fully apart.
 

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No, the motor to the pani is unique and built to be part of the frame. This motor is used in a couple other bikes that have the traditional setup.
 

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We got lucky with my husband's 2012 Multistrada, the crankshaft cracked about a 1000 miles before the 15k service was due. Our dealer did the maintenance as part of the repair. Since everything was under warranty, Ducati picked up the entire tab to the tune of nearly $8k. The only bad part was waiting for all the parts to arrive from Italy.

Crankshaft
 

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Jesus, they probably could have found a used motor for less than half that price. Glad they covered it.

15k miles sure was a short lifespan for such major part to break. Sometimes I wonder if ducati uses cheap materials.
 

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No, the motor to the pani is unique and built to be part of the frame. This motor is used in a couple other bikes that have the traditional setup.
The Supersport has the motor as a stressed frame element also. The difference seems to be that it's trellis design rather than cast aluminum. That's what makes me wonder if it's the same kind of maintenance BS as the Panigale.

 

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Jesus, they probably could have found a used motor for less than half that price. Glad they covered it.

15k miles sure was a short lifespan for such major part to break. Sometimes I wonder if ducati uses cheap materials.
It's actually extremely rare for a crankshaft to shear off like that. When he went to start the bike one morning, it would turn over, but wouldn't actually start. We figured it was the starter. He took the car to work and that evening we called the Ducati Road Side Service number to get a tow to the dealer (who happens to be a good friend of ours). The next day our friend pulled the crankshaft cover off before digging into the rest of it and that's when he sent us that photo because it literally fell out. Ducati was so perplexed because this has only happened twice in the history of the company, so they asked for that one back so they could analyze it. Before sending us a new one, they scoped it to make sure there were no visible defects. When they got the broken one and analyzed it, they said it appeared to have been caused by improper heat treatment during the manufacturing process.

There's a really sad photo of the bike completely disassembled in this thread: http://www.kawasakininja300.com/forum/17-off-topic-discussion/27625-not-so-cranky-crankshaft.html.

Probably the most unfortunate part of the entire ordeal was that he had to pick the bike up on a December day that was rather cold... and we got a sudden ice storm as he was riding home - both he and the bike were encased in ice by the time he pulled into the driveway. He came into to warm up and by the time we went to move the bike into the garage, the brakes were completely frozen and the tires were frozen to the driveway. Do you the level of crazy looks your neighbors will give you when you're outside hosing down a motorcycle during freezing rain? But, we had to get it moved that night since he was having hernia surgery the next morning and wouldn't be able to move it for at least 6 weeks and the thing is so freakishly tall that I can't leverage 5 ft frame to push it around and it's too heavy for me to be able to ride, slide off the seat with one leg and hold it up. My inseam is only 28.5" - when I sit on the thing, my feet barely reach the pegs and they're a good 5" off the ground when I flex them down. #shortpeopleproblems
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
The Supersport has the motor as a stressed frame element also. The difference seems to be that it's trellis design rather than cast aluminum. That's what makes me wonder if it's the same kind of maintenance BS as the Panigale.

The valve covers are out of the way of the frame, just like my 1100, so you'll have access to them. Looks like a lot of other shit needs to be removed though, just like my 1100.

*I found a video of a guy who didn't drop his 1199 Panigale motor to adjust his shims. I wonder if it's removing everything around the motor that is time consuming.
 

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I've test ridden it, and the panigale is not a comfortable bike for long distances and no longer on my list for commuting either. if your body can take the stiffer race suspension and forward leaning posture, then it can be an option for you. I'm not that into track days nor extreme performance riding, so I won't go back to superbikes. The SS is sporty looking, has good acceleration, and is comfortable so it's going to be my next bike.

Also, if your basing how "heavy" it is off the numbers, then you're deceiving yourself. The bike feels light, even in slow speed, hard leans.
I'll have to take one for a test drive soon. I was mildly considering the 959, but the Supersport S with a sport package sounds like it might be the perfect commuter/everyday bike for me.
 
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