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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I passed my drivers test in October, and I'm going to take a motorcycle safety course in the spring. I've been into motorcycles my whole life and I feel as though the ninja 300 is pretty well suited as a starter bike. I looked into the ninja 250R, but I like the styling on the 300 much more. I am very responsible, I would purchase all necessary safety gear (although I would like to know which brands to buy), I would pay for the bike and insurance. Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

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This is a starter bike and a great bike for the more experienced folks too.

Just keep in mind that you may drop it, so finding a used one is a good idea.

Being 16, insurance will still likely be killer high but if you've got a job and want to use your money on this, then go for it.

Best to get your parents permission too. Do you live in an area where you can ride year round? Please fill out your location details.

Dave
 

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Hey there, congrats on even thinking about a Ninja 300 haha. I have had this bike for a few months and it was the first motorcycle I've ever even sat on. I love it and have put 5000 miles since I got it. You will get a great review on the 300 from beginners, novice, and advanced riders. As always you'll hear some negatives and even the occasional warning of wanting to "upgrade". In the end, get what suits you. Spacepod will suggest that you should rent a super sport to see if you even want to upgrade. Great idea in my opinion. Get what you're comfortable with and goodluck finding a bike. Post pics when you get it :)


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Hi and welcome! I think the 300 is a great starter bike regardless of your age. I also considered a used 250, but preferred the 300 for both styling and the improvements such as the slipper clutch and not dealing with a carburetor.

Also, good for you for taking the cost and responsibility of purchasing gear into consideration. Too many adults don't do that and ultimately suffer for it in one way or another.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is a starter bike and a great bike for the more experienced folks too.

Just keep in mind that you may drop it, so finding a used one is a good idea.

Being 16, insurance will still likely be killer high but if you've got a job and want to use your money on this, then go for it.

Best to get your parents permission too. Do you live in an area where you can ride year round? Please fill out your location details.

Dave
I don't live where I can ride it year round, but my family owns a 2004 honda accord that I can share with my sister in the winter.
 

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IMO, the 300 is the perfect beginner bike. Good position, good power, good styling. And a relatively low cost for a newer model of bike too.

As Dave mentioned, a used one would be a good idea as you wont be too stressed about dropping the bike if its used, compared to brand new.

And as Rogue mentioned, the fuel injection is a boon over the old carby fuel system. Reliable.

You may think you will outgrow the 300, once you think you may have, visit an advanced rider training with the 300 in tow. You will soon learn you know less than half of what it takes to push this bike to its full potential.

Is a great bike to learn with, and to ride even if experienced. I have many years of experience, and still love getting on this bike every day. One day another bike may take its place in my garage (lighter, more flickable, more power etc) but for now with all the bikes that are available in the market, I would say the Ninja 300 is the perfect beginner bike at the perfect price. Forget the beginner part, all around its just a great bike at a great price point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My main concern is if/when I drop the bike, will it fall on/crush my leg? Or do most people just jump off?
 

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My main concern is if/when I drop the bike, will it fall on/crush my leg? Or do most people just jump off?
It all depends on what the situation is. If you're moving forward with any momentum, it might be likely that it can fall on you. Say you're at a stop sign/light, it may be more of a bad footing situation and you can get out of the way in time.


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The Bike can fall on you. That is all stuff you'll learn about in the safty course you're gonna take. I've been pretty lucky in my 9100 miles in the sadle of my green machine to not have experience crashing, but it will happen. I regularly practice emergency manuvers on back roads and at different speeds. Just to stay aware. Stay aware, stay alive. But one thing I keep in mind is that, even though I love my bike, the first thing in the event of a crash at speed is that I will need to get away from it. If that means pulling a mario/yoshi (video games!!) and jumping off the bike, so be it. It's all situational and all stuff you'll learn about with time. Just never try to out ride yourself! :)
 

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When I was 16, I remember going into the library during lunch in highschool and search up bikes every day. I admit I thought about how cool it would be to be the only kid to roll up in a bike while most kids drove. It's not until 7 years later I felt I needed to grab the bull by the horn and hop on! That is, of course, you took in consideration your financial stability and if you can afford the monthly bills. Try looking one up on craigslist for a used one. For insurance, try to have it under the car's insurance company; it's usually cheaper that way. :) Good luck and welcome!
 

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You really don't have to worry about the bike falling and pinning and crushing the leg really too much. Between the shifter, the rear sets, and handle bars, you have enough crap sticking out of the side of a motorcycle to keep your foot from truly being stuck. Unless you're about to go off a cliff or go head first into a semi-truck, I wouldn't advise jumping off or bailing off a motorcycle. That motorcycle will absorb a lot of energy before it finally gets to you as the rider. Bailing from said bike and you just have your body to take the initial energy that normally the bike would be taking. Unless it's like 4 mph, you're probably not going to be able to jump off and keep on running. Although it does bring funny memories of Beavis and Butthead trying it from the trunk of a car.
 

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i remember when i was 16 was riding KDX250 dirt bikes.

the N-3 is an awesome bike for rookies & seasoned riders alike, and the *potential* this bike has is pretty bloody amazing.

give this bike to a seasoned rider and you will have a formidable back street weapon i assure you. its not the bike that makes the bike good, its the rider.

if you can master this bike and ride the wheels off it, you can take those skills to other bikes and do the same.

and if you cant ride the wheels off it or you *THINK* you can, take it to a race track and spend some time there & see how much you *DONT* know.

one of the things about the Ninja series, pick any cc, any year, is the sheer amount of accessories available for it, the 3rd party support is bloody amazing that’s for sure.

you can transform this bikes in to damn near anything you want, you’re limited by your imagination/bank balance/spare time.

some have dropped on Ninja 636 forks/swing arm, turbo chargers, single sided swing arms, air horns, HID lights, etc, etc, etc and the list goes on and on and on.

the best thing about this bike is how much fun it is to ride. it goes around corners pretty damn good off the show room floor and that’s where the fun is.

nothing wrong with a new rider buying a new bike, so long as your aware there’s a good chance your going to drop your pride and joy. & get a few scratches along the way.

a good 2nd hand one would be great, you can save yourself a small fortune usually
 

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I'm 17 and I plan on getting a Ninja 300 very soon. I took MSF in October and got my permit. Never rode a motorcycle before that, but I've learned a lot since then.

Anyway, I actually did drop the bike on my leg during MSF. I took a turn too wide and braked so I wouldn't go off the course. I guess I just got lucky, but I didn't get any injuries at all....so I don't think it should be too much of a concern. I was nearly stopped when it toppled over, but I'm sure you could get hurt if it lands on you the wrong way.
 

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My main concern is if/when I drop the bike, will it fall on/crush my leg? Or do most people just jump off?
My experience us that the bike will slide away from you and kinda throw you away. Watch out for the little yellow bumps in the dividing Islands. They'll flip you over when you're sliding on the ground at 50kmh.
 
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In MY opinion, the Ninja 300 is two motorcycles in one.

It is a great starter bike when riden mildly in the lower RPM range.

And its a great advanced bike when you do a few mods and start utilizing the top end of the tach.

Bottom line is that a rider of any skill will have fun on a 300!


-Clay
 

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As long as you have all the approvals you need from your parents. Should be fine.

I had friends telling me to get a 650 + for my first bike and i said no. My brother has an extra 650 bike and still haven't riden it.

I honestly think the 300 is a great bike with a good amount of power. Dont personally think i will be upgrading at all.

Good luck!
 

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The 300 is an ideal first bike. It's small, inexpensive, modern and can grow with you and your needs as they change and grow. It's cheap to insure as well, and at 16 that's an important metric. Well, it'll be important till you're past 25. ;)

I also like how Vorax put it; it's two bikes in one. It's a great beginner bike that can be adapted to grow even when and if you become a kneedragger.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks everyone for the advice. I'm working on convincing my parents, they're a little iffy but I think I can get their permission. I don't have a ton of money right now, but I'm saving up for the gear, bike, and safety course. It's winter right now and too cold/snowy to ride anyway. Hopefully i'll have enough money by the summer.
 

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Safty, did you intend to misspell your username? It's spelled 'Safety'. If not, you're only 4 posts in and it's not too late to delete this username and make a new one with the correct spelling. There might also be a way to correct the username but I suspect not.
 
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Just my 2 cents:

I always wanted a bike when I was growing up and could never convince my parents to let me have one. I had a car that I made pretty quick. Looking back at what we did with our cars I am very glad that I wasn't allowed to have one. I most surely would have ended up as a red streak on the pavement. Along with learning the rules of the road as a driver you will be learning how to handle a motorcycle at the same time.

I'm not trying to talk you out of it just giving my experience. If you are set on getting one then good on you for looking at the 300. It is a great one to start with.


Lol, now that I am racing I don't think anyone screams as loud at the track as my parents. They love it.
 
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