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I am a very new rider so this may seem like a dumb question but what the difference between shorty vs standard clutch and break levers? And why would someone change them from the factory ones? Do they make a big difference or have good advantages :confused: I saw some threads that people talked about what kind they were buying and I didn't know if was just a cosmetic thing or if it had real benefits to changing the stock ones. Also I saw that some were adjustable and wasn't sure what exactly the adjustable meant.
 

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I could be wrong but you shouldn't need that much lever.I think you suppose to use 3 fingers for clutch with your pinky tucked behind the lever and 2 for brake.the shorty levers can be different colours and they don't interfere with the fairings or cowling when you change the stock handlebars to clipon handlebars.
 

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People with smaller hands finds it more comfortable. With after market levers, you can also adjust it to have a smaller grip. I use 2 fingers for my clutch and brakes.

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People with smaller hands finds it more comfortable. With after market levers, you can also adjust it to have a smaller grip. I use 2 fingers for my clutch and brakes.

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I believe that is right...I don't have one (yet) but I do find the adjustments to be a wonderful feature :) I'm guessing it affects the friction time (clutch) when you change the adjustments as well. It's really personalized and it looks cool :cool:
 

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The friction zone will be the same, at the very end of the release. But the distance to the handlebar will change. There's a micro switch on the bottom that tells your bike when your clutch is fully disengage. You don't be able to start your bike in gear if you adjust it very close.

I cut off 2mm off the switch so I can adjust it closer and still able to start the bike in gear, it's nice for those of us who has the stalling problem when pulling in the clutch while coming to a stop.

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The friction zone will be the same, at the very end of the release. But the distance to the handlebar will change. There's a micro switch on the bottom that tells your bike when your clutch is fully disengage. You don't be able to start your bike in gear if you adjust it very close.

I cut off 2mm off the switch so I can adjust it closer and still able to start the bike in gear, it's nice for those of us who has the stalling problem when pulling in the clutch while coming to a stop.

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For those that are contemplating to do after market levers, DO NOT CUT YOUR MICRO SWITCH!!!! When you remove the stock levers, it will pop out a few MM due to the spring pushing the switch out. When you install the new lever, you just push the switch back under the switch plate on the lever and you're good to go. If you cut this switch, you're going to have to pull the clutch all the way to the handle in order to start in gear. Stock, I only had to pull it in halfway or so. With my adjusted levers, it's only 3/4 of the pull to engage the switch all the way. If you cut that switch, it'll eliminate the ability to adjust the lever in closer as you wont be able to restart it in gear unless you keep the lever all the way out or cut and crimp the wires in the switch to always complete a circuit. If you cut too much switch off, it'll NEVER complete a circuit and you'll never be able to start the bike up in gear.

The reason I chose shorty adjustable levers was to bring the levers in a bit more to make things more comfortable. The stock ones, while I can still easily reach them, would cramp my hands a bit after a while since I almost always ride covering my levers (entirely stop and go city riding.) You DO require more strength though in order to engage the brake and clutch though with shorty levers. The longer stock levers gave a lot more mechanical advantage and are a part of why the clutch feels so light to pull. When you go shorty though, you lose that long lever and the clutch pull takes a bit more than stock to move. Not nearly as bad as most other bikes, but it does noticeably increase the strength requirement to pull in the clutch lever.
 

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People with smaller hands finds it more comfortable. With after market levers, you can also adjust it to have a smaller grip. I use 2 fingers for my clutch and brakes.

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This is exactly why I ordered mine. The stock non adjustable ones are just a little too far away from the grips for my hands

I also only use 2 fingers when I brake
 

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Hmm I gotta look at that pin again to see if it can be push in. When I replaced the lever, I had to adjust it really wide to be able to start in gear. Since cutting part of it off, I was able to move it closer to start in gear. When you squeeze the lever, the switch pops out. I cut it cuz I don't want to squeeze it all the way to the grip.

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for me , the shorty compliments more my hand so i go with shortys :D
 

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I love the shorties!

1. I keep a 'close-in' grip and don't need full levers.

2. I'm a huge fan of clipons for the 300, and the shorties work perfectly in helping reduce interference between the bike's bodywork/windscreen and the controls.

3. They look very clean, and there are no parts near the ground in the event of a drop or crash to get scraped-up. Your bar will hit before the shorties do.

4. I'm a shorter-rider with smaller hands and the shorties feel awesome. I always thought stock levers felt too big.
 

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Hmm I gotta look at that pin again to see if it can be push in. When I replaced the lever, I had to adjust it really wide to be able to start in gear. Since cutting part of it off, I was able to move it closer to start in gear. When you squeeze the lever, the switch pops out. I cut it cuz I don't want to squeeze it all the way to the grip.

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The clutch micro switch with the lever off looks like a small white pin. The way it works is when you grip the clutch in, that white pin is resting against a flat plate on the clutch lever that pushes the pin IN FLUSH within the clutch control housing. Squeezing the clutch SHOULD NOT cause the micro switch to pop out. When you take the lever off, the micro switch pops out 2-3mm due to release of spring tension. When you put a lever on again, just take a flat head screw driver to pop it back in a bit to get it behind the actuation plate then put your nut and bolt to secure the lever in place. Levers are the easiest thing to install and should required 0 cutting or alteration of ANYTHING. Took me 15 minutes to do both sides. The switch doesn't actuate immediately in it's travel. It actually has to travel a bit before completing the circuit and allowing you to start the bike in gear. If you trim that pin down, it would mean that the lever has to be squeezed MORE in order to actuate the micro switch. This would kill your ability to shorten the lever since at shorter settings, the lever would be unable to actuate the switch within it's full travel. While not generally an issue when riding, can REALLY suck if your bike stalls and engine cuts off and you need to get the engine started again while moving. Would suck trying to down shift back to neutral and then start the bike without getting railed by the idiot behind you. As a rider, you have enough crap to worry about when the engine dies than having to down shift due to your lever not being able to actuate the micro switch. :rolleyes:
 

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So what you're saying its the opposite of these pics?...first pic is the clutch lever in its natural position with the pins pushed all the way in as in the clutch is engaged.

The second pic is the lever squeezed all the way in, while the pin pops all the way out, letting the sensor knows the clutch is disengage so you can start the engine. You can see the small gap, means I could adjust the clutch a bit closer and it'll still start in gear.

Now, why I cut it; without cutting, when I squeeze the clutch, the pin doesn't pop out far enough for it to disengage. Even if you cut it all the way off, it doesn't matter. It's the same thing as pulling it apart and completing the circuit in the housing. You can start your engine in gear without clutch if you cut the switch all the way off.

I cut it 2mm because I still want to adjust it and still have that safety feature without dumping the bike with the starter button.

We're saying the same thing, you just had it opposite of what I'm saying.

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So what you're saying its the opposite of these pics?...first pic is the clutch lever in its natural position with the pins pushed all the way in as in the clutch is engaged.

The second pic is the lever squeezed all the way in, while the pin pops all the way out, letting the sensor knows the clutch is disengage so you can start the engine. You can see the small gap, means I could adjust the clutch a bit closer and it'll still start in gear.

Now, why I cut it; without cutting, when I squeeze the clutch, the pin doesn't pop out far enough for it to disengage. Even if you cut it all the way off, it doesn't matter. It's the same thing as pulling it apart and completing the circuit in the housing. You can start your engine in gear without clutch if you cut the switch all the way off.

I cut it 2mm because I still want to adjust it and still have that safety feature without dumping the bike with the starter button.

We're saying the same thing, you just had it opposite of what I'm saying.

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Yup you're right. So used to it being the other way around on most bikes that I've seen that I didn't really notice it. It's a bit backwards and more of an electrical engineering pain in the ass to do it this way than the standard way. Usually the pulling of the clutch closes the circuit that excites said circuit which allows the starter to be energized. This bike does it completely backwards and must use a logic switch that shuts off the starter circuit when the clutch micro switch circuit is energized and the bike is not in neutral. What a pain in the ass way of doing it.
 

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freelancermg has once again hit the nail on the head, well written post
He described a normally open momentary switch. tmd beat me to it; our Ninja's (and my brother's R6 and our friend's CBR actually) have a normally closed momentary switch.
 
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