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Hi I'm Ryan and I'm new to the whole biking scene. I absolutely love my 2017 Ninja Kawasaki 300 I was told it was a beginner's bike. But I felt it definitely had the power that I was wanting when I first start riding it. But now after acclimating myself to the bike I could definitely see why and I want more! I still have a lot of beginning writers questions that I would love to have answered by people that know what they're talking about (you guys) so thank you for letting me into the community and stay safe everybody Ride hard and get home safe...
 

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Take a Basic Rider Course asap.

There are too many things you need to know to try to teach yourself. You need to learn the basics the right way.

As far as "Ride Hard" goes...trust me...there can be bad days...
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250 w/ 17' 300 engine, 07 EX500
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Hello and welcome, also what he said ⬆

As a rider for over 40 years, former MSF instructor, please do yourself a favor and take the BRC1.

Now onto the whole "beginner bike" thing is a myth. I've owned a many bikes over the years, my current bikes are 91 Ninja 500, 07 Ninja 500r, 98 Ninja 250, and a 84 Honda Goldwing Aspencade. Did you notice how many smaller cc bikes I have?

I absolutely love the Kawasaki parallel twin engines, so lightweight, easy to work on, cheap to run and maintenance, etc.... And I can outride bigger bikes in the Twisties, once you get the suspension and tires dialed in.

One of the best bang for the buck bikes out there.
 
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A Ninja 300 will exceed every posted speed limit I am aware of with ease. If you really kick it in the pants, a stock machine will do 185km/h (115 mph).
On the track, they regularly reach 200 km/h (124 mph) at times, but that's with extremely skilled riders and possibly modified for racing.

"Outgrowing a beginner bike" in nearly all cases means "I'd rather have a bike that can go fast, than learn how to ride a bike fast." In almost every case I've seen, the same guy who "outgrew" his beginner bike has to almost come to a stop to navigate any sort of curve. He needs the extra power to make up for his lack of skills so he doesn't get left behind.

Get a bigger bike if you want a bigger bike, just don't try and convince me it's because the smaller bike is holding you back. [/soapbox]
 

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The longer you ride (just over 40 yrs on the street) the more you appreciate smaller cycles.

Most of us don't believe there is such a thing as a "beginner" bike. My daily-rider for the last 15 years has been a SV650, which many also consider a "good beginner bike" - which it's not.

If I were buying something now, it would probably be something smaller like a Ninja 300/400 or R3.
 

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As long as I can keep the machines running, I won't be trading my Ninja 300 or Honda NC700 in for something bigger.
I might ADD something bigger, though....
 

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My husband has been riding for nearly 4 decades and has had many different bikes during that time - everything from adventure touring to dirt bikes to sport bikes. We just sold his Panigale 1199 because he no longer wanted a super sport. We also sold the KTM 640 at the same time. He replaced them with a KTM 690 SMC-R. Since he's always enjoyed flicking my Ninja 300 around the few times I've let him ride it, we've decided to add another small CC bike to the garage in the spring. He hasn't decided if he's going to with a Yamaha R3, a KTM 390, or a Ninja 400. Either way, it won't be anything over 400 cc.

As others have said, there isn't a 'beginner' bike, there's small cc and large cc - and a rider never outgrows a motorcycle. They may decide they want something else, but it's certainly not because their skill is so awesome that the bike no longer meets their expectations; it's always because we want something else.
 

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My husband has been riding for nearly 4 decades and has had many different bikes during that time - everything from adventure touring to dirt bikes to sport bikes. We just sold his Panigale 1199 because he no longer wanted a super sport. We also sold the KTM 640 at the same time. He replaced them with a KTM 690 SMC-R. Since he's always enjoyed flicking my Ninja 300 around the few times I've let him ride it, we've decided to add another small CC bike to the garage in the spring. He hasn't decided if he's going to with a Yamaha R3, a KTM 390, or a Ninja 400. Either way, it won't be anything over 400 cc.

As others have said, there isn't a 'beginner' bike, there's small cc and large cc - and a rider never outgrows a motorcycle. They may decide they want something else, but it's certainly not because their skill is so awesome that the bike no longer meets their expectations; it's always because we want something else.
I have some time on a RC390 that a friend has, and it's OK, but it's on its second engine with under 4000 mi.

Personally, I don't really care for a smaller single, compared to a smaller twin, on the street.
 

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I have some time on a RC390 that a friend has, and it's OK, but it's on its second engine with under 4000 mi.

Personally, I don't really care for a smaller single, compared to a smaller twin, on the street.
I think the R3 is leading the pack at this point. It's really going to depend on what the 2022 line up looks and feels like. The great thing about being good friends with the KTM & Ducati dealer is that we get amazing service at discount rates. They even do the mechanical work on my Ninja 300 for me. :)
 
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