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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK from what I gathered on the internet rev matching involves the following steps:

(1) clutch in
(2) down shift
(3) blip throttle, return to original position, clutch out

Then does that mean I never let off the throttle at any time? In particular, do I have to let off the throttle before I pull clutch in like I do with up shifting?

Or is the following the correct way?

(1) clutch in and throttle off simultaneously
(2) down shift
(3) blip throttle, let off throttle, clutch out, throttle to original position
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Keep in mind the entire process is essentially completed simultaneously in a fraction of a second.

Clutch in
Blip
Shift
Clutch out

Dont worry about throttle position, just... blip.
Cool that's what I wanted to clarify on: don't worry about throttle position, just blip :)
Will give this a try tomorrow.
thx
 

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Errr, probably a dumb question but why do you need to 'blip' the throttle? What's the benefit?
Keeps the bike from stalling (as some of the 300's apparantly have a problem with this) and also has the added benefit of your engine speed matching what it will be once you release the clutch.
 

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I don't blip, I normally know what throttle position to use as I down shift.


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Blipping the throttle is a very important technique to learn so that you don't have to slow down too much to properly down shift. It is something every rider should learn.

To do this I brake with 2 fingers and let of the brake for just a second to blip and then back on the brake. Technique takes time to master but is very useful.
 

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OK from what I gathered on the internet rev matching involves the following steps:

(1) clutch in
(2) down shift
(3) blip throttle, return to original position, clutch out

Then does that mean I never let off the throttle at any time? In particular, do I have to let off the throttle before I pull clutch in like I do with up shifting?

Or is the following the correct way?

(1) clutch in and throttle off simultaneously
(2) down shift
(3) blip throttle, let off throttle, clutch out, throttle to original position
To be honest man don't really worry about it too much if you over think it it's just gonna be confusing just practice practice practice it'll become second nature


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This is another one of those things we can study and ponder forever until we actually get on a bike and ride.

Rev matching is not a primary focus when riding. It's not something you need to be concerned with right now. Focus on safety, launching, turning, leaning, being aware of your surroundings, etc...

Rev matching, counter-steering, shift position, and feet positioning all happen naturally. They get programmed into your muscle memory automatically by just riding.

If you think about it and try to intentionally do these things, you'll end up over compensating and adopting screwed up riding practices. And you'll build poor muscle memory techniques. A lot of riding is instinct but the base for that instinct is muscle memory. There's no studying or curriculum for that, the only way is to gear up, swing a leg over, and get you a handful.

Just my opinion. I think all street motorcycles should come without any instrument cluster. No RPMs, no MPH, no fuel gauge, just an odometer. Too many new riders are obsessed with looking at all that crap while riding and it's too much to focus on while trying to be safe.
 

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If you downshift fast and at higher revs in order to gain engine braking for slowing down as say you are approaching a curve or stopped cars, and don't have a slipper clutch, you have to learn to rev match or the transmission catches instantly when the clutch is released and the rear wheel hops or can even slide out to the side. There really less advantage to rev matching on a small bike or any bike with a slipper clutch...and the 300 is both. I experience this first hand almost every day. I ride my gixxer 1000 with a slipper clutch, then jump on my Street Triumph r and without thinking downshift from 3rd to 2nd at say 40 mph...then I remember I need to rev match as the rear wheel hops and the rear end slides out. LOL
 

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This is another one of those things we can study and ponder forever until we actually get on a bike and ride.

Rev matching is not a primary focus when riding. It's not something you need to be concerned with right now. Focus on safety, launching, turning, leaning, being aware of your surroundings, etc...

Rev matching, counter-steering, shift position, and feet positioning all happen naturally. They get programmed into your muscle memory automatically by just riding.

If you think about it and try to intentionally do these things, you'll end up over compensating and adopting screwed up riding practices. And you'll build poor muscle memory techniques. A lot of riding is instinct but the base for that instinct is muscle memory. There's no studying or curriculum for that, the only way is to gear up, swing a leg over, and get you a handful.

Just my opinion. I think all street motorcycles should come without any instrument cluster. No RPMs, no MPH, no fuel gauge, just an odometer. Too many new riders are obsessed with looking at all that crap while riding and it's too much to focus on while trying to be safe.
haha my Harley only has a speedo and a neutral light. Works wonders. Learning without a tac actually helps in my opinion, it makes you focus less visually and more with feel.
 

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I generally drag out the clutch when down shifting. I hate the slipper clutch. If u activate it and jump on the throttle, it continues to slip.


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Yup, you actually have to let off the throttle to get the clutch to grip more. I have a heavy throttle/shift ratio and my clutch slips often, I just hope i'm not wearing the plates to quickly.
 
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