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Forgive me if this thread exist already. I was just wondering what the point of the bike stands are. Do they keep flat spots out of your tire or something? I know this is done with drag cars.


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Forgive me if this thread exist already. I was just wondering what the point of the bike stands are. Do they keep flat spots out of your tire or something? I know this is done with drag cars.


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That's one use, for when you're storing the bike for prolonged periods.

Mainly, they're for when you're performing maintenance on the bike. A lot of repairs are much easier when the bike is standing vertical and the back wheel is off the ground.
 

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Forgive me if this thread exist already. I was just wondering what the point of the bike stands are. Do they keep flat spots out of your tire or something? I know this is done with drag cars.


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If you are careful you can lift either end with a simple floor jack and the sidestand. Use a block of wood or rubber/carpet to keep it from scratching and put it under the drain plug for the rear wheel, the header for the front.

Don't break loose the axel bolts up on the jack, and don't bump into it either but I've done a few wheel removals and it is pretty secure.
 

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The most important use of a rear stand is so you can sit on your bike in full leathers while a hot girl with an umbrella is shading you, so you can pretend your Valentino Rossi :cool:
Or if the weather isn't good for riding, sitting on your bike in your garage and practicing your leans while making engine noises with your mouth.
 

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I don't personally like the rear stand for chain cleaning and oiling. I do that in the street so if a little oil drips, it gets on the asphalt and not my garage floor. It is safer for fingers too to oil one section, then move the turned-off bike in neutral a few feet farther and do another section. Takes about 4 moves. I use the rear stand for other things though. Somewhere on Youtube there is a picture of a guy who cut off finger tips by rotating the wheel the wrong way I guess on a rear stand. I notice the Kawa chain doesn't have any links that are different colored, so I mark one link with a Sharpie so I know when I've been around. I can clean off the rear sprocket too if the bike isn't moving by cleaning one section at the same time I oil the chain without any chance of the chain moving. Something to think about. Watch me get hit by a car squatting down to oil my chain in the street though. LOL Whichever chain-oiling procedure you choose, do not over-oil or the oil will collect on the front sprocket and drip down and look like a crankcase leak...or it will spray onto the rear tire and possibly cause an accident. I oil thoroughly using cheap oil which both cleans and oils, but then I wipe the chain and rear sprocket off with a microfiber cloth. I guess the last time I used the rear stand was to change the tire.
 

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I'm not sure I understand your argument... how is using a rear stand to lube your chain dangerous?

Prop the rear wheel up, spray one section, spin the wheel, spray again and work your way around. Same process you use, only you don't have to keep moving the bike.
 
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