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How do you get that **** wrench in there? i cant seem to wiggle enough space to adjust it... any ideas?
its pretty crazy but yes it says in the manual to remove the chain guard to adjust it, you can also remove the tiny rear hugger as well
 

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Okay, I'm confused...

So, if the roads in my area are beat up, and I also ride on the freeway quite a bit, should I bump up to a higher setting? I thought "softer" was better, but according to this, the harder setting is for bad roads and highway speeds.

The suspension feels pretty stiff to me as it is, like the smallest bump will lift me off the seat, but I never adjusted it because I thought the "hard" setting would make it worse/more stiff.

-THE DON
 

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Don, only you can decide how you like the preload set. There are ideal sag numbers you can shoot for but bike set up is rider determined. Some of the fastest riders in the World use wacky settings on their bikes. You can't adjust the compression or rebound damping on this bike stock, and that would yield much better results if done right than the 5 step preload adjuster so try it on each setting and pick the one you like best.
 

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http://www.ntnoa.org/suspension_preload.htm

quoted from that page,

"It’s important to understand what you’re doing while cranking down on that adjuster. Increasing preload does not result in a stiffer spring. It only changes the amount of load it takes to begin to compress the spring. Spring stiffness is determined by the manufacturing process, and is usually expressed in lbs/in or kg/cm. As an example, a 100-lb/in. spring preloaded 2 inches will not compress further with any weight less than 200 pounds, but will compress 1 inch per 100 pounds above that. Normally, stock springs should work well enough unless you are very light or very heavy, or if you carry gear or ride two-up. If you find that you are near the limits of your preload adjustments to achieve proper static sag, you may need to consider changing your springs. Also, if your static sag is correct but free sag is less than recommended (5-10mm) or if the suspension is topping out, a heavier spring rate is indicated. Conversely, a lighter rated spring may be in order if free sag is more than desired."

So, essentialy, you are setting ride height for the weight load. Add a passenger, increase preload. Lighter rider, decrease but only if the spring rate is correct in the first place. :cool:
 

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Something important to remember is balance.

Suspension front & rear should be "Balanced"

It does not help & will usually be counter productive to stiffen up your rear if you are not able to do the same for your front

I agree with what is written in this attached review
Around town, the plusher fork is much appreciated, but the stock
rear shock feels too firm and underdamped. However, we found that
reducing rear preload to its lowest setting had a surprisingly positive
effect; adding stability and increasing rider confidence in highspeed
curves. It just reaffirms that balanced suspension always
performs better than unbalanced, regardless of whether or not the
spring or damping rates are spot-on for one’s riding style
http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/model_eval/2012DecNinja300.pdf
 
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