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Just wanted to describe my problem and see if anyone knew what could've caused it.

I bought the bike used from a dealership and got it delivered to house yesterday. Took it for about a 10 mile ride before the rear brake completely seized up causing the bike to stall on the side of the road. Not too busy so cars just passed. Tried doing anything I could but nothing worked. Rear brake just came unseized after about 15 minutes of waiting and not really doing anything.

Today same thing happened except at a red light. Had to just power through the rear brake with the engine as it was a busy road. Pulled over for about 30 minutes and same thing the brake just magically started working again although I could tell it was a little stuck. I was only two miles from home though so I tried driving and obviously not using the rear brake at all.

Came up to another red light and I could tell the brake got stuck again but was only half a mile from home. A lot of cars behind me so I was just trying to get to the next street to pull over and wait again. About 200 yards after powering through the red light the rear brake caught fire. Put itself out about 10 minutes later of a continuous slow flame. No damage to the bike or tire somehow though but might still replace the tire.

Anyone ever have a rear brake seize up like that? It wasn't the pedal itself as when the brake seized the pedal was in it's normal resting position but wouldn't be able to be pushed down at all. Don't know if it was the calipers or the master cylinder. Talking to the dealership tomorrow.
 

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Something very similar happened to me on a different bike, not the N300. I left home and ten minutes after, the rear brake started to apply itself and slow down the bike. Lucky enough, I was going to the dealership for a recall. I made it to the dealer in first gear and really slowly.

The tech saw the bike. I had just adjusted the rear brake pedal and left it as tight as possible. I went for a test ride around the neighborhood and everything felt fine. But when I did the ten minutes trip to the dealership and started using the rear brake more, the brake fluid heated up and expanded inside the line and pushed the pads against the disc.
That's what the tech said. It made a lot of sense to me. He grabbed some tools and unblock the system. He gave some slack to the rear pedal and never got the problem again.

Another possibility is that the rear brake reservoir was topped off and not leave any space for expanding. Make sure that the fluid level is not over the MAX line in the reservoir.

Take a look at what was burning. Maybe it was the rubber brake line. Maybe it was some fluid coming out of the bleeding valve.
Is the rear tire new and different from stock? If it's a good one, I wouldn't rush to change the tire. Have it inspected by someone or post a picture.
If it looks old, or is the stock, then it would be a good excuse to put something better.

The dealership should take responsibility on this. Have you called them?
 

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I probably wouldn't have taken it out a second time without checking it out thoroughly.

You let it burn for 10 minutes? I think I might have tried to put it out some way.

Sorry to sound a bit harsh, but you put yourself in a dangerous situation by not looking into the problem after it arose the first time. It's dangerous enough on the street without having preventable mechanical issues.

Hopefully the dealer will take care of it for you.
 

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Many people get this problem with front brakes by improperly installing levers, such that the brakes drag a little bit all the time, and things heat up, like Topaz said. But this is your rear lever, and there's only one way I suspect this could happen to you with stock parts.

If you got it like this from the dealer, absolutely make them fix it. It should be free. That is unacceptable.

I had a problem with my N300 rear brakes after doing a pad change - and perhaps, if the dealer did the same pad change, and didn't see this issue, this would happen. So I did the pad change and I had the same issue as you, except I test rode around the block and noticed immediately that something was wrong. The brakes were stupid hot, obviously something is wrong.

So I took it apart again. Brake calipers on motorcycles are 'floating', meaning they have to be able to ever so slightly slide along two greased pins, to allow for the wearing of the pads and expansion of the pistons coming out of the calipers. This sliding motion is very slightly, but I had neglected to unseize those pins, and thus my caliper was not able to self align to the new pads, causing them to drag against the rotor and heat way up. It sounds totally like something your dealer should know how to do when doing a brake job, it's common sense when doing a brake job. But, there is a chance they missed it. Brakes don't just start dragging themselves for no reason, it's almost always because someone did something to them.

So if you want to tackle it yourself, take the rear caliper off, and you'll find some rubber boots on the caliper mount, 2 of them IIRC. Slide the caliper out of the mount, and if this is your problem, they will not slide easily. Once you slide it apart, clean the hell out of the pins and the holes with brake cleaner and scrubbing with paper towels, Q-tips, anything you can until it is spotless. Both pins and holes. Then apply brake grease, sold at any auto store, to the pins. Just a bit. Clean the rubber boots while you are at it as well to not just put dirt right back in there. Reassemble and test.

A lot of instructions I know, but that was how I did mine, and I have done every brake job you can to this bike in the book, and I do that little clean up every time since I learned about how it can seize your brakes. I'd be happy to provide pictures if it would help!

Hope this helps, good luck. Don't ride it at all with seizing brakes, the fire and risk of seizing the wheel on the street is very dangerous.

-Mike
 

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I would make sure the shop replaces your rear rotor and not just puts-in a new set of pads and calls it good.

Most likely the rotor is warped and shows signs (blue color) of overheating.
 

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I would make sure the shop replaces your rear rotor and not just puts-in a new set of pads and calls it good.

Most likely the rotor is warped and shows signs (blue color) of overheating.
This too. Mine got extremely hot just going around the block literally once. If yours caught fire jkv is probably right, it probably ruined everything. Get them to replace it all, good call.

-Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for the replies!

Got the caliper off and the dealership is paying for the new parts but because I live 200+ miles away I decided to put it on myself to save time. Didn't feel comfortable driving that far without a rear brake as well.

Going to get it looked at after I put it on myself.
 

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Nice! Glad you took the initiative to tackle it yourself!

Just be extra careful doing brake work. The parts need to be immaculately clean, free moving, and torqued down. One time I was cleaning my rotors on my late ZX6r, and I literally grabbed the wrong microfiber to clean it with. I was using brake cleaner on a microfiber cloth to clean it. But I grabbed a non-brand new one that was used but I washed it, and even after washing it, there was residual oil in the rag, and I got it on my rotors from literally like one rub, and it ruined my pads, all 4. Obviously I put a miniscule amount of oil on there and that would mess it up for sure, but even dirty fingerprints can cause issues. Use gloves or wash your hands frequently, and use brake clean and compressed air on the parts!

Good luck, let us know how it turns out when it's all said and done!
-Mike
 

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Water in your brake fluid is the most common cause of what you describe. it gets hot, turns to steam and applies the brakes for you, cools back down condenses and frees up. It's much heavier than DOT4 and will work it's way into the calipers quickly. Bleeding brakes doesn't require much in the way of tools, watch a few You Tube videos and you can do this.... They used to move locomotives with steam.... it will stop a 400 pound motorbike really quick.
 

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Water in your brake fluid is the most common cause of what you describe. it gets hot, turns to steam and applies the brakes for you, cools back down condenses and frees up. It's much heavier than DOT4 and will work it's way into the calipers quickly. Bleeding brakes doesn't require much in the way of tools, watch a few You Tube videos and you can do this.... They used to move locomotives with steam.... it will stop a 400 pound motorbike really quick.
But, if he had water in the line, wouldn't the brake pedal feel soft when the water boils? In this case, the effect is the opposite; the brake pedal stiffens to the point of getting stuck.
I thought water in the line had the symptom of spongy pedal/lever and lost of brake power.
 

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Water in your brake fluid is the most common cause of what you describe. it gets hot, turns to steam and applies the brakes for you, cools back down condenses and frees up. It's much heavier than DOT4 and will work it's way into the calipers quickly. Bleeding brakes doesn't require much in the way of tools, watch a few You Tube videos and you can do this.... They used to move locomotives with steam.... it will stop a 400 pound motorbike really quick.
But, if he had water in the line, wouldn't the brake pedal feel soft when the water boils? In this case, the effect is the opposite; the brake pedal stiffens to the point of getting stuck.
I thought water in the line had the symptom of spongy pedal/lever and lost of brake power.
Our Multistrada would constantly have rear brake issues because of water - I can, without a doubt, tell you that it will make the brake spongy as all get out to the point that it becomes useless. Nothing we did for the entire 7 years we owned that bike made a difference. Our ultimate solution, for multiple reasons, was selling it and buying a Panigale.
 

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the original post didn't mention pedal feel at all. just said the brakes were locking up, and the pedal was still positioned correctly. Also the bike was new to the rider and there is no known good pedal feel.

water expands by a factor of 1600 when it turns into steam at atmospheric pressure, a seized piston is not usually heat dependent, and it cools back down and unseizes, I've seen it on 2 dozen client bikes. $6 in brake fluid will probably fix it,

the hoof beats must be a Pegasus with sore wings



I don't know why I bother
 
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