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Hi guys, this is a repost from another forum but its an interesting read,

As the title states:


This is probably a re-post, I don't care. I think everyone who owns a motorcycle should have a read of this

Originally from here and here

A forumer asked the thief a few questions:



Quote:
[1]what type of motorcycles did you target and why?
[2]what's the best type of security system we can get for our motorcycles?
[3]how and where should we position chain locks on our bikes so you don't take bolt cutters to them? how easy is it to cut high quality locks?
[4]what deters you the most? as in when you see a motorcycle and analyze it for a steal, what makes you go "no, not that one."

EDIT: addendums:

what does a gallon of bleach taste like after you swallow it?



Here are the answers



Originally Posted by thief I posted in the other thread, let me copy/paste. EDIT - the formatting of this forum is pissing me off! lol

basically you want it to appear to take a long time to steal. $100 disc lock on rear wheel, $150 chain/lock combo through hard parts not chain and not wheels, if it has to be a wheel put it through the rear one, lockable bike cover, and keep your steering locked

Lojack is pretty good for recovering bikes from beginners, but I want to keep mine from being stolen in the first place.

copy/pasta below! As far as the first post is concerned

1) Mostly supersports. They are the most commonly crashed and generally the easiest to find (left outside in nice apartment complexes) Next would be Harleys and for a brief moment in time the high dollar choppers.

2) Never, ever, never never never, NEVER leave your bike outside at an apartment complex. Especially one with a gated parking garage. The gated parking garage in a mid to high rise apartment building in the nice part of a large city is the number one place for bike thieves to go "shopping." As far as passive devices go I like the NYC fughetaboutit chain/lock from Kryptonite, the thicker of the two. It needs to go through something like a braced swingarm whenever possible. If you absolutely have to put it through a wheel put it through the rear wheel. It takes much longer to swap than the front wheel. Any $100 disc lock will work well, again, rear wheel, locks on the front are more easily defeated, take my word for it. Cheaper disc locks can be quietly, well, we'll leave it at that, cheap ones can be defeated in silence. Lo-jack and Lo-Jack w/early warning are pretty good at recovering the bikes from amateurs and semi-pros, but someone who knows what they are doing will remove the lojack system quickly after clearing the area. Still someone even more professional (surprisingly rare) will have somewhere to check/store/breakdown the bike that is rf shielded. The problem with lo-jack is that it doesn't keep someone from stealing the bike. Even if you get it back in one piece without the police crashing into your bike to catch the thief you'll still likely have a broken upper triple, damage to the neck of your frame (Steering lock), damage to your ignition, damage to the tank lock, possible damage to the tank itself (rareish) possible damage to the trunk lock , and then your insurance company might **** you too. It's much better to not get the bike stolen in the first place. So in addition to lo-jack you want some sort of VISIBLE passive devices to make the thief move on. The paging alarms are somewhat effective, but they aren't linked to the police. Removing electronic devices is obviously more of a mental challenge than a physical one. The quality of the install is a huge factor here. Hide the lo-jack or alarm in or under the airbox and all the wiring within the factory looms and you'll have a good set up. However, almost NO dealer tech is this thorough. It's not his bike, why would he go the extra mile?

3) I think bobbypeel covered the locks and chains well. Very few thieves are this thorough, of the dozens of them I knew over the years I only came across one like this, but I knew someone that had a pair of bolt-cutters that weighed a lot, more than a 45lb plate at the gym, and had replaceable cryogenically hardened teeth. They cost several hundred dollars. The high dollar chain lock sets $150+ are worth it. Even the high dollar braided cable locks are good. They can be cut, but it's a pretty time consuming process.

4) Personally, if it's rashed up, looks cosmetically rough, but mechanically sound. Say grips are worn, been dropped on both sides, but the chain is clean and well-adjusted, tires worn hard on the edges, has any signs of safety-wiring for the track etc. It's lack of value isn't what I'm looking it. It would remind me of myself once upon a time. I think that's probably all he's got, his whole world, it's not pretty, but he rides the piss out of it. He gets a pass.

More for most people, just what takes time. I've known very very few stone cold guys that can sit there for an hour working on a bike. Most people will give it a few seconds, maybe a couple minutes, and if they can't get it they are gone. What is only seconds feels like an eternity when your freedom and life are on the line. Quality disc lock on the rear wheel, quality chain and lock, lockable bike cover and theft coverage on your insurance. For me, lo-jack isn't worth the cost. It's more expensive than theft coverage and after a thief has had his way with the bike I don't want it back. All can fit in a back pack and aren't much of a hassle to carry. Never leave it outside very long day or night. If you have to ground anchors are good like bobbypeel said. I always wondered what was available in a marine application for something like this. Something with a real burly chain/lock.

If you're temporarily parked outside somewhere a good little FREE anti-theft trick, bring a stubby flathead with you and remove your clutch lever. No clutch lever and they aren't riding anywhere. Of course if you do this every night outside your apartment they'll just come back with their own clutch lever.

Also - LOCK YOUR FUCKING STEERING - DON'T LEAVE YOUR SPARE KEY IN YOUR TRUNK. I can open your trunk with a butter knife, don't leave me your fucking key in there, jesus. Happens more often than you think. Also, don't leave your TITLE in the trunk, i've seen this too often too. Steering locks aren't that hard to bypass, but they aren't THAT easy either. Sometimes you get the freak one that doesn't want to break and you'll need to come back with a second person. In that time maybe the owner sees the bike and the thief doesn't get it. Had it been unlocked the bike would be gone.

Again, if you park outside of an apartment and your bike gets stolen, rent a fucking garage or self-storage unit near by to use as a garage. The thief is just going to wait a couple weeks for insurance to replace your bike and come back to check. If someone tries and fails to get your bike the same thing applies. Move it, they WILL be back.

The majority of thieves aren't that smart and half of those are on drugs, please don't be dumber than they are.
 

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Well, this practically answers every security question...I can't help but shake my head whenever I park next to other bikes or walk by one that has no locks, chains, cover, or probably not even an alarm system installed.
 

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I'm gonna park mine next to my coworkers Triumph Street Triple at work heh heh...and add a disc lock on the rear disc at the very least
 

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At my work I park along with 20 other motorcycles. I don't think there has been any theft simply because of the high traffic in that area. Thief would get stuck in traffic making the run.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is a few vids on YouTube of bike theft, blokes just have a guy walking past on foot to make sure no one is near he walks back round the corner to the parked van and then drive up next to the bike on the street where it's parked then 2 blokes jump out and lift the sports bike into the side door of a older Chrysler Voyager and then they fluck off
 

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Thanks for the insight. I will definitely think twice before I leave it somewhere for long periods of time. This thread got me paranoid now, guess ill be getting a proper lock and low jack soon. In the past one time i seen a truck pull up and two huge guys just picked up the bike and threw it in the back of their truck. So, I guess if they really wanted it nadly they will get it.
 

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A few years ago, there was a surge in motorcycle thefts in "secure" underground parking garages for condos in my area. They had a system where they would follow someone into the garage, scout out the area, and then call in a big van once they found a target. They would just chuck the bike in the back of the van and leave.

Eventually, the police made a bunch of arrests linked to two organized groups that were responsible for the thefts. Since then the thefts have gone down quite a bit, but it just goes to show how simple it can be to steal a motorcycle if they really want to.

In my condo, I know of at least two $800-1000 bicycles chained to a post. And there are a few motorcycles in the summer. None have gone missing yet, but I'm gonna chain mine to a support beam to make the ZX-6R next to me more attractive :p
 
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