Kawasaki Ninja 300 Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I picked up my 3rd Ninja 300 2 days ago. Traded in the CB300f so I don't have to deal with the upcoming major recall. I owned 2013 and 2014 Ninjas...both with fairing gaps. The 13 also had the ECU problem where it would die when the clutch was pulled, but Kawasaki didn't address this until after I had traded that bike in. So far the 2016 Ninja is doing fine. I do a hard break-in and just changed the oil and filter. It was very dirty at 73 miles.

I've been riding 45 years. I've owned a ton of bikes...2011 GSX-r1000, 2015 GSX-r600, 2012 Trimph Street Triple R, 2013 Zero S electric bike, 2012 Ninja 250, 2012 Ninja650, a 2015 Grom, 2015 CB300F, and about 15 others. I only have the Ninja 300 at the time since I'm cutting back at age 70.

I'm looking forward to following the discussions. I noticed the hard vs. soft break-in discussion. I do a hard break-in, but I'm not at all sure it makes any difference. Same with oil synthetic vs. mineral. You know many new bikes come with full synthetic. All the Vespas, Aprilias, my Street Triple R, among many others. Same with cars. The Prius and Honda Civic, Corolla, among them and all those vehicles seem to get broken in. Anyway, I'll put my 2 cents worth in the appropriate threads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
Care to elaborate on the cbr300 recall? First I'm hearing about it.

Curious as to what could be so bad it would cause you to trade the bike completely
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
There's a stop sale on all the 300s...CBR300R and CB300F. They have worked out the fix, but parts aren't yet available. It will require about 6 hours to replace the cranksaft which was not milled correctly, replacing the connecting rod and big end bearing and possibly the journal bearing. It involves all the bikes...2015 and 2016, in both the US and Canada and probably Australia too. It's going to be a very expensive recall as you can imagine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I picked up my 3rd Ninja 300 2 days ago. Traded in the CB300f so I don't have to deal with the upcoming major recall. I owned 2013 and 2014 Ninjas...both with fairing gaps. The 13 also had the ECU problem where it would die when the clutch was pulled, but Kawasaki didn't address this until after I had traded that bike in. So far the 2016 Ninja is doing fine. I do a hard break-in and just changed the oil and filter. It was very dirty at 73 miles.

I've been riding 45 years. I've owned a ton of bikes...2011 GSX-r1000, 2015 GSX-r600, 2012 Trimph Street Triple R, 2013 Zero S electric bike, 2012 Ninja 250, 2012 Ninja650, a 2015 Grom, 2015 CB300F, and about 15 others. I only have the Ninja 300 at the time since I'm cutting back at age 70.

I'm looking forward to following the discussions. I noticed the hard vs. soft break-in discussion. I do a hard break-in, but I'm not at all sure it makes any difference. Same with oil synthetic vs. mineral. You know many new bikes come with full synthetic. All the Vespas, Aprilias, my Street Triple R, among many others. Same with cars. The Prius and Honda Civic, Corolla, among them and all those vehicles seem to get broken in. Anyway, I'll put my 2 cents worth in the appropriate threads.
So why did you decide to get a 300 if you've ridden/owned all of these bigger bikes? Just wondering.
I just got my 2016 ninja 300 and everyone's making it seem like I'll be bored of it by the end of the month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Welcome @dkw12002! Always great to have a more experienced rider on the forum, that does not see the Ninja as just a learner bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
So why did you decide to get a 300 if you've ridden/owned all of these bigger bikes? Just wondering.
I just got my 2016 ninja 300 and everyone's making it seem like I'll be bored of it by the end of the month.
When people say 'bored', what they mean is 'familiar'. The bike's straight-line acceleration won't do anything for you after a while, once your perception and muscle memory adjusts to it. It'll feel like a Corolla. This is the point where many riders consider themselves done with a 300.

This is a huge mistake.

At 3 months you don't know anything like you think you do about riding, or the bike. At 6 months, you realise that at 3 months you knew even less than you thought. This goes on and on and on.

I'd say the only exception to this is if you live in a place that's classic cruiser territory. You really are better off with a bigger bike that can eat the pavement up if that's the case, but for city and 50mph rural roads, the 300 is just about perfection, and I'd say that goes for the Honda thumpers too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
At my age...70...bigger is not better. I now prefer lighter bikes. Now if I could get explosive acceleration out of a 350 lb. bike, that would be great, but the bigger bikes are getting a bit heavy to move in and out of the garage. I've also done all the crazy speeding I intend to do. Getting the 2011 Gixxer to 150 mph once was fun, but more terrifying. Then I did get a big fine...$575 on the 2015 Gixxer 600 and lost 4 points about 8 months ago. That was the wake-up call to stop speeding. That's when I sold my race bikes. I don't want to lose my license. Why have a race bike if you don't speed? Race track of course, but I don't go to the track. I get plenty of fun winding out a small bike and have always liked small bikes too. I do use the interstate so it needs to be fast enough to do well there. The 300s and arguably the 250s will do that. I grew up on small bikes. My first was a 1975 Suzuki 185 2 stroke. Wish I still had it. I'm not alone. Lots of experienced riders decide small bikes are a better choice.

When I took my Grom over to the mechanics and staff at AF1 Racing to try it out, they all took turns on the bike and came back with huge smiles. One of the top track guys there who races an Aprilia RSV4 even bought one he takes to the track.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top