Kawasaki Ninja 300 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 96 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The dealer changed the oil at 900 km thats something close to 600 mi. They told me they put valvoline oil and oem filter. Now I am at 2000 km I guess 1200 mi and im wondering if I should change my oil one more time and then follow regular oil change every 5000 km or 3000 mi. Im planing to use Mobil One M1-110 oil filter and motul 7100 on it. Ok so my three questions are should I change the oil now or wait some more kms? Also, is this oil filter good for my bike? ( psi etc. Btw this oil filter cost $16 here in canada same than oem) last question should I put more oil than usual if a use a larger filter?

Thanks for your answers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
It's not a bad idea to do another change. I did my first change at 800km with dino oil, and my second change at 1300km with synthetic. When I did my second change, there were still plenty of metal flakes visible in the oil.

That filter is fine. Here's a list of oil filters that will fit the 300: http://www.ninjette.org/wiki/Oil_filters_for_the_Ninja_300

You'll need a bit more oil for a larger filter, but don't calculate it. Just fill with oil until you're within the MIN/MAX range on the sight glass (making sure to follow the proper procedure of running the bike, letting it sit, etc.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,516 Posts
Fill the filter with oil BEFORE installing it onto the bike. This way you don't have to worry about running the engine to pump oil into the filter and potentially starving the engine of oil in the process or being too low on oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Fill the filter with oil BEFORE installing it onto the bike. This way you don't have to worry about running the engine to pump oil into the filter and potentially starving the engine of oil in the process or being too low on oil.
Filter is horizontal on Ninja 300, that'll be as messy as taking the used one off. It could probably be primed around 1/4 full with out spilling thanks to ye olde check valve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,516 Posts
It's messy but necessary. If you do it quick enough and don't cross thread it, you wont spill too much. The whole goal though is to have that filter filled up as much as possible so when you do your first engine start oil isn't getting hung up filling the filter prior to being sent to the engine and transmission. The whole element has to be thoroughly penetrated with enough inside remaining to not be a large empty void that has to be filled first in order to be pressurized. If you don't, you run a HUGE risk in running the motor with a vastly under pressurized oil system which can cause damage. Last time I did an oil change on the old cruiser, I only spilled a little bit of oil and only had to do a very light top off at the end. It also has a horizontal filter setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
An extra oil change can't hurt, especially early on. I did a hard break-in on both of my 300s, and changed the oil first at 50 miles. The difference was the 2nd break-in was very hard with repeated revs nearly to redline is 1-4th gears. The oil from the first break-in looked much better than the 50-mile oil from the second. When I did the second oil changes on both bikes at 600 mi., the oil from the first bike with the easier break-in was dirty, but the oil from the second was cleaner, lighter...same oil throughout since most of the break-in metal and stress to the oil came earlier on. I think it depends on how hard you ride. If you ride hard and break-in hard, the early oil changes may be more important. If you do an easy break-in by the manual, the oil will not get dirty nearly so soon. You can kind of see how dark the oil looks just looking through the bubble though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
It's messy but necessary. If you do it quick enough and don't cross thread it, you wont spill too much. The whole goal though is to have that filter filled up as much as possible so when you do your first engine start oil isn't getting hung up filling the filter prior to being sent to the engine and transmission. The whole element has to be thoroughly penetrated with enough inside remaining to not be a large empty void that has to be filled first in order to be pressurized. If you don't, you run a HUGE risk in running the motor with a vastly under pressurized oil system which can cause damage. Last time I did an oil change on the old cruiser, I only spilled a little bit of oil and only had to do a very light top off at the end. It also has a horizontal filter setup.
I don't think it's as nessesary as you think it is, not on such a small engine and filter as the 300. On diesel trucks that have filters that will hold over a quart of oil it is, but not on a filter that holds maybe a quarter of a quart, and even less since the only stuff that isn't draining right back into the engine is what is stuck behind the check valve. Your engine still has a coat of oil on the moving parts, even after you drain the pan, and it's enough to keep things lubricated for the second or two of idle until the filter fills up.

Sent from my SCH-I510 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,516 Posts
I don't think it's as nessesary as you think it is, not on such a small engine and filter as the 300. On diesel trucks that have filters that will hold over a quart of oil it is, but not on a filter that holds maybe a quarter of a quart, and even less since the only stuff that isn't draining right back into the engine is what is stuck behind the check valve. Your engine still has a coat of oil on the moving parts, even after you drain the pan, and it's enough to keep things lubricated for the second or two of idle until the filter fills up.

Sent from my SCH-I510 using Motorcycle.com Free App
The problem is that because it's such a small engine with such little relative oil quantity in it, that little bit in the oil filter is actually quite a large %. Read what the difference in oil quantity between just draining and refilling the oil and how much is needed when you do a filter swap. The problem with just sticking a bone dry new filter in and then turning the engine on, is that you have a really high chance in creating a low oil pressure situation as quite a bit of oil is redirected into the oil filter and having to fill and impregnate the filter element before even reaching the engine and transmission. You may not have enough oil to reach the engine and transmission to properly lube the bearings and can cause some damage from this. Filling the filter will prevent a low pressure situation from developing and prevent any potential damage from happening. Yes a light coat is left behind on the bearing surfaces but that'll only last for a few seconds unless some new oil with enough pressure is introduced to replace it as it gets forced out between the surfaces. I've seen many people do oil changes on their bikes where they don't fill the filter first and they fill it up over the high line on the sight glass and run the engine for a bit and then turn it off and wait and they're now sitting below the low line. That sight glass doesn't show a total % of oil in the system but is only the difference of maybe an 6th or quarter quart. Almost what would need to be used to fill the filter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
I think once the system is primed after the filter replacement then there shouldn't be a problem with a longer filter. It doesn't have to re-prime with each start...just get the oil flowing again. To get the system to prime more quickly, I always fill the filter with oil to begin with. You have to do it a couple times because it soaks in, and then as you start to place the filter, a little will spill out cause this filter is horizontal, but it still works to lower the amount of time it takes for the oil light to go off after that first start with a new filter and oil. I don't think after that it makes any difference how long or short the filter is. Now some car filters might have too much resistence for the little oil pumps on motorcycles, hence the specs for when the bypass valve opens and closes, and that's related to the bypass spring and resistence from the filler material. I just stick with the oem filter since it costs like $6 with the discount coupon my dealer sends out a couple times a year. In a pinch, I would use any of the other motorcycle filters. Car filters obviously work, but the specs probably won't be quite right...if you can even find those specs. Some people swear by car filters vs. motorcycle filters though. There is a popular website claiming none of the motorcycle filters are very good and you should use car filters only. You will never have any trouble finding a motorcycle filter that fits though since a bunch of bikes use the same size filter as the Ninja 300.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,516 Posts
I would personally never use a car filter on a motorcycle. Much different capacities and pump capabilities between the two. Also almost all cars now are dry clutches or automatics and don't share lubricants with the engine so there will be a difference in required pressure and velocity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,130 Posts
Have been rebuilding engines for many years, this is the way I was shown and taught too. Fill filter with oil before installing to promote better and quicker oil pressure. I don't think it is quite as crucial to motors already have been running, more to freshly built motors, but it is good practice to get into doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Hi, I just completed my first oil change myself. I'll follow up soon to with the dealer to check the other items on the 600 mile service. Just wondering what you guys thing about this combination:

FRAM: PH6017A (Motorcycle Oil Filter)

Valvoline 10w-40, 4-Stroke Motorcycle Oil. Says it's supposed to be specially formulated for motorcycles with wet clutches. Dunno, reviews seems mixed on other sites.

Couple things:

Thought I'd keep the dino oil this change, and switch to synthetic next change.

Factory oil filter was a pain to remove. Had to use the screwdriver hammered through the filter to remove it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,371 Posts
Factory oil filter was a pain to remove. Had to use the screwdriver hammered through the filter to remove it.
before warming up the motor. back off the oil filter first a little bit, and do it up hand tight & *THEN* warm up the motor. when its hot it expands and makes it even more harder to undo the silly thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
A lot of people do not like Fram filters, concerned about poor filtering ability and collapsing paper. I have one on stand by but I use the Kawa filters. Call around to different dealers and have them put you on their email list and mailing list. What my local dealer does is 2X a year sends out a coupon for 40 or 50% off (I forget which) any single supply part in stock. That's when I buy the filters. Last one was $7.02 including tax which is about the same as the Fram at Walmart. I do like the Rotella T6 full synthtic of at $21 a gallon from Walmart though. It's JASO MA rated meaning it is good to go for motorcycle wet clutches too. Love the stuff. Use it in all my bikes. Partly cause we have brutal summers here in Texas and my bikes get ridden hard. Synthetic is not supposed to break down with high heat as easily. Not sure Rotella is any better than Motul, Amsol, Mobil 1, etc, but the price certainly is much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
Here's what we did when I first bought my bike, changed the filter and oil to an elcheapo filter and SynBlend 4



and then ran the bike for 100kms then dumped the oil again, put in the same oil but used a K&N oil filter (pre-lubed).



This will ensure most of the crap is out of your motor. Make sure when changing the oil you have the bike standing up, fill up the reservoir, then start the bike for a few minutes, turn it off and top up the oil.
 
1 - 20 of 96 Posts
Top