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What are the symptoms? Does it crank normally but never catch? Do you hear the fuel pump prime when you turn the key and have the kill switch on? Once started, how does it idle?
We're going to need lots more information to have an idea of what to try.
 

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Can you get a voltage read while cranking? A drop is expected, but too much could be an indication of a problem.
Also check the connections at the battery. Loose connections can give these types of symptoms too.
 

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how much of a drop, i've read that if it goes below 9 volts is a problem and i will! thank you
I don't know if there's a formal limit, but I've heard around 10V is about as low as you want to see.
Maybe someone with more experience or knowledge knows more.

Where it's a new battery, an excessive drop would lead me to think you've got a problem with the starter or wiring to the starter (but it could just be a faulty battery). Hopefully that's not the case.
It puzzles me that the throttle would have anything to do with it if you're having an electrical problem though. I'm trying to understand the circuit diagram relating to the start circuit, but the jumble of diodes in the Start Circuit Relay has my head spinning (I do mechanical things, not electrical things).
 

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For information, the Service Manual provides relay box test procedures to check both the start relay and the associated diode circuits. Basically, probe the correct set of pins and check that the resistance is either infinite or low, and then use a battery to juice the relay and make sure the relay closes. If we suspect relay box, I'd recommend the check to confirm before replacing.
I tend to be a "diagnose first" rather than "parts shotgun" type troubleshooter, but that's a personal decision.

Looks like the relay box is over $100 new from OEM, but used ones can be had for around $30 or so.
 

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Absolutely a good idea, after locating what you think is the problem, to do some more specific diagnosis before buying parts.

We've all see threads where the person says - "I've replaced this, that, and the other thing - and I still have the same problem!"
I may be more of a nerd than average, but when my Golf Wagon was giving me trouble, I acquired an oscilloscope to monitor sensors until I found the failed unit. The issue only showed up above a certain engine temperature too and mostly on starting warm, so that made chasing it all the more interesting.

Suffice to say, especially if the test is free, I'm going to fully diagnose before spending money on parts, and if I don't have factory test procedures, I'm going to try and make up my own.
 
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