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Discussion Starter #1
Well the title pretty much says it all. I was originally planning on getting a used 2011 ninja 250r with 900 miles on it and then I noticed the 300 and well, you know. ive read just about everything I can on the bike and I'm liking what I see.
But when in conversation with coworkers and friends, they all ask if I sure I wont want a bigger bike to start with. Like a 600.
This would be my first bike and I have heard both sides. I just figured I would ask you guys.
by the way, I am 6'1'' and about 180 lbs.
So what do you think
 

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I ♥ Borat In A Thong
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I am 5'8 180lbs. 300 is my first bike. I am VERY happy that I didn't buy a bigger bike. The insurance / OTD price is a lot less. It keeps me from going a lot faster than I need to go (I've already pushed mine to 103mph... it's not easy to do around here in the 7 cities).

My buddy is like 5'9 220lbs and has a cbr250. The bike will be physically BIG enough to ride if that's your concern.

Don't worry about what the people who DON'T own this bike say. Listen to all the love it receives from the people who DO, coming from much larger bikes or first time riders.
 

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You will have a hard time finding anyone who says you shouldn't get a 300 on this forum. Personally, I like going around corners fast. I have no need to go 100+ Kph in second gear...with 4 more gears to go. You'll have a great time in the corners with the 300, it can handle highway speeds no problem, and has respectable acceleration when compared to sports cars. The 250CC bikes had their faults with lackluster highway performance and the need to really hammer through the gears. Many 600CC bikes are more like racing machines. The 300 is a nice sweet spot, and very friendly to beginners. You can;t go wrong as a new rider.
 

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This is a Ninja 300 forum so obviously most people will recommend the 300. Second most recommended bike is the 650R.

I started on a ZX-6R with zero experience and haven't had any trouble. I put many hours and miles into learning on back roads and empty parking lots before I considered myself ready for any real riding. Worked out fine for me and many other riders as well. In my local biker community, a 600cc is a starter bike and you'd be hard pressed to find a 250 or 300. Even the women start on a 600, even if it's just a Katana. Your size really has nothing to do with it as true sport bikes are not built for comfort, bigger guys will always be cramped on a sporty it's built for aerodynamics so that riding position is supposed to be crunched and tight.

Look at this girl had zero experience with bikes and started on an R6. After a few months she has some impressive canyon runs under her belt. She's doesn't do everything right but she's not on a suicide mission either.

The 300 is an awesome bike, if you get it you will love it, and it is suitable for beginners and professionals. I have been riding since 2003 and I have a blast on it. I do still yearn for the feel and sound of an inline 4 600 or 750 though. It's a whole different world.

I have read about people who had a 250 and sang it's praises for years. It was their first bike and the only bike they'd ever rode. Then one day they got a chance to ride a 600 CBR or Gixxer and they loathed the 250, couldn't wait to unload it on some n00b so they can upgrade.

My advice is to take your time. Go to a few rider demos, take a few out for a spin. Definitely ride the 300, then try a 600, even try the 650 or other sport-tourers. The fact is since you're new, you don't really know what you like. You know what looks good to you but in terms of performance, ride style, and fit, you just don't know until you ride a few. It would be better to find out all of that before you sink a bunch of money into any bike you're not sure will suit you.

100MPH on a 250/300 is the same 100MPH on a 600, won't hurt any more or less if you go down. Ride responsibly and with discipline and you'll be OK
 

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If you are the kinda person that likes to speed get the 600. The 300 is a fun bike but don't plan to do any faster then 110 or so. but for around down the 300 is a very fun bike.
 

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Where to begin?

This is a Ninja 300 forum so obviously most people will recommend the 300. Second most recommended bike is the 650 R
That's what I did, began riding in the 1960's - first bike: 1967 YM-l Yamaha 305cc. Got married in 1986, wife said no more MC's, so took a 26 year hiatus, now widowed and back into the sport with . . a 300!!! Now I own an 8-week old 300 with 1,200 miles and a "left-over 2012" 650 R that I bought a month ago with 30 miles; will title it and have two ninjas to split ride-time. Just trying to enjoy retirement. (There's another thread: "Ca$h Only / any savings?" My 650 R, new, zero miles $5,999 OTD, dealer would only accept cash).
 

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I can't tell if you have or haven't yet, but take the MSF basic riders course first if you can. Once you get the feel for riding you can see if it's for you or scares the hell outta you. As you might guess around these parts, I would say get the 300 first. While it's not IMPOSSIBLE to learn on a 600cc super sport, it's a lot harder to learn on and your margin of error is much smaller.

As Keith Code says, (Paraphrasing here) "Your focus while riding is like a ten dollar bill, every thing you do, takes up a bit of that ten dollar bill."

For most new riders clutch use and basic control manipulation takes up about $4-$5 dollars out of that $10. On a super sport where improper use of throttle and clutch will launch the bike to the moon or at least put you on your ass with just 1/24" of a turn, your focus on that 600cc SS bike will probably be around the $7-$8 range leaving very little left for everything else you should be focusing on. Your goal is to get throttle and clutch control to the 50 cent area leaving a lot more focus on everyone else who's out to kill you. You also have to take into account the brakes on most super sports are WAAAY over engineered for the bike. Getting proper feel for the brakes without doing a stoppie or washing the rear out takes a lot of that focus from a new rider, combined with throttle/clutch control and your newbie on a that super sport is teetering on the edge of getting overwhelmed. Let alone going down the street and doing the corrections necessary to not get murdered by some ass hat on a cell phone.

the cc of a bike though isn't the most important thing when considering the bike though. It's all about how the motorcycle is tuned and what it was designed to do. For example the Ninja 650r is a much more relaxed bike performance wise to the smaller cc ZX-6r. One is a sporty faired standard and the other is a race bike with lights on it.

The smaller bike will allow you to learn basic riding skills much faster overall than the larger bike since you wont have to spend so much time focusing on relatively small things and spend more time learning road craft and riding.

Ignore your coworkers and friends who tell you to jump onto a 600cc super sport. They aren't going to ride it for you, pay your bills and insurance, and take care of your family if you get in over your head and accidentally wheelie yourself into a bus. The 300 is more than enough to reach any legal speed at muscle car rate with a little extra if you really need it. Wont get there as fast as that super sport, but will still get there. Besides, you have no business going faster than what the 300 can go on public roads. It's a very quick way to lose the privilege of riding or killing yourself.

Welcome, good luck, and stay safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you! I love this forum

Thank you so much for all of the responses! I think personally what it comes down to for me is affordability. I know that the insurance will be a lot cheaper, as will the monthly payment. I also feel like I will have be safer. Knowing I have 600 cc's would tempt me to go too fast.
I think I'm going to get the ebony ninja 300 by the end of this week!

Also do you guys know of any race tracks in michigan for moto racing?
 

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Thank you so much for all of the responses! I think personally what it comes down to for me is affordability. I know that the insurance will be a lot cheaper, as will the monthly payment. I also feel like I will have be safer. Knowing I have 600 cc's would tempt me to go too fast.
I think I'm going to get the ebony ninja 300 by the end of this week!

Also do you guys know of any race tracks in michigan for moto racing?
There are only 2 tracks in MI that I know of.
Grattan and Gingerman.
I've never been to either though..
 

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Thank you so much for all of the responses! I think personally what it comes down to for me is affordability. I know that the insurance will be a lot cheaper, as will the monthly payment. I also feel like I will have be safer. Knowing I have 600 cc's would tempt me to go too fast.
I think I'm going to get the ebony ninja 300 by the end of this week!

Also do you guys know of any race tracks in michigan for moto racing?
The payments alone is what sold me

$113 a month for the bike
+
$26 a month for the insurance
=
$139 a month.
 

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EXCELLENT choice

You have made a very wise decision. As said in other posts, the new 636cc Kawi and the similar bikes are high strung by nature. An experienced rider makes those missles seem docile - you'll get there, they won't quit making them so you can move-up later. I'm 62 yrs., have had a 1,000cc bike (1977 R 100/S BMW), got mad at my girlfriend and tucked, turned 8,000 in 5th one time. Was really irritated at her, went home and calculated the speed: 138 mph (140 mph speedo was buried), lived to tell. And yes, had anything happened it would have been HER fault, right? NO . . whose fault: asphault! ha.ha.ha
 

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Get the 300 if that is what you want. I started out on a RR and did fine. I progressed to track riding then instructing and then racing the 600. Had a blast. Bought a 2010 250 to endurance and it was literally the most fun I have ever had. I sold everything a few years ago for health reasons. Now 2 years later I just bought the 300. I have gotten nothing but grief from my track/racing friend about the slow bike..... hahaha just wait til I pass their butts in the corners only yo have them zoom past me down the straights only to have me pass em again in the next corner.
 

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You made a great choice! You'll love the 300.

It sucks that wherever you go online, there's always a bunch of extreme comments about starting on a 600 that scare people into buying something they really don't want. While that may not apply here because you really wanted the 300 anyway, it's pretty common.

I would have to strongly disagree with the whole $10 spiel though about the bike "lauching to the moon with 1/24 twist of the throttle". That is a huge over exxaggeration as even a modded 600 is difficult to wheelie without doing a clutch up. I've been on several different sporties and I don't notice any drastic differences in the braking power. The bike brakes how and when you tell it to. If you squeeze hard, it will brake hard. That's how all bikes are engineered to work. A lot of motorcycling does have to become muscle memory and instinct so you can focus on safety. That's why practice is important.

As someone who started on a 600 super sport, I can say from experience that it is not difficult at all. I knew how to drive a manual transmission car, and I been riding bicycles all my life. I just put the two together and kept a cool head. I've made mistakes like stalling, clutch dumping, locking the brakes, accidental throttle blips, and every other mistake a n00b makes. I never ended up on the moon or my butt. (Thank God)

Again, I love the 300, you made a great choice, I just always feel the need to add some reality to the conversation when talking about starting on a 600.

Enjoy your purchase and be sure to keep us updated on any mods and such!
 

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Actually, get both. First the 300, then keep it and get a fast bike, but not a 600. Get a liter bike which has much better torque down low as well as everywhere else. Then you have two bikes that complement each other. Save your money, pay cash, then get liability insurance only. The second bike will then cost you like $12 a year, no matter what size it is.
 

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You made a great choice! You'll love the 300.

It sucks that wherever you go online, there's always a bunch of extreme comments about starting on a 600 that scare people into buying something they really don't want. While that may not apply here because you really wanted the 300 anyway, it's pretty common.

I would have to strongly disagree with the whole $10 spiel though about the bike "lauching to the moon with 1/24 twist of the throttle". That is a huge over exxaggeration as even a modded 600 is difficult to wheelie without doing a clutch up. I've been on several different sporties and I don't notice any drastic differences in the braking power. The bike brakes how and when you tell it to. If you squeeze hard, it will brake hard. That's how all bikes are engineered to work. A lot of motorcycling does have to become muscle memory and instinct so you can focus on safety. That's why practice is important.

As someone who started on a 600 super sport, I can say from experience that it is not difficult at all. I knew how to drive a manual transmission car, and I been riding bicycles all my life. I just put the two together and kept a cool head. I've made mistakes like stalling, clutch dumping, locking the brakes, accidental throttle blips, and every other mistake a n00b makes. I never ended up on the moon or my butt. (Thank God)

Again, I love the 300, you made a great choice, I just always feel the need to add some reality to the conversation when talking about starting on a 600.

Enjoy your purchase and be sure to keep us updated on any mods and such!
The 1/24th bit was from when I rode my friend's Honda CBR600rr. Before I ride any motorcycle I'm not familiar with, I play with the throttle a bit to judge sensitivity of the throttle. It takes only a little bit of a twist to get it into the 2-3k RPM range to get started. No issue there. The problem comes in the slight difference when you twist the throttle from there and it almost immediately jumps to 6k-7k. While not an issue once you get moving, a brand new riding who doesn't know how to properly modulate the clutch and accident drops that clutch on 6-7k RPMs is probably not going to be on the bike much longer. Especially since the natural thing to do as your body is moving backwards on something is to grip harder (further rolling back on the throttle) generally makes things even worse.

As far as brakes on a super sport are concerned, they are designed to slow the bike and rider from a very high average speed quickly and efficiently. Most of these bikes use two large rotors and much larger calipers to do this. While what you say is true, less pressure less brakes, the required amount of pressure and lever travel is going to be much less than on the 300. The 300 you have to really give it a good hearty pull relative to the super sport to get the same stopping distance. I was just stating that the nature of the super sport for regular street riding is way over engineered for the use it would see doing legal speeds. You shouldn't be repeatedly and rapidly bleeding off 140mph+ speeds regularly ESPECIALLY as a new rider. The fact that you will generally be doing a stoppie before reaching the traction limits on your tires (skidding.)

As I said earlier, I was not saying that it's impossible and can't be done. There are many that are proof that it can be. I'm just saying it's much easier, generally safer, and cheaper to start on the 300 and build your skills up rather than adding more crap to the riders plate that he/she doesn't need.
The drastic differences in inches and pressure for a barely trained rider between the two bikes makes the margin of error much smaller on the bigger more powerful bike designed on being raced and performing at speed and getting to speed fast.

That $10 part was from legendary racer Keith Code who many consider to be one of the best racing trainer/coach around. It's used as an example to show that your attention and focus of what your mind is capable is finite and a resource to be managed. New riders have to spend a much larger portion of their attention/focus to do even the most basic things until it starts becoming second nature and they can start spending that focus to other areas. The more sensitive controls on a super sport require more focus than the much more sedate 300. That's less focus that can be dedicated to everything else. Even now, we all use some focus on all the basic things, it's just become so natural that we don't notice it.
 

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Two or more ownership

Actually, get both. First the 300, then keep it and get a fast bike, but not a 600. Get a liter bike which has much better torque down low as well as everywhere else. Then you have two bikes that complement each other. Save your money, pay cash, then get liability insurance only. The second bike will then cost you like $12 a year, no matter what size it is.
This is totally true. The second bike with my underwriter (Nationwide) is tacked-on as a rider, often LESS than $12 a year. Currently have 3 bikes and 3 cars insured. Having a clean driving record/maturity is the kicker; also multi-vehicle, etc.
 

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The 1/24th bit was from when I rode my friend's Honda CBR600rr. Before I ride any motorcycle I'm not familiar with, I play with the throttle a bit to judge sensitivity of the throttle. It takes only a little bit of a twist to get it into the 2-3k RPM range to get started. No issue there. The problem comes in the slight difference when you twist the throttle from there and it almost immediately jumps to 6k-7k. While not an issue once you get moving, a brand new riding who doesn't know how to properly modulate the clutch and accident drops that clutch on 6-7k RPMs is probably not going to be on the bike much longer. Especially since the natural thing to do as your body is moving backwards on something is to grip harder (further rolling back on the throttle) generally makes things even worse.

As far as brakes on a super sport are concerned, they are designed to slow the bike and rider from a very high average speed quickly and efficiently. Most of these bikes use two large rotors and much larger calipers to do this. While what you say is true, less pressure less brakes, the required amount of pressure and lever travel is going to be much less than on the 300. The 300 you have to really give it a good hearty pull relative to the super sport to get the same stopping distance. I was just stating that the nature of the super sport for regular street riding is way over engineered for the use it would see doing legal speeds. You shouldn't be repeatedly and rapidly bleeding off 140mph+ speeds regularly ESPECIALLY as a new rider. The fact that you will generally be doing a stoppie before reaching the traction limits on your tires (skidding.)

As I said earlier, I was not saying that it's impossible and can't be done. There are many that are proof that it can be. I'm just saying it's much easier, generally safer, and cheaper to start on the 300 and build your skills up rather than adding more crap to the riders plate that he/she doesn't need.
The drastic differences in inches and pressure for a barely trained rider between the two bikes makes the margin of error much smaller on the bigger more powerful bike designed on being raced and performing at speed and getting to speed fast.

That $10 part was from legendary racer Keith Code who many consider to be one of the best racing trainer/coach around. It's used as an example to show that your attention and focus of what your mind is capable is finite and a resource to be managed. New riders have to spend a much larger portion of their attention/focus to do even the most basic things until it starts becoming second nature and they can start spending that focus to other areas. The more sensitive controls on a super sport require more focus than the much more sedate 300. That's less focus that can be dedicated to everything else. Even now, we all use some focus on all the basic things, it's just become so natural that we don't notice it.
Well said! Much agreed after all
 
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