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Guys I’m asking a serious question because I don’t want to de and you guys say I’m trolling or some things. I don’t get it

Me thinks you got a decent amount of serious answers.
There is NOT A SINGLE PERSON on this forum that would suggest you save money and NOT get a safety course. What more do you want us to say???


Maybe this will help:


한국 사람들이 그들의 장로 들에 대해 얼마나 존경 하는지 알면, 당신이 오토바이를 타고 계획 하는 것을 보호자에 게 말하지 않으면 매우 실망 할 것입니다. 부모님께 이야기 한 후에도 오토바이 안전 교육을 완료 하십시오.
 

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Hey guys, I got bought my 2013 ninja 300 today. Since it's my first bike and I've never rode a motorcycle so I'm worried. Can anyone tell me what I have to do with the maintenance with ninja 300? Thanks :)
I'm surprised nobody mentioned maintenance yet :)
First and foremost, start your own journal to keep maintenance records, mark down current mileage and make notes on visual inspection results.
You definitely need to check with your owner's manual or maintenance guide if you have one.
If the previous owner left any records, it may spare you from doing some things.
Otherwise, assume that the previous owner neglected the maintenance and just do it.
Start with basics, like inflate the tires to proper pressure, clean and lube the chain, change oil and filter, change breaks liquid, change coolant.
That thing will take you up to 80 mph on a highway.
Take care of it so that it can take care of you :)
With that said, have fun and enjoy the ride!

Owner's Manual
Service Manual
P.S. If someone has an up-to-date version of either manual, please DM me a link :)
 

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If all true (which I am now starting to doubt), you seem to be a bit of a snot-rag.

Are you saying you bought a motorcycle without telling your parents or your guardians? Where did the money come from? Where do you store the motorcycle?


At this point maybe it doesn't matter if you do or if you don't take a safety course....at least to me.


Unless you man up, and come back here with some sound judgment and take some adult responsibility, you don't have my sympathy any longer.
:growup:


(Again, the whole story is rather dubious and doubtful....)

:iagree: :bestpost: :10:
 

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I am a Motorcycle Safety Foundation RiderCoach. I contacted another RiderCoach who is also an MC Program Manager in Tucson. She forwarded this information to me:


https://www.amsaf.org/scholarships/


Basically, Arizona Motorcycle Awareness and Safety Foundation provides funds so that you only have to pay $100 and whatever difference there would be between the scholarship ($225) and the course fee (see list of participating course providers). It is first come, first served, and is not financial need based.



A safety course will teach you risk management strategies, basic on-bike skills, and emergency maneuvers. I don't know AZ's exact rules, but typically successfully completing the class (which includes a skills test that waives the requirement to take it at the DOT) will allow you to go directly to the DOT to get your MC license (some states require an additional written DOT test, but since you have your MC permit, you should be good to go). It is designed for complete beginners like you (and you use our bikes!), but experienced riders also find value in it; every student I have ever had learned something--and sometimes it's that motorcycling isn't for them. And that's OK. I've had graduates tell me that something they learned saved their skin; stuff I learned and teach others has saved MY skin multiple times!


So please take our advice. First, be honest with your parents and guardians. Most importantly, they love and care about you; secondly, even though you are 18, they will be the ones responsible should anything happen to you; thirdly, it is your duty to do so because they are your elders and you owe them that respect and consideration. Riding a motorcycle is a risky choice; it can be done safely with proper training, and should never be done impetuously. You have made some responsible choices here: You worked hard to earn the money; you bought a used, beginner-friendly bike; you have your MC permit; you have license and insurance and also gear, right? When you discuss the matter with them, prove to them that you can be a responsible rider as well by giving them the information about the safety course. They may even be willing to help pay the difference after the scholarship (assuming you get one).


Let us know how it goes. I bet most of us here are parents--and we were all kids at one time or another! So we know how you're feeling and how your parents and guardians will feel. We hope we see you posting good news that will get you going on your motorcycling career the RIGHT way!
 

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I am a Motorcycle Safety Foundation RiderCoach. I contacted another RiderCoach who is also an MC Program Manager in Tucson. She forwarded this information to me:


https://www.amsaf.org/scholarships/


Basically, Arizona Motorcycle Awareness and Safety Foundation provides funds so that you only have to pay $100 and whatever difference there would be between the scholarship ($225) and the course fee (see list of participating course providers). It is first come, first served, and is not financial need based.



A safety course will teach you risk management strategies, basic on-bike skills, and emergency maneuvers. I don't know AZ's exact rules, but typically successfully completing the class (which includes a skills test that waives the requirement to take it at the DOT) will allow you to go directly to the DOT to get your MC license (some states require an additional written DOT test, but since you have your MC permit, you should be good to go). It is designed for complete beginners like you (and you use our bikes!), but experienced riders also find value in it; every student I have ever had learned something--and sometimes it's that motorcycling isn't for them. And that's OK. I've had graduates tell me that something they learned saved their skin; stuff I learned and teach others has saved MY skin multiple times!


So please take our advice. First, be honest with your parents and guardians. Most importantly, they love and care about you; secondly, even though you are 18, they will be the ones responsible should anything happen to you; thirdly, it is your duty to do so because they are your elders and you owe them that respect and consideration. Riding a motorcycle is a risky choice; it can be done safely with proper training, and should never be done impetuously. You have made some responsible choices here: You worked hard to earn the money; you bought a used, beginner-friendly bike; you have your MC permit; you have license and insurance and also gear, right? When you discuss the matter with them, prove to them that you can be a responsible rider as well by giving them the information about the safety course. They may even be willing to help pay the difference after the scholarship (assuming you get one).


Let us know how it goes. I bet most of us here are parents--and we were all kids at one time or another! So we know how you're feeling and how your parents and guardians will feel. We hope we see you posting good news that will get you going on your motorcycling career the RIGHT way!

:eek:mg: :sigh: Honest and sincere :excl:
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I really want to tell my parents and my guardians. I'm not like a guy who doesn't think about what I'm doing. Again, my parents are not going to buy me a car because the insurance is too expensive. It's not the car, it's the insurance. My guardians are not going to put me in for their insurance bc the insurance goes up if i get a ticket. I need a vehicle to go places for school classes(two) that I take and maybe just outside for fun:) that's why I bought the motorcycle, Cheap everything. They will eventually see me riding a motorcycle. World is small. Thanks to everyone, I've decided to save my money to take the motorcycle safety course. Yesterday was my first time on the road, I made some mistakes, but I think I really rode it safely and I will keep be riding safely. I'm probably going to tell my parents and my guardians I have a motorcycle soon:)
 

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Yesterday was my first time on the road, I made some mistakes, but I think I really rode it safely and I will keep be riding safely. I'm probably going to tell my parents and my guardians I have a motorcycle soon:)

In class we spend 10 HOURS in a parking lot learning basic bike handling skills and emergency maneuvers. The street is NOT the place to be, just hoping that you'll get the hang of it while dodging traffic.


Do the parents and guardians know yet??
 

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I really want to tell my parents and my guardians. I'm not like a guy who doesn't think about what I'm doing. Again, my parents are not going to buy me a car because the insurance is too expensive. It's not the car, it's the insurance. My guardians are not going to put me in for their insurance bc the insurance goes up if i get a ticket. I need a vehicle to go places for school classes(two) that I take and maybe just outside for fun:) that's why I bought the motorcycle, Cheap everything. They will eventually see me riding a motorcycle. World is small. Thanks to everyone, I've decided to save my money to take the motorcycle safety course. Yesterday was my first time on the road, I made some mistakes, but I think I really rode it safely and I will keep be riding safely. I'm probably going to tell my parents and my guardians I have a motorcycle soon:)
:emot-ughh:

Presumably you'll be wearing a full-face helmet, armored jacket, armored pants, gloves, and actual motorcycle boots, so unless you're wearing a sign with your name on it, how would they know it's you?

Also, this right here:
I made some mistakes, but I think I really rode it safely
is a clear indicator that you were anything but safe. Park the bike before you seriously hurt yourself or someone else. Once you've taken the class, go practice in an empty parking lot, get your endorsement, practice some more, and then hit some less busy streets. Riding a motorcycle is a skill and it requires muscle memory - you're not going to learn that in one or two days, it's going to take months before you're really proficient at the basics. And, even then, you're never going to stop learning or improving - there's a reason MotoGP riders never stop training.
 
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Justindsds, I am not sure if you were joking or really serious about not taking the MSF course because they are too expensive. Hope you were joking. If you are serious though, please take any safe courses (including ones offered by the MSF) before you ride in the busy street. If you can afford to buy a motorcycle, you should be able to afford safety course especially the courses like offered by the MSF are quite affordable.



I know money is an issue for most of us, but we are talking about your life here !

Also, please wear protective gears on top of the helmet even for a short distance ...
 

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:emot-ughh: Fail to see why anybody is continuing to respond to the posting.


It has turned senseless and does not pertain at all to the original subject . :eek:fftopic:


I think folks should move on to other topics from people that have serious questions and issues with their bikes. :excl:
 

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Motorcycling is risk. Anyone is willing to take a different amount of it. Clearly, the OP is willing to take the risk of teaching himself on public roads to save a bit money. As long he's on the street legally, I don't see why not. I've done it too, when I was 20.

For me, it's kind of funny to hear people say: Hey! Watch out! Don't take that much risk! Take only as much risk as I take!
If you want to be safe, don't ride at all. If you ride, you're taking risk, so why tell the others not to take risks?
 

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I agree about the risk part, but back in the day when we learned (1970s) I don't think things we as intense as they are now. Distracted driving and driving while texting wasn't a thing, and I don't think people were as impatient as they are now. We didn't have MSF to teach us.

I don't know about you, but I knew how to ride before hopping on a street bike. Starting on dirt bikes before my teens taught me all about control and crashing, and the street had so much more traction!

Times have changed, and depending on where you live just hoping on a street bike and teaching yourself to ride can end poorly.

I always suggest at least a class of some kind, and better yet some time on a small dirt bike. That way you learn to operate the controls proficiently and with dirt experience you learn what to do when you lose traction and the cycle wants to go its own way.

I made my boys drive a car without incident for a year before getting their cycle permits. They weren't too happy about it, as they had been riding dirt bikes since about age 4.

If you aren't a good driver, you certainly won't be a good rider.
 

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Motorcycling is risk. Anyone is willing to take a different amount of it. Clearly, the OP is willing to take the risk of teaching himself on public roads to save a bit money. As long he's on the street legally, I don't see why not. I've done it too, when I was 20.



For me, it's kind of funny to hear people say: Hey! Watch out! Don't take that much risk! Take only as much risk as I take!

If you want to be safe, don't ride at all. If you ride, you're taking risk, so why tell the others not to take risks?
I agree with you that it's a risk. If someone is willing to take a risk themselves, that's on them. I also agree with you that no one has the right to tell someone else how much risk they should take based on their own comfort level. We've all done something stupid and risky, sometimes we get away with it and it's a cool story, sometimes not so much.

However, if someone who has no experience on a motorcycle elects to take to the public roads to teach themselves and "make a few mistakes" is not only stupid and risky, it's negligent and selfish in my opinion.

If he wants to take that risk for himself that's fine, go practice in a big parking lot or where ever. But to put others in danger because he's not willing or able to pay to be properly trained to use an inherently dangerous machine on public roads is idiotic.

I have no emphaty for him if he hurts himself under those conditions, especially after he reached out for advice and disregarded the advice received. I would feel sorry for his family, maybe if he does reach out to them they might help him with the cost of training...as a parent myself I would rather help my child do something like riding a motorcycle safely rather than risk him doing it on his own. But if he hurts someone else, well I'm sure many will agree with me that I hope he gets his due from that.
 

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Motorcycling is risk. Anyone is willing to take a different amount of it. Clearly, the OP is willing to take the risk of teaching himself on public roads to save a bit money. As long he's on the street legally, I don't see why not. I've done it too, when I was 20.

For me, it's kind of funny to hear people say: Hey! Watch out! Don't take that much risk! Take only as much risk as I take!
If you want to be safe, don't ride at all. If you ride, you're taking risk, so why tell the others not to take risks?

I completely agree....sort of! :)


In this particular case I chose to take a completely different view, mainly because of these few words in OP's initial post (which in its totality was only three short sentences long):


"... I've never rode a motorcycle so I'm worried."
 

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Just to add my $0.02

I recently learned to ride, too, and got a Ninja 300 after going through a couple scooters. I've been a cyclist for a long time, worked as a bike messenger for about 10 years. It's a pretty standard pre-req for endorsement courses to 'have the ability to ride a bicycle', but what they don't say is that the sharper that ability is, the easier it'll be to transition. So, if you don't ride a bicycle bike much and have some time, I'd say ride one a bunch before the course starts. If you have panniers, use them for groceries or whatever - it's a little bit more like the feel of having a heavy motor attached to the frame, in terms of balance & steering.

Also a tip from the other bike world, two things are just the same on motorcycles; if there's anything to watch out for the most in terms of maintenance, it's the brake and the chain (or belt). The brakes because obviously, being able to stop well is paramount to safety. The chain, because it'll cost way more if you let it stretch & wear out the sprocket/cog, + on the motored bike it can potentially whip your leg to shreds if it breaks.
 

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The chain, because it'll cost way more if you let it stretch & wear out the sprocket/cog, + on the motored bike it can potentially whip your leg to shreds if it breaks.
If the chain breaks, it can also wrap itself around the back wheel and cause you to stop rather suddenly and unexpectedly.

Loose chains can cause a very bad day, too.


Moral of the story: maintain that chain!

I managed to lose the master link clip off of mine on a day that I wasn't exactly riding in the way everyone expects of a middle-aged woman. When I returned home, the husband unit popped the bike up on the rear stand and went to clean and lube the chain while I peeled off my gear. And that's when we noticed the clip was MIA. I must have an amazing guardian angel, because the chain never came undone. Now I have safety wire on that sucker because damn, not pushing my luck twice.
 

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Hey guys, I got bought my 2013 ninja 300 today. Since it's my first bike and I've never rode a motorcycle so I'm worried. Can anyone tell me what I have to do with the maintenance with ninja 300? Thanks :)
Taking the safety course isn't required, but you damn well better seek out the knowledge you would gain from it and P R A C T I C E it at least 2 times a week.


Ride under your limit ALWAYS and practice frequently. Do that and you'll be fine.
 
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