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Discussion Starter #1
New to the forum, but I'll look for ways to start contributing on helpful topics I have experience with.

Question to track guys, I'm just starting track riding and moving out of the "for-looks" phase, but I'm committed to it as a new lifestyle/hobby -IYO is it worth it to sink money in quality race parts into the ninja 300 or just upgrade to a already more track ready bike?

Background is, after getting acquainted with some superbike shop guys and track coaches, I now have the upmost respect and appreciation for building up track bikes with quality parts for safety and performance. That being said, I've put about 700$ in entry level race parts and getting to the point where now I need to start replacing my cheap Amazon/ebay Chinese made parts. All said and done, i'm looking at dropping another 1000$ on the bike to get it truly track ready.

Should I just drive on or consider upgrading now and putting my money towards something bigger, don't want to say better. The shop has 17 and 18 GSXR 750s going for under 9k right now, and there's also plenty used out there.

Current setup:
(Quality stuff)
Nissin 15mm front Master Cylinder
Coretech steel brake lines
EBC Brake pads
RaceTech springs, 85
15WT fork Oil
Dunlop Q3+ tires (being shipped)

(Chinese stuff I bought for looks and should replace)
Mussari Slip On Exhaust
Chinese Clip-ons
Chinese Rearsets

Replacement parts wanted are woodcraft clip ons and rearsets.

cheers.
 

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If you get a new bike you'll want to upgrade it as well. Never ending cycle ;)


Agreed!

Also sounds like you have a really good setup already.

I suggest sticking with the ninja for the track since it’s dirt cheap to fix in case of an off (trust me, I know), and spending that 1000 in top quality gear, advanced riding schools, and track time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the feedback! I think I'm going stick with the 300. Posted the bike for 4200 on craigslist but got cold feet when a buyer called. I ran into my brother last night by chance, he built and tracks a ducati 1198 and offered a good point of view. He said stick with the smaller bike as you can push it to it's limit more often on the shorter tracks we ride.

He also said once I start track riding more I'll get better at picking out generally good advice from bias opinions. I'm realizing I need to take everyones opinion with a grain of salt, even coaches and track vets - bigger vs smaller bikes, frame sliders good or bad, ebay parts vs name brand. Etc etc. As long as you put the money in the parts that matter the most in causing you to eat it you're on the better side of fortune. Focus on getting better and going faster.
 

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Your setup looks just fine for a simple track bike. No need to spend money unless you have too. If you break something, then upgrade.

You’ll also love the Q3+. Dunlop specs call for 34f/36r psi hot. I just ran mine at 34f/33.5r psi hot and loved it, but will still mess with the pressures as the year warms up.

The best part about these bikes is the maintenance is very low. Basically oil changes and check everything over, type low. Tires last forever on these, along with everything else. I do recommend upgrading the clutch plates/frictions and springs. If you get a 600/750/1000, expect rear tires to chew up every 1-3 track days (depending on your abilities) plus wearing of clutch plates, chains, sprockets and various other components. a lot of things get very expensive, very quickly on the bigger bikes.

Go out and have some fun.
 
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He said stick with the smaller bike as you can push it to it's limit more often on the shorter tracks we ride.
It's far more fun to be the fast guy on a slower bike than to be the slow guy on a big bike. It's a track day - go out and have fun with it.
 

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It's far more fun to be the fast guy on a slower bike than to be the slow guy on a big bike. It's a track day - go out and have fun with it.
It makes my day to pass big bikes on my 300. :roll2smilie:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Your setup looks just fine for a simple track bike. No need to spend money unless you have too. If you break something, then upgrade.

You’ll also love the Q3+. Dunlop specs call for 34f/36r psi hot. I just ran mine at 34f/33.5r psi hot and loved it, but will still mess with the pressures as the year warms up.

The best part about these bikes is the maintenance is very low. Basically oil changes and check everything over, type low. Tires last forever on these, along with everything else. I do recommend upgrading the clutch plates/frictions and springs. If you get a 600/750/1000, expect rear tires to chew up every 1-3 track days (depending on your abilities) plus wearing of clutch plates, chains, sprockets and various other components. a lot of things get very expensive, very quickly on the bigger bikes.

Go out and have some fun.
Just got the dunlops on yesterday and going out to break in today after the streets warm up a bit. It's crazy to see/feel the difference from the stock tires. Gonna give the stock psi specs a shot and try to dial it in from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks again to everyone for the reassurance.

I just got some good news that my buddy is PCSing(moving) back to my area and is wiling to sell me my old SV650 back for $1500. Between that, the ninja, and a supermoto setup for my drz400 I think the stable is looking pretty respectable until I hit this powerball lotto or something.
 

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Thanks again to everyone for the reassurance.

I just got some good news that my buddy is PCSing(moving) back to my area and is wiling to sell me my old SV650 back for $1500. Between that, the ninja, and a supermoto setup for my drz400 I think the stable is looking pretty respectable until I hit this powerball lotto or something.

Congratulations on the bikes . :yahoo:


GOOD LUCK ON THE LOTTO :excl: YOU are going to need it. :signlol:
 

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Thanks again to everyone for the reassurance.

I just got some good news that my buddy is PCSing(moving) back to my area and is wiling to sell me my old SV650 back for $1500. Between that, the ninja, and a supermoto setup for my drz400 I think the stable is looking pretty respectable until I hit this powerball lotto or something.

The sv650 is a hell of a good all around bike and even better track bike. >:)
 

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Actually if you are really fond of track riding and is a rough driver it is like you have to upgrade your bike time to time as it is much needed. Even if the maintenance is good I would suggest to upgrade your bike.
 

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I like to put the big money in track time and maybe coaching, and spend as little as possible in upgrades and performance stuff.

Track time is what will make you a better rider.

When you're done with the N300, then you can get a bigger bike.

As for the coaching, I prefer to read, see, chat and try. I don't like to pay anyone to tell me what I can read in books. But personalized coaching is sure a great thing, especially if you're aiming to compete.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Welp, after two days of a racer practice and a ducati sponsored track day, I think I'm going to trade up. This bike is fun. It's a blast chasing down bigger bikes. This 300 has probably done more for my braking and corner entry speed than if I would have started on track riding with something bigger. But, I want to use this year to find out where I'm at and what I want to do with this sport. I've been mixed in with race practice, both wera and moto e juniors and I'm keeping pace through 3 quarters of the turn then they're gone. It's both exciting and frustrating. Theres really on been one girl who was whipping my ass on her 400.

The other thing is, I'm starting to see the high dividends that go with coached riding and classes rather than just track day practice. I've only been on track for 3 days with coaching but I'm running circles around some guys who have been at this for years just tracking it. I met a moto a coach that I work well and agreed to work 1 on 1 this year privately. But, there's that half-spoken tension in the air of how much we can really push on the 300. Again, I can stay glued to his ass through the corner but he always has to look back after and match his speed (really he just waits for me to pass than blows past me on his penigale. I think if I was just going as a track enthusiast I would be happy with the 300. But since I want to get the most out of coaching and training this year, I'm gonna go up to a 600 and see where things go.

This has been a great experience. I have have no history or friends in motorsport so coming at this sport completely fresh is challenging. I've got some flat track training and motoX training scheduled as well to get started with dirt for the first time too. I think by the end of the year I'll have a better picture of where I want to go.
 

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It’s all good man. I have been on liter bikes all my riding life (20+ years) and with our more tight, technical tracks here, I love the 300over my Ducati. To me, it’s a fun challenge to overtake the bigger bikes. At faster tracks like COTA or the former Texas World Speedway, I only use my Ducati, because that’s where it shines. To be honest, if you take away the straights, I’m faster on my 300 than the Duc. :surprise:

A 600 or even something like a SV650, might give you that balance you really want. There are a lot of options out there, you just have to find that medium that fits the bill.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I like to put the big money in track time and maybe coaching, and spend as little as possible in upgrades and performance stuff.

Track time is what will make you a better rider.

When you're done with the N300, then you can get a bigger bike.

As for the coaching, I prefer to read, see, chat and try. I don't like to pay anyone to tell me what I can read in books. But personalized coaching is sure a great thing, especially if you're aiming to compete.
I find this interesting. I too prefer to do my own research and trial and error, but I went against the grain with track riding and did nothing but coached lessons every time I've been out. I did pay for it, yes, but without those experienced I wouldn't have met the person I'm going to continue to work with. And there's no way in hell I'd be improving as well as I think I am.

It's weird actually, normally I'm prefer to stay quiet, sit back, think, and observe. But on the bike, talking to myself out loud was the key to focusing in on what I was being told to do, and actually doing it. Constantly, and at every corner. My coaching has always been a drink from the fire hose teaching style as opposed to say a more structured class like California Superbike. But saying out loud all of the one liners in progression through every turn is what really turned it on for me. That, and seeing how shitty my form was after half of my first day and being completely embarrassed. In my head I thought I was leaning off enough but really I was no where close. Stuff like, get air between your crotch and the bike, sweep the chest, chin to inside wrist, outside bicep to tank, weight off inside peg, etc. I'm not sure I would have found just reading and chatting it up in the paddock. I will say though, I dropped more time in one day of racer practice in thunderstorms than I did in both my regular dry track days. less crashes out there too.
 

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I almost traded in my Ninja 300 for a 2019 ZX6R, you would think the bigger faster bike would be the answer to all your woes and much better results from upgrading but I do not find that to be the case for me. I have started personalizing and upgrading my 300 and it just got 26000 miles turned over. it's in great shape runs superbly gets a hundred miles to the gallon and I don't think I could ask for a better bike. And like some of the previous posts it is super cheap to put parts on to repair and do maintenance. I have written all types of motorcycles, and nothing handles like the Ninja 300 and that has saved my biscuits more times than I can explain being able to whip around an obstacle or vehicle in a second. I feel like I would have seriously regretted getting rid of my 300 and at some point in the next year or so I will get a bigger bike and I'll keep the 300 because of personalized it and it would be a great backup bike later on. Never sell it!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I almost traded in my Ninja 300 for a 2019 ZX6R, you would think the bigger faster bike would be the answer to all your woes and much better results from upgrading but I do not find that to be the case for me. I have started personalizing and upgrading my 300 and it just got 26000 miles turned over. it's in great shape runs superbly gets a hundred miles to the gallon and I don't think I could ask for a better bike. And like some of the previous posts it is super cheap to put parts on to repair and do maintenance. I have written all types of motorcycles, and nothing handles like the Ninja 300 and that has saved my biscuits more times than I can explain being able to whip around an obstacle or vehicle in a second. I feel like I would have seriously regretted getting rid of my 300 and at some point in the next year or so I will get a bigger bike and I'll keep the 300 because of personalized it and it would be a great backup bike later on. Never sell it!
Have you been on the 2019? they're going for 8 grand on the floor at my dealership and are sexy looking, but I'm weary that they cut corners to hit that price mark. I'm leaning more towards investing in a race bike built/tuned specifically for me by a performance shop. I'm happy to work on the 300 all day, but if I pay 10-20k for a bike I don't wanna do a damn thing to it other than fluids and tires.
 

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I'm happy to work on the 300 all day, but if I pay 10-20k for a bike I don't wanna do a damn thing to it other than fluids and tires.
Then stick with the 300 :roll2smilie:

Simple rule of thumb; the bigger the bike, the more the maintenance.

That’s why these sub 400cc bikes are so popular in the racing world. You really do not have to do anything to them once they are set up and setting them up cost much less than the big bikes.

Basic rundown on my 300 maintenance:
Oil change every 3-4 track days
Lube chain before each track day

Flush brake fluid once a year or if it feels spongy
Replace Tires Once a year or so depending on age and wear.


My Ducati 996:

Oil change after every track day, maybe 2 if temps are cooler out.
Flush brake fluid every track day
Rear tire every other track day
Front tire every year
Chain every year
Check sprockets
Clutches when needed
Brake pads, once to twice a year
And I won’t mention stupid Ducati crap that breaks on them. :frown2:

Hanging out in the race pits and doing corner work:
600/1000cc bikes-
Chain breakage is common
Clutch problems
Constant tire changes
Constant tightening of bolts that vibrate loose.
Rapid sprocket wear/change
Some guys change their oil and during a race weekend.
Fork maintenance
Steering neck maintenance

The ultralight guys, I really never see a mechanical issue on the track. In the pits, I see guys checking tire pressure and a quick look over, then sit and relax.

I’m sure I’m forgetting some.

I’m not trying to talk you out of a bigger bike. I love riding my Ducati at cota and it’s nothing compared to the new ones, but my “jump on and go” bike is the ninja 300. Hell, when I go to cota, I still bring the ninja as a backup bike in case the duc is being a duc.
 
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