Kawasaki Ninja 300 Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Never being on a bike before, I bought a new 2011 Ninja 250r and wrecked it in the driveway. (I let the clutch out and it took off.) I wasn't hurt, but the way the bike skidded it trashed the transmission and the bike was totaled. (The bike never made it out onto the road.) I went ahead and signed up for the safety class and did not finish because everyone in my class had some experience riding and I was not comfortable with the bike because the class was moving too fast for me. I figured biking was not for me. However, ever since then when I see a biker I feel like a quitter and feel I need to master riding. I am thinking about getting a 300 ABS and signing up for the class again. What advise do you have? Also, I am 49 years old. Am I too old?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
Sign up for the MSF course before you buy any bike.

And I'm not just saying that because of what happened with your 250. This applies to everyone thinking of getting into motorcycling.

No, you're not too old. Not even close. My dad just started riding at 61.

- Sign up for the course (find a different one if you didn't like the instructors or routine of the previous program).
- Go to YouTube and watch all the videos you can about the basics of motorcycle riding.
- Go back to YouTube and watch more.
- When you take the course, F**K EVERYONE ELSE. Do not pay attention to anyone but the instructors. Some people have prior experience. Some people take to it easier. But those that don't can still very much get into motorcycling with a bit more effort and patience. Learn at your own pace. The instructors are there to make sure you pass. If you get frustrated or act stubborn, they can't help you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
Reminds me of my first ride. My step dad had me mount up, then came the instruction:

"Turn this to make it go. Pull in that to change gears. Watch out for the wall. " (No mention of stopping.)

So how did my firt ride end? Yeah, you guessed it - into the wall.

I was 14 then and that was 48 years ago. I've had many, many enjoyable hours riding since then.

Here's my 2 cents.

1. If you feel you need to do it then you need to do it.

2. Try not to be put off by your first experience.

3. MSF first. New bike second.

4. No, you're not too old.

5. Just ask yourself this; If not now, then when?

Believe it or not, you've already learned the most important skill - knowing when to back away and regroup.

Let us know how it all turns out!





Sent from my iPod touch using MO Free
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
Id say get a cheap bike go to a place with no others around and get some practice in. Nothing sucks more then a bunch of ppl around as you try to not crash this bike. Then take the class if you still need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
Id say get a cheap bike go to a place with no others around and get some practice in. Nothing sucks more then a bunch of ppl around as you try to not crash this bike. Then take the class if you still need it.
Sorry, but that is terrible advice in my honest opinion.

I'm a fairly introverted/shy/socially awkward/self-conscious person and I managed to survive the MSF course.

The MSF course is designed to start from ground zero. You are not expected to have any riding experience whatsoever or even know much about motorcycling at all. Mistakes are expected.

Nobody apart from instructors is paying attention to you, just like you're not paying attention to anybody but the instructors. Nobody is going to be pointing and laughing at you. Nobody is going to be hoping you fall and fail. Both students and instructors want to see you succeed so they can wave to you on the road someday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
We have forum members in their 60's that have 300's

I would recommend taking the course first, don't worry about your riding skills when I took my course a few people dropped the bikes and still in the ended up passing the course.

During the 3 day course we learned a lot of great things.

Day one was just class time and reviewing laws and riding procedures.
Day two was mostly just learning clutch control and friction zones.
Day three was mostly course review so we were comfortable when the actual course test started, It was broken up into three parts.

I had a great time and learned a few things and felt it was a great learning experience.

Again, the bikes they use were dropped numerous times (just looking at them you could tell) so don't worry about mistakes, especially since you already know not to fully let the clutch out until instructed to do so.

I think you will be fine, after the course you will be ready to get your beautiful new bike!

Good Luck and keep us updated!


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
"Screw them" is right. If you're struggling in the MSF course, any instructor worth their salt will take you aside alone and help you along with whatever is giving you trouble. On top of that, who cares about age? I was 25 when I took the MSF course, but there were guys who were easily in their 60s there with me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
Sorry, but that is terrible advice in my honest opinion.

I'm a fairly introverted/shy/socially awkward/self-conscious person and I managed to survive the MSF course.

The MSF course is designed to start from ground zero. You are not expected to have any riding experience whatsoever or even know much about motorcycling at all. Mistakes are expected.

Nobody apart from instructors is paying attention to you, just like you're not paying attention to anybody but the instructors. Nobody is going to be pointing and laughing at you. Nobody is going to be hoping you fall and fail. Both students and instructors want to see you succeed so they can wave to you on the road someday.
Sorry but in the us it may be a little different the class I have seen you each take turns in a line so every one is seeing what you do. And a girl got hounded hard for dumping the bike. So as a person that has seen the class id not take them tell I was comfortable on the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
i just finished mine today was 3 older people at least 50+ one person dropped thier bike no one said anything or laughed ...they just picked up the bike and we continued ....so unless your class is full of a bunch of immature people it will be fine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I just learned how to ride back this past November with the MSF course. I was lucky and had a pretty small class so that helped get better instruction time. When it comes down to it, it's all about you in the course and on the road. You don't start a new job without some training or learn a new skill without some mistakes along the way either. Take the course first and use their bikes so you don't kill a brand new 300. Either way, it's up to you but have fun and ride safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,130 Posts
Sorry but in the us it may be a little different the class I have seen you each take turns in a line so every one is seeing what you do. And a girl got hounded hard for dumping the bike. So as a person that has seen the class id not take them tell I was comfortable on the bike.
No I dont think it is any different in the US mate, I think you just went to a shit one with a shit group of people running it. You never, ever laugh or "hound" someone for doing anything, especially when you are running an instruction course. Shame on them. You can fix a bike, a human has more moving parts however........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
909 Posts
You never, ever laugh or "hound" someone for doing anything, especially when you are running an instruction course.
Amen. We had one guy (who was atleast 50 btw) go down in the u turn box. We all stopped. Killed out engines and say on our bikes while we let the instructors tend to him. He got up and back on the bike. And we carried on. Only thing that was mentioned about it afterwards was making sure he was alright. You're already embarrassed enough as it is, don't need others making it worse.





Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
To build confidence back up, I wouldn't hesitate to look at private lessons. Find someone reputable, who can teach you how to ride at your pace, in an environment where it's just one on one. Then, once your confidence level is back up, take the MSF and move on from there. Some people are different and learn differently. Not everyone does well in group environments. Also, age isn't a factor unless you make it a factor, therefore out of sight out of mind.

For whatever it is worth, here is my plan of action toward my ultimate goal of riding a motorcycle:

1. Get gear that protects me well (research thoroughly) and that will start me riding safely. (Check)
2. Read MSF material (and other related motorcycle material, watch informative youtube videos, forums, etc) before I sign-up for the MSF. By doing this, I'm better prepared because I'll have some familiarity with what they are talking about. [This is just how I am. I research anything and everything before I actually get involved in something.] (Working on)
3. Get motorcycle (Work in progress)
4. Seat time, practice, learn, repeat (Work in progress)

Ultimately, you need to find the pace that works for you, then make a checklist or goal (if necessary). It's like a bird trying to learn to fly, you weren't ready and tried to tackle too much at once. Slow down, take your time... what's the hurry?
 

·
I ♥ Borat In A Thong
Joined
·
981 Posts
I would say BECAUSE of your first experience to take the MSF course first. If you aren't the best, so what? My instructors asked people WHY they were taking the class, and 90% said for the insurance discount and/or court mandated. I said "Because I'm new and I want to learn how to be safer on the road and improve my skills."

But, I also started riding first. I JUST started riding December 2012 and I learned on my own. YouTube videos. I rode a dirt bike ONE time before, but that's really different IMO.

I also have a knack for naturally picking up almost everything I try. It's a trait I received from my father and it is very apparent when I am usually better at things than people who have been doing it for a while. (No I'm not saying I can beat someone on the track, but people who have been riding and seen me are shocked when I say 2 months and they think 5 years min.)

Would you rather be a "quitter" and physically be okay, or keep trying and screw yourself up? MSF first. If you don't come out with confidence and complete know-how, do it again with private lessons. THEN stop. I don't consider someone to be a "quitter" when they exhaust their options and choose safety/life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
Everyone has already covered some good points. However I'll just add this.

If you finish the safety course and you are still uncomfortable with your riding ability, I'd suggest you stick with a used 250 to prevent a potential financial loss. Without confidence in your riding ability, silly mistakes are likely. Low speed crashes are common in these situations, and although you are not likely to get seriously injured (ATGATT) your bike can just bleed you money from these mistakes if it is new.

But in the end it is all up to you :)
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top