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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

Newbie rider/forum lurker here.

Just got my 300 last week and I haven't been able to shake the notion of 'you're going to drop it... it's inevitable' from my mind.

Other than frame sliders (was looking at yoshimura( if anyone has any other suggestions I am all ears/eyes)) what would you suggest? I don't really know what parts are for what as far as parts go thus far and some help would be really appreciated.


Also I am looking to do my oil changes myself, what will I need other than an oil pan? (I know I need a peice of equipment to hold up the bike, and rear 'brackets' for it to prop up onto)

I'm sorry, I'm not very knowledgeable.

Thanks for your help.
 

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I would get the rear stand for oil changes, they are like $50 at cycle gear when they go on sale. Plus it will make other mods you do down the line much easier. I also put my bike on the stand when I'm not riding it, keeps it more stable.


As for protection when I got my bike, I was more worried about "visibility" by that I mean being seen and heard by cagers. This bike is very quiet, just by adding a slip on exhaust will make the bike 10 times louder than stock, I also installed projectors with HID lighting to be more brighter. Also reflective rim tape can help a bit and get you a little color as well.
 

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As for protection when I got my bike, I was more worried about "visibility" by that I mean being seen and heard by cagers. This bike is very quiet, just by adding a slip on exhaust will make the bike 10 times louder than stock, I also installed projectors with HID lighting to be more brighter. Also reflective rim tape can help a bit and get you a little color as well.
The only thing I don't like about the loud pipes saves lives thing is that in my experience, it doesn't work. Science tends to agree too. Your pipes are aimed backwards which is where a majority of the sound is going to go. Most vehicles now a days have better insulated and sealed interiors to block out road and tire noise and make the inside more comfortable. Plus better sound systems that will probably be cranked up. Add all this together and the average cager going down the freeway will probably not hear you till you are already within his danger threshold.

Try this little exercise next time you are in your car. If you catch a motorcyclist coming up from behind you in your mirrors who's working to pass you by, see where he is at by the time you clearly hear him and can differentiate him from the background road noise. In my car, even on some of the loudest and most annoying Harleys, I didn't hear them above the general road noise until they were about 2ft behind me to my left and on my rear wheel well on my right. Both are well within the danger threshold of my car and if I wasn't attentive and didn't see them, I would be taking that guy out if I decided to change lanes at that moment.

It's like a gun. The noise behind the barrel is no where compared to right beside and in front of the barrel. My GAU -2 50cal was pretty tame in sound from behind the spade grips. Would rattle my damn teeth out when I was sitting in the back of the helicopter and get progressively worse as he moved further back to aft stop. Exhausts are very much the same. The greatest amount of sound will be coming out and aimed out the back of the exhaust. This is GREATLY reduced from the front.

If you just like the sound though, no problem. I totally agree on that, but don't get it thinking that it being louder will make you safer from some cager up ahead of you. Only good situational awareness and preparedness will counter that.
 

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The only thing I don't like about the loud pipes saves lives thing is that in my experience, it doesn't work. Science tends to agree too. Your pipes are aimed backwards which is where a majority of the sound is going to go. Most vehicles now a days have better insulated and sealed interiors to block out road and tire noise and make the inside more comfortable. Plus better sound systems that will probably be cranked up. Add all this together and the average cager going down the freeway will probably not hear you till you are already within his danger threshold.

Try this little exercise next time you are in your car. If you catch a motorcyclist coming up from behind you in your mirrors who's working to pass you by, see where he is at by the time you clearly hear him and can differentiate him from the background road noise. In my car, even on some of the loudest and most annoying Harleys, I didn't hear them above the general road noise until they were about 2ft behind me to my left and on my rear wheel well on my right. Both are well within the danger threshold of my car and if I wasn't attentive and didn't see them, I would be taking that guy out if I decided to change lanes at that moment.

It's like a gun. The noise behind the barrel is no where compared to right beside and in front of the barrel. My GAU -2 50cal was pretty tame in sound from behind the spade grips. Would rattle my damn teeth out when I was sitting in the back of the helicopter and get progressively worse as he moved further back to aft stop. Exhausts are very much the same. The greatest amount of sound will be coming out and aimed out the back of the exhaust. This is GREATLY reduced from the front.

If you just like the sound though, no problem. I totally agree on that, but don't get it thinking that it being louder will make you safer from some cager up ahead of you. Only good situational awareness and preparedness will counter that.
i would agree that its louder to the side and when the bike is in front of the

car thats obvious ....but most of the time when im driving and thier a person


with a nice loud bike behind me i will hear them before i see them and make me look out more
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is the additional benefit of having race stand stoppers? I saw them on yoshimura's website.

Also is there anything else other than frame sliders to help during a drop/low side crash/fall?
 

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Even with bar ends, frame sliders, and spools, you are still likely to damage mirrors, the exhaust, and fairings, to say nothing of bending the frame.

Preventative measures will do much more than some bits sticking off your bike.

Practice low speed maneuvers often and in low pressure situations, and always wear boots with heavy and very grippy tread on them so your feet don't slip while supporting the bike.

Also, get in the habit of looking where you step before supporting the bike with your weight. Look for potholes, sand, slick pavement, water etc as you come to a stop.

As a safety conscious rider with solid riding skills and a steady throttle hand, your biggest hazards will come from other drivers.

In which case, high-viz gear and keeping those reflectors on will likely save you or buy you precious road presence every time you're on the bike.

Ride safe!
 

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i would agree that its louder to the side and when the bike is in front of the

car thats obvious ....but most of the time when im driving and thier a person


with a nice loud bike behind me i will hear them before i see them and make me look out more
and how close was he to you when you finally heard him? How about when you finally spotted him while reacting to the sound? Was he actively trying to pass you at the time? Like I said, at highway speeds(65-85MPH,) I have never hard a bike in time that would have prevented me from totally hosing the poor guy if I had not looked first. With the average of 70dB of noise inside of a car at highway speed on top of better sealing and insulation, you are not likely to hear even some of the loudest motorcycles until it would be too late.

Even with bar ends, frame sliders, and spools, you are still likely to damage mirrors, the exhaust, and fairings, to say nothing of bending the frame.

Preventative measures will do much more than some bits sticking off your bike.

Practice low speed maneuvers often and in low pressure situations, and always wear boots with heavy and very grippy tread on them so your feet don't slip while supporting the bike.

Also, get in the habit of looking where you step before supporting the bike with your weight. Look for potholes, sand, slick pavement, water etc as you come to a stop.

As a safety conscious rider with solid riding skills and a steady throttle hand, your biggest hazards will come from other drivers.

In which case, high-viz gear and keeping those reflectors on will likely save you or buy you precious road presence every time you're on the bike.

Ride safe!
Agree 100%. Being proactive through training and situation awareness, will do more for you than added parts. Especially when things like frame sliders will actually cause more damage in a direct impact situation than they would have saved. Remember they are designed for the bike to slide across the asphalt. Not take a direct blow right on the end. Instead of spreading the impact load throughout the whole of the frame, you now focus that impact directly into that small area most likely tweaking the frame in the process.
 

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far enough back that i could see that they are comming up and not move in front of him like i said first thing i did was hear him then looked to see where he was so to say sound dosent matter is false
It is in my opinion also that sound doesnt matter all that much.

Blind people wont get a drivers licence but you can still get one if your legally deaf.......... just some food for thought.

We should all be riding like nobody can see or hear us. No matter how loud your bike is.
 

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Just got my 300 last week and I haven't been able to shake the notion of 'you're going to drop it... it's inevitable' from my mind.
I dont think it is "inevitable", I have been on bikes for 15 years and have never dropped any of mine (not even in the driveway :eek:) and I know others that have been riding 3 times as long that have never dropped theirs. Feel confident and comfortable in yourself and your abilities and you will be one step ahead of those people that do drop the bike after pushing themselves past their experience level.

I think I can, I think I can........... If you think that you are gonna drop the bike eventually, highly likely you will. Wrong mindset to be starting out with. Practice practice practice. And then when you have finished practicing and you think your a boss on your new bike..........practice some more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's exactly the mindset that I have for when I start riding.

When I get my bike I am taking time off work. I am going to go to a little parking lot near my condo and practice as much as I possibly can and then once I feel a bit more comfortable with turning/maneuvering/braking/starting from a stop then I will take it to the very dead yet long/beautiful roads near my house to practice riding on the road in an unpopulated atmosphere.

I appreciate everyone's contributions to the thread, many of you have been very supportive and helpful.

I dont think it is "inevitable", I have been on bikes for 15 years and have never dropped any of mine (not even in the driveway :eek:) and I know others that have been riding 3 times as long that have never dropped theirs. Feel confident and comfortable in yourself and your abilities and you will be one step ahead of those people that do drop the bike after pushing themselves past their experience level.

I think I can, I think I can........... If you think that you are gonna drop the bike eventually, highly likely you will. Wrong mindset to be starting out with. Practice practice practice. And then when you have finished practicing and you think your a boss on your new bike..........practice some more.
 
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