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Motorcycle Deaths Continue to Climb: Report
By -- Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 5,000 motorcyclists were killed on U.S. roads in 2012, an increase of about 9 percent from the previous year, a new report shows.

Last year's number of motorcyclist deaths is near an all-time high, and motorcyclists remain one of the few roadway user groups where no progress has been seen over the past decade, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report noted.

"In my state [Oregon], an improving economy and a longer window of nice weather meant there were more riders and riding days. The fatality increase is disheartening. Every motorcyclist deserves to arrive at their destination safely. These numbers represent real people -- they are family, friends and neighbors," Troy Costales, GHSA's immediate past chairman and head of Oregon's highway safety program, said in a GHSA news release.

The projected number of motorcyclist deaths for 2012 is based on state-by-state data for the first nine months of the year. Similar projections in previous years mirrored the final numbers.

Comparing the first nine months of 2011 and 2012, the report found that motorcyclist deaths increased in 34 states last year, decreased in 16 states and remained the same in the District of Columbia. Increases were seen in every region of the country and were quite high in many states. For example, motorcyclist deaths rose 32 percent in Oregon and 29 percent in Indiana.

With the economy improving, more people have disposable income for buying and riding motorcycles, the report noted. At the same time, high gas prices lead to more people buying fuel-efficient vehicles such as motorcycles.

The report also found a decrease in the number of states with laws that require all riders to wear helmets. That number is currently 19, down from 26 in 1997.

"All of the trends with motorcyclist deaths are really going in the wrong direction. This report is an urgent reminder that we must do more to address a problem that will only get worse with increased ridership. We are talking about 5,000 tragedies a year with no sign of progress," GHSA chairman Kendell Poole, director of Tennessee's highway safety program, said in the news release.

"The good news is that we know how to prevent crashes and the resulting injuries and fatalities involving motorcycle riders and their passengers. There are effective strategies that, when implemented, can make a difference," he added.

The report outlined a number of ways to reduce motorcyclist deaths. These include: increasing helmet use; reducing speeding and impaired riding; providing rider training to all who need or want it; ensuring proper licensing of riders; and encouraging all drivers to share the road with motorcyclists.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a motorcycle safety guide.

SOURCE: Governors Highway Safety Association, news release, April 24, 2013
 

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Motorcycle Deaths Continue to Climb: Report
By -- Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 5,000 motorcyclists were killed on U.S. roads in 2012, an increase of about 9 percent from the previous year, a new report shows.

Last year's number of motorcyclist deaths is near an all-time high, and motorcyclists remain one of the few roadway user groups where no progress has been seen over the past decade, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report noted.

"In my state [Oregon], an improving economy and a longer window of nice weather meant there were more riders and riding days. The fatality increase is disheartening. Every motorcyclist deserves to arrive at their destination safely. These numbers represent real people -- they are family, friends and neighbors," Troy Costales, GHSA's immediate past chairman and head of Oregon's highway safety program, said in a GHSA news release.

The projected number of motorcyclist deaths for 2012 is based on state-by-state data for the first nine months of the year. Similar projections in previous years mirrored the final numbers.

Comparing the first nine months of 2011 and 2012, the report found that motorcyclist deaths increased in 34 states last year, decreased in 16 states and remained the same in the District of Columbia. Increases were seen in every region of the country and were quite high in many states. For example, motorcyclist deaths rose 32 percent in Oregon and 29 percent in Indiana.

With the economy improving, more people have disposable income for buying and riding motorcycles, the report noted. At the same time, high gas prices lead to more people buying fuel-efficient vehicles such as motorcycles.

The report also found a decrease in the number of states with laws that require all riders to wear helmets. That number is currently 19, down from 26 in 1997.

"All of the trends with motorcyclist deaths are really going in the wrong direction. This report is an urgent reminder that we must do more to address a problem that will only get worse with increased ridership. We are talking about 5,000 tragedies a year with no sign of progress," GHSA chairman Kendell Poole, director of Tennessee's highway safety program, said in the news release.

"The good news is that we know how to prevent crashes and the resulting injuries and fatalities involving motorcycle riders and their passengers. There are effective strategies that, when implemented, can make a difference," he added.

The report outlined a number of ways to reduce motorcyclist deaths. These include: increasing helmet use; reducing speeding and impaired riding; providing rider training to all who need or want it; ensuring proper licensing of riders; and encouraging all drivers to share the road with motorcyclists.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a motorcycle safety guide.

SOURCE: Governors Highway Safety Association, news release, April 24, 2013
really this is news? As more ppl ride motorcycles more are going to die on them no mater what. That's like saying more ppl are being killed in car crashes now days as we had in the 1950.
 

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Motorcycle Deaths Continue to Climb: Report
By -- Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 5,000 motorcyclists were killed on U.S. roads in 2012, an increase of about 9 percent from the previous year, a new report shows.

Last year's number of motorcyclist deaths is near an all-time high, and motorcyclists remain one of the few roadway user groups where no progress has been seen over the past decade, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) report noted.

"In my state [Oregon], an improving economy and a longer window of nice weather meant there were more riders and riding days. The fatality increase is disheartening. Every motorcyclist deserves to arrive at their destination safely. These numbers represent real people -- they are family, friends and neighbors," Troy Costales, GHSA's immediate past chairman and head of Oregon's highway safety program, said in a GHSA news release.

The projected number of motorcyclist deaths for 2012 is based on state-by-state data for the first nine months of the year. Similar projections in previous years mirrored the final numbers.

Comparing the first nine months of 2011 and 2012, the report found that motorcyclist deaths increased in 34 states last year, decreased in 16 states and remained the same in the District of Columbia. Increases were seen in every region of the country and were quite high in many states. For example, motorcyclist deaths rose 32 percent in Oregon and 29 percent in Indiana.

With the economy improving, more people have disposable income for buying and riding motorcycles, the report noted. At the same time, high gas prices lead to more people buying fuel-efficient vehicles such as motorcycles.

The report also found a decrease in the number of states with laws that require all riders to wear helmets. That number is currently 19, down from 26 in 1997.

"All of the trends with motorcyclist deaths are really going in the wrong direction. This report is an urgent reminder that we must do more to address a problem that will only get worse with increased ridership. We are talking about 5,000 tragedies a year with no sign of progress," GHSA chairman Kendell Poole, director of Tennessee's highway safety program, said in the news release.

"The good news is that we know how to prevent crashes and the resulting injuries and fatalities involving motorcycle riders and their passengers. There are effective strategies that, when implemented, can make a difference," he added.

The report outlined a number of ways to reduce motorcyclist deaths. These include: increasing helmet use; reducing speeding and impaired riding; providing rider training to all who need or want it; ensuring proper licensing of riders; and encouraging all drivers to share the road with motorcyclists.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a motorcycle safety guide.

SOURCE: Governors Highway Safety Association, news release, April 24, 2013
Being a brand new rider(bike just arrived today), THIS IS NOT WHAT I WANT TO HEAR NOR READ
. Although this article is painfully true, it just encourages me more and more to learn to be a safer rider 24/7. I signed up like 2 months ago to take my MSF course in two weeks, i will for sure be attentive in the class for it may save my life or the life of someone else one day.
 

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really this is news? As more ppl ride motorcycles more are going to die on them no mater what. That's like saying more ppl are being killed in car crashes now days as we had in the 1950.
The "news" is that the death rates have gone up as helmet law requirements have been pulled back. Sure you could argue that more people are using motorcycles now than back in the day, but no one is really looking at the final death count, you can calculate a ratio of deaths in relation to the number of licensed drivers at any specific period of time and you'd still see that the death rates involving motorcyclists now are abnormally large in comparison to previous years when nearly every state required the use of helmets.

Another contributing factor in these deaths seems to be that a large number of people who die in motorcycle accidents are driving without a valid motorcycle endorsement on their license. Which I don't see listed in this snippet of the report.

Here is a more detailed list with the reasoning:
Specifically, the report recommends states address 6 issues:
* Increase helmet use: Helmets are proven to be 37% effective at preventing fatal injuries to motorcycle operators and 41% effective for passengers. NHTSA estimates that 706 of the unhelmeted motorcyclists who died in crashes in 2010 would have lived had they worn helmets.
* Reduce alcohol impairment: In 2010, 29% of fatally injured riders had a blood alcohol concentration at or above the legal limit of .08, the highest of all motorists.
* Reduce speeding: According to the most recent data, 35% of motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes were speeding, and almost half of these crashes did not involve another vehicle.
* Provide motorcycle operator training to all who need or seek it: While all states currently offer training, some courses may not be provided at locations and times convenient for riders.
* Ensure motorcyclists are properly licensed: NHTSA data reveals that in 2010, 22% of motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes did not have a valid motorcycle license. This compares with twelve percent of passenger vehicle drivers in fatal crashes. The motorcycle license test prompts many riders to complete a training course. By encouraging licensing, states encourage training.
* Encourage all drivers to share the road with motorcyclists: According to NHTSA, when motorcycles crash with other vehicles, the latter usually violates the motorcyclist’s right of way. Many states conduct “share the road” campaigns to increase awareness of motorcyclists.
 

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Drunk or stoned squids. No mystery here, but they are always looking for a reason to "do something" so expect more check points, more harassment in major cities, more BS in general, none of which will have any impact on the "problem". :cool:
 

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Drunk or stoned squids. No mystery here, but they are always looking for a reason to "do something" so expect more check points, more harassment in major cities, more BS in general, none of which will have any impact on the "problem". :cool:
Yep the fact is the only way to solve said problem is if you let the stupid ppl kill them self off before they can breed.
 

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This is how it starts, expect these stats to be used for harsher driving tests and tiered licensing laws for certain age groups. safety was always used as a reason in the UK/Europe to tighten up the laws on how old you had to be and what powered bike you could ride.
 

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Yep the fact is the only way to solve said problem is if you let the stupid ppl kill them self off before they can breed.
Thats a bit harsh, no?

Do the studies give age ranges for the highest risk group? I'd imagine the stats would be skewed towards inexperienced, teenagers going too big too fast and who typically don't have the finances to properly gear-up...

I'm still surprised we haven't adopted a tiered licensing scheme with limits on engine size.
 
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Thats a bit harsh, no?

Do the studies give age ranges for the highest risk group? I'd imagine the stats would be skewed towards inexperienced, teenagers going too big too fast and who typically don't have the finances to properly gear-up...

I'm still surprised we haven't adopted a tiered licensing scheme with limits on engine size.
How is it harsh? You control the bike I have seen tons of vids of people crashing on mopeds. Its like a gun it wont kill you it takes the stupid person using it to kill you.
 

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My second cousin rode bikes for 60 years beginning with a surplus Indian from WW2. His 3 brothers and one sister rode a lot as well. He told me the only time he had ever been down was when he hit black ice on the shady side of a mountian in the Rockies.

He and all of his siblings (4) are now old and 3 of them have passed away from age related problems.

Bottom line is he rode 300k miles himself, probably over a million for the 4 brothers and one sister. I don't think any of them was ever seriously injured while on a bike.
Situational awareness is the key and if you ride defensively and are constantly aware of what is going on around you, it is entirely possible to avoid any serious injury on a bike, for the rest of your life.

He owned a Yamaha dealership in Key West Fla, and raced bikes when he was young. He was on the carrier Hornet when they launched the Dolittlke raid, in fact he was on that ship when it was comissioned until it was sunk.

In reading posts on this forum, you can tell from the attitudes of some that they are in for a rough bike riding career.

regards
Mech
 

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I would like to know what the percentage of motorcycle deaths are due to in attentive, careless automobile drivers. I bet you it's high.
 

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My second cousin rode bikes for 60 years beginning with a surplus Indian from WW2. His 3 brothers and one sister rode a lot as well. He told me the only time he had ever been down was when he hit black ice on the shady side of a mountian in the Rockies.

He and all of his siblings (4) are now old and 3 of them have passed away from age related problems.

Bottom line is he rode 300k miles himself, probably over a million for the 4 brothers and one sister. I don't think any of them was ever seriously injured while on a bike.
Situational awareness is the key and if you ride defensively and are constantly aware of what is going on around you, it is entirely possible to avoid any serious injury on a bike, for the rest of your life.

He owned a Yamaha dealership in Key West Fla, and raced bikes when he was young. He was on the carrier Hornet when they launched the Dolittlke raid, in fact he was on that ship when it was comissioned until it was sunk.

In reading posts on this forum, you can tell from the attitudes of some that they are in for a rough bike riding career.

regards
Mech
From one old rider to another.........I could not have said it better myself sir.....
 

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I would like to know what the percentage of motorcycle deaths are due to in attentive, careless automobile drivers. I bet you it's high.
Probably little doubt about that but unfortunately idiotic, distracted drivers and prozaic soccer moms are a given and we as riders can't control them. We can only control how we react to them. My personal take is that a lot of newly licensed riders can barely ride the bike effectively in a straight line or parking lot, let alone manage risk and emergency situations.
 

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I think that if ur on a bike u have to be aware at all times u cant be like in a car not paying attention and getting distracted ...u have to be scanning ur surroundings at all times and be very attentive all it takes is a couple of seconds of u not looking and that could be ur life. I know guys that died in bike accidents that were caused by people not paying attention in there cars and that could be any of us so ride safe and be on ur toes at all times
 

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How is it harsh? You control the bike I have seen tons of vids of people crashing on mopeds. Its like a gun it wont kill you it takes the stupid person using it to kill you.
I don't disagree, it certainly takes an inexperienced person riding beyond their limits to kill themselves.

But I don't agree with the notion that letting such people die (when preventable through tiered licensing) is good for the motorcycle community. You can point to this as being an instance of natural selection requiring complete apathy from 3rd parties; but I'd rather see those deaths prevented so that everyone can enjoy a long life of motorcycle riding.

The only caveat is that those with a death wish (potentially unpreventable behavior) will likely not benefit from any safety measures...
 

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Increase helmet use: Helmets are proven to be 37% effective at preventing fatal injuries to motorcycle operators and 41% effective for passengers. NHTSA estimates that 706 of the unhelmeted motorcyclists who died in crashes in 2010 would have lived had they worn helmets.



this might be the reason why helmets are compulsory in Australia and have been for years
 

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It's not shocking to me at all a majority of motorcyclists I meet treat everyday street riding like a race almost every time I see riders in my town they're always doing something crazy dangerous some dude almost slammed into an f150 because he wanted to get in front of them and the truck driver was easily doing 50 on 40mph road but no that wasn't fast enough for the cyclist he just had to try and cut him off to get ahead I guarantee if that dude would've turned his head to talk to his passenger or change his radio station he would've accidentally clipped the guys rear tire easily


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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If you're riding in the street. You better start being a student of roadcraft. It's a skill in itself to be aware and mindful of traffic conditions.

Simply rolling around hoping you don't go down isn't enough.
 
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