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Discussion Starter #21
First thing i did to my bike was put in some oggy knob frame sliders - can be used on an ABS bike and you don't have to cut the fairings. you can see it in the following photo.
next i put on a musarri slip on - which i changed out for a yoshi full system and PCV and K&N. then i put on some S/S brake lines and new pads along with new brake fluid.

I like the look of the musarri, probably my most favorite I've seen. I'm not wanting a slip on for the loudest sound, I'm wanting it more for safety. Did you like you musarri? You said you changed it out? Did you sell the musarri? I don't like flashy, and don't like to turn heads by how obnoxiously loud my bike is. I like a clean look and sound. You're bike is nice. I also like your oggy knob frame sliders, they are hidden well.
 

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I like the look of the musarri, probably my most favorite I've seen. I'm not wanting a slip on for the loudest sound, I'm wanting it more for safety. Did you like you musarri? You said you changed it out? Did you sell the musarri? I don't like flashy, and don't like to turn heads by how obnoxiously loud my bike is. I like a clean look and sound. You're bike is nice. I also like your oggy knob frame sliders, they are hidden well.

yeah I changed my musarri and got the yoshi because I wanted a full system for more HP. I think they sound similar, the musarri is pretty loud with the baffle in or out - i think they sound awesome when it's going past - however drives in a cage would hardly notice the sound till you get past them. Yet to sell the musarri though, haven't found a buyer. and yeah the frame sliders go well with the decal style on the side fenders; i think it's a sexy bike esp considering everything else i've done to it lol
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
yeah I changed my musarri and got the yoshi because I wanted a full system for more HP. I think they sound similar, the musarri is pretty loud with the baffle in or out - i think they sound awesome when it's going past - however drives in a cage would hardly notice the sound till you get past them. Yet to sell the musarri though, haven't found a buyer. and yeah the frame sliders go well with the decal style on the side fenders; i think it's a sexy bike esp considering everything else i've done to it lol
So are you saying it isn't the best if I mainly wanted it do people heard me coming?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
you should never assume anyone can hear you coming and always ride & think that nobody can see you & your invisible and you will live to ride a lot longer.a stebel airhorn is a great addition to any motorcycle to help wake cagers up

http://www.kawasakininja300.com/for...mounting-stebel-nautilus-compact-airhorn.html
I have never assumed others can hear me coming, it's simply another safety feature to protect me as you said the horn is another addition to alert others. I installed a 115db horn already, that was the first thing. Great advice, thank you.
 

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I have never assumed others can hear me coming, it's simply another safety feature to protect me as you said the horn is another addition to alert others. I installed a 115db horn already, that was the first thing. Great advice, thank you.

nice work, well done
 

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So are you saying it isn't the best if I mainly wanted it do people heard me coming?
Not that, just that the majority of the time people in cars probably wouldn't hear you. So if that was the main reason you wanted it you could save money and not do it, but I reckon do it - only cause they sound good, I didn't do mine for any safety feature lol
 

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Using a loud exhaust as a safety excuse is stupid. I had a full Akra on my r6 and still got merged into. If people have their windows up and music blaring, no exhaust will help you be "seen"
 

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Using a loud exhaust as a safety excuse is stupid. I had a full Akra on my r6 and still got merged into. If people have their windows up and music blaring, no exhaust will help you be "seen"
I don't think it's stupid, but humans who have more sensory input (noise) will hear you (and thus notice you) in more situations if you have a decent sound-signature than if you don't.

In essence, there's a very good reason why artificial noise-makers have been added to electric vehicles, or why trucks are designed to beep when backing up.

Granted, it won't work in all situations, but it will help in many.

As Cruizin' wrote, you should still assume cagers do *not* see you, just as it's safer to assume the shadow in the bush is a tiger than to assume it's not, because one assumption keeps you safer than the other. :D But, people still make noise to scare-off bears when tramping through the woods so they don't surprise one and get attacked.

The same principle holds true with noise on our bikes. It's no guarantee, but it helps. A horn is no guarantee (Stebel Nautilus or not) but it certainly helps, and moreso from the front where our bikes don't naturally have a good way of generating sound waves that go that direction apart from a quality horn.

There will be non-ideal locations where people won't hear your exhaust or your horn, as sound is omni-directional but it generates stronger pressure waves to one's eardrum as if there's no interference or if we're in an ideal location in front of the source. You can hear a Marshall stack from behind (with noise coming through) but one can hear it much better from the front. As we run around the stack we can still hear it in varying levels relative to the pressure waves and our ears. In fact, that also tells us where this noise is relative to us.

So, with a bike that has a decently-noticeable exhaust, you simply will hear it more-easily than one that is very quiet. There's going to be diminishing returns here, and it's possible to have a bike so loud that it simply angers everyone around you, making potential road-rage where one was simply trying to be noticed. A 'reasonably' loud exhaust would be the compromise I look for, and have found, with my Yosh baffle-in full exhaust.

Even when I am cruising around in my rorty-sounding FIAT 500 Abarth—dozy and/or distracted cagers get an earful if they don't pay attention...and they notice me. Inattentive pedestrians get a little blip just so they know I am there...or people backing out of spots blindly might hear me as well. One person who was situationally-oblivious had her door-open, blocking a prime parking space. A little blip from the engine got her off the phone and closing her door. I was also concerned that she was going to close her door when I was in a position for her to hit my car or worse, she wouldn't be able to close it at all. She had no concept of what was happening around her. The sound of my blipping engine woke her RIGHT up.

Most people can hear, and so sound will always be effective at signaling one's presence. This should not be confused with best-practices as it pertains to surviving one's ride. Hi-Viz gear might help one be seen, but few would assume that one should rely on this, utterly, for 'protection' as cagers notice us and no longer pose a threat. The exact same argument applies to a reasonable sound-level.
 
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I'm only saying that people in cars would struggle to hear, pedestrians will clearly hear the bike, you mentioned electric cars have artificial noise makers and trucks have beeps for the reverse - they are mainly designed for pedestrians, not people in cars. I know when i'm driving in my car, i hardly hear a bike if it's behind me, as soon as it goes in front I know its there. So that's why i say using it as a safety excuse for cagers is a bad idea. Heck just use the excuse of wanting to have a loud exhaust. simple; i just don't buy the safety feature... + i want my bike to sound loud and sound good cause i'm the one riding it.
 

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I'm only saying that people in cars would struggle to hear, pedestrians will clearly hear the bike, you mentioned electric cars have artificial noise makers and trucks have beeps for the reverse - they are mainly designed for pedestrians, not people in cars. I know when i'm driving in my car, i hardly hear a bike if it's behind me, as soon as it goes in front I know its there. So that's why i say using it as a safety excuse for cagers is a bad idea. Heck just use the excuse of wanting to have a loud exhaust. simple; i just don't buy the safety feature... + i want my bike to sound loud and sound good cause i'm the one riding it.
It doesn't matter even if it's just pedestrians (which it's not). Even THAT makes it safer for you, because there's less of a chance that someone will step in front of you on the road, in a parking lot, in an underground garage, etc. :D Running over someone isn't just bad for the ped, it's bad for everyone. If a kid stops doing skateboard tricks near you because he/she heard you coming, that's a good thing. I say this as someone who was riding a stock Ninja 250 when some skate rat's board came careening in front of my front tire.

So, even IF we only reduce it down to pedestrians, a reasonable-level of sound is a net-gain for the rider's enjoyment AND safety. It's both, not just one.

But, there are conditions where cagers can and do hear you. Some cagers are in convertibles, some have windows down, some aren't listening to radio, some have exceptional hearing, some will verify seeing you with the noise of your bike, etc. There are some ways to minimize the effect of an exhaust and the noise-signature from a bike, but there are many ways people can and do hear you, and not just pedestrians.

If a loud(er) exhaust can't be said to improve one's safety, then High-Viz gear cannot be said to improve one's safety, or a horn for that matter (which spends most of its life not being sounded). Also, horns have a very different effect on people compared to a passive engine sound, because people can hear an engine or exhaust and save face, and a horn is punitive or startling and can result in anger (depending on location/predominant culture). Here in California, you're better-off using your engine noise than a horn, because people don't react as well to a horn. A horn used here is punitive and is only done on rare occasions, or when someone is pretty pissed-off. It depends on how you honk it though. A quick little beep can be a hello or a warning, but it's not common to use a horn as a warning either, unlike in some other locations.

We should not confuse 'ideal' noise with 'effective'. Exhaust noise is not always heard *ideally*, but it's most-certainly effective in more situations than a relatively quiet stock exhaust.
 

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We have lane splitting in CA and no matter what kind of exhaust I rarely hear sports bikes before I see them. Now Harley's on the other hand I hear and feel before I see, even with my music up.
 

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I don't think it's stupid, but humans who have more sensory input (noise) will hear you (and thus notice you) in more situations if you have a decent sound-signature than if you don't.

In essence, there's a very good reason why artificial noise-makers have been added to electric vehicles, or why trucks are designed to beep when backing up.

Granted, it won't work in all situations, but it will help in many.

As Cruizin' wrote, you should still assume cagers do *not* see you, just as it's safer to assume the shadow in the bush is a tiger than to assume it's not, because one assumption keeps you safer than the other. :D But, people still make noise to scare-off bears when tramping through the woods so they don't surprise one and get attacked.

The same principle holds true with noise on our bikes. It's no guarantee, but it helps. A horn is no guarantee (Stebel Nautilus or not) but it certainly helps, and moreso from the front where our bikes don't naturally have a good way of generating sound waves that go that direction apart from a quality horn.

There will be non-ideal locations where people won't hear your exhaust or your horn, as sound is omni-directional but it generates stronger pressure waves to one's eardrum as if there's no interference or if we're in an ideal location in front of the source. You can hear a Marshall stack from behind (with noise coming through) but one can hear it much better from the front. As we run around the stack we can still hear it in varying levels relative to the pressure waves and our ears. In fact, that also tells us where this noise is relative to us.

So, with a bike that has a decently-noticeable exhaust, you simply will hear it more-easily than one that is very quiet. There's going to be diminishing returns here, and it's possible to have a bike so loud that it simply angers everyone around you, making potential road-rage where one was simply trying to be noticed. A 'reasonably' loud exhaust would be the compromise I look for, and have found, with my Yosh baffle-in full exhaust.

Even when I am cruising around in my rorty-sounding FIAT 500 Abarth—dozy and/or distracted cagers get an earful if they don't pay attention...and they notice me. Inattentive pedestrians get a little blip just so they know I am there...or people backing out of spots blindly might hear me as well. One person who was situationally-oblivious had her door-open, blocking a prime parking space. A little blip from the engine got her off the phone and closing her door. I was also concerned that she was going to close her door when I was in a position for her to hit my car or worse, she wouldn't be able to close it at all. She had no concept of what was happening around her. The sound of my blipping engine woke her RIGHT up.

Most people can hear, and so sound will always be effective at signaling one's presence. This should not be confused with best-practices as it pertains to surviving one's ride. Hi-Viz gear might help one be seen, but few would assume that one should rely on this, utterly, for 'protection' as cagers notice us and no longer pose a threat. The exact same argument applies to a reasonable sound-level.
Pretty sure you could have summarized that a bit more.
 

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Defensive driving will help you more than a loud pipe to cover your mistakes.
 

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Defensive driving will help you more than a loud pipe to cover your mistakes.
Here's where we agree, Xtina. There's no replacement for best-practices when it comes to riding. Riders must be vigilant to avoid becoming road goo. All else being equal though, extra noise is a net-benefit, but there's a point at which noise can become obnoxious or polluting. There are diminishing returns here.

So, while Hi-Viz gear is a fine pursuit, one must still ride in a way that assumes cages (and others) don't see us.
 

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So, while Hi-Viz gear is a fine pursuit, one must still ride in a way that assumes cages (and others) don't see us.
sadly cage drivers dont look for us a lot of the time, High-vis gear or not

i tell you what is effective at making motorcycles be seen and that is what Australia post do to their honda CT-110 postie bikes

they shove a white flag pole on the rear of the bike about 6 foot tall and stick a triangle coloured flag on it either fluro yellow or fluro orange, and you can see them a mile, good height for cage drivers/truck/bus drivers to see the flag




here we go, this is how the vast majority of mail gets delivered around our Suburbs

powered by a throbbing 110cc naturally aspirated engine and delivering neck breaking horsepower to the rear wheel it can do 0 to 100 kmph in about 3 millisec.... um..er...aaahhh... weeks.
 

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LOL! There is an online video of someone on a postie bike trying to get it to 100kmh! By memory, I'm not sure that he even reached it! So I'd say, 3 weeks would be a pretty good estimate!...:D
 

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The first thing you should to is get a complete set of gear, your body is the one thing that can't be replaced. I have a set of leathers for riding in the canyons and some textile and kevlar gear for around town and going places.

Second is new tires, the stock tires suck, plain and simple. The tires are your connection to the road, and good tires will keep you safe and increase the performance capability of the bike.

Third is perhaps frame sliders and perhaps swing arm/fork/bar end sliders in case you go down to limit the damage to the bike.

Everything else is personal preference for the type of riding your doing and your personal taste.
"They say at 100mph water feels like concrete,
so you can imagine what concrete feels like."
this is perfect in every way....
 
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