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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a low-speed "collision" on my bike. I had about 1 month riding experience and about 855 mi on the road. I was on the lower floor of an airport terminal (where i work) riding through to a parking structure on the left. But i was cut-off near the entrance of the structure and i swerved, hitting a curb and landing on my right side. I fell off the bike, only small part of right leg was sore a couple days after. I don't think i hit my helmet or even scratched my jacket, just pants a little ripped.
This was about a week and a half ago, at which point I was really depressed about crashing my bike. I still ride my bike (can't keep away from it :D) Anyway here is a description of the damage:

From Front to Back:
Tire: Small dent on rim, no signs of wheel wobble afaik
Headlight area: Plastics may be swayed to the left (does not align with front wheel) Cowling damage below right headlight. Some tabs popped out, have extra spacing.
Right side mirror/Brake Lever/Bar End: Scratched
Front Brake Lever feels spongy, possibly air bubbles, need to bleed them.
Turn Signal: Broken, still works
Center Fairing: Lots of scratches/decal damage
Brake Pedal: Bent (may be hard to tell in pic)
Exhaust Shield/Exhaust: Dented, Scratched

I have learned to pay more attention to my surroundings and put all my focus into riding. And I regret not getting frame sliders. Will be included soon after I get everything done with insurance and all that.

PICS ATTACHED
 

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ouch!
mate insurance will fix the bike, main thing is your ok & hopefully learnt something from it as well. Its never nice to be in a bike accident no matter how big or small.Good on your for getting back in the saddle too, good job.
there there in that list that cant be replaced. keep us posted on the repairs
 

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Good to hear you are OK, parts are replaceable, having an accident and walking away priceless.
 

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I ♥ Borat In A Thong
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Damn. damn damn damn. How fast were you going in the parking garage?
 

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Sorry to hear. I find myself paying so much attention to traffic sometimes I get surprised when I later discover landmarks I've been driving by. Took me 3 weeks of commuting to notice I passed a police station almost daily....I should keep an eye out for those at least haha
 

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Eek. Well main think is you're okay, a sore leg is acceptable and much better than broken bones and such. As far as the bike, that does stink- no doubt about it; however, the plus size to cosmetic damage is it can always be fixed ;)

Keep your head up, and keep enjoying the bike.
Learn from the little mistakes now and you won't have to face bigger issues down the road :)
 

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I HATE parking garages for just this reason. Just yesterday, I was almost hit twice in my car by two different people driving the wrong way around the garage.
 

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Had a low-speed "collision" on my bike. I had about 1 month riding experience and about 855 mi on the road. I was on the lower floor of an airport terminal (where i work) riding through to a parking structure on the left. But i was cut-off near the entrance of the structure and i swerved, hitting a curb and landing on my right side. I fell off the bike, only small part of right leg was sore a couple days after.

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Is the person who violated your right of way, going to pay for the damages? No use having your premium go up when it should be theirs. For example, at the entrance of most parking garages, those turning past the entrance have to yield to those entering. There's usually a stop line or yield sign right at that corner of the entrance for traffic to your right/left. If that person just blew by that line, sign then they have failure to yield. If there was a stop line/sign there then they broke 2 laws. Failure to yield, and failure to stop. A third charge of reckless driving can be tossed in there as well. Either way, the police report would indicate that person at fault.
 

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Glad your alright, zip ties are your friend, get back on the road and invest in some frame sliders, they will save ya tons of $$$$$$
 

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Glad your alright, zip ties are your friend, get back on the road and invest in some frame sliders, they will save ya tons of $$$$$$
Well frame sliders aren't the end all be all either. You have to remember that the fairing's absorb impact and spread it out a bit before that energy moves onto the frame and engine mounts. When you install a frame slider, that energy is now being directed entirely onto the frame and engine mount. Also instead of being spread out like in a normal accident, it's being focused on very small points. Direct impact to a frame slider can torque the frame or crack a bracket or weld. All of which could potentially be a game ender for the bike. Or if your bike is sliding across the ground at a good clip and the slider catches on the lip of a curb or a small pothole in the street. That'll really torque a frame right there. When they were originally used for racing, they found they worked great for high speed low sides. The higher the speed the less the bike "slams" into the ground rather than lays into the ground. The impact is actually lower but the abrasion is greatly increased obviously due to much more inertia. Frame sliders work well on a track because the track's surface is very well maintained and barriers are at an absolute minimum. There is almost nothing to hang up a slider as it does its job on the track. Not so on the street. The road could have potholes, there are curbs everywhere, other vehicles in opposing lanes, and debris. Also at lower speeds you don't have that nice huge bit of built up inertia as you would at higher speeds, so rather than the bike laying down and sliding it has more of a tendency to do more flop like a fish and slam down. Frame sliders have their purpose and place. Their pros and cons. On a high speed low side frame sliders are awesome and quality ones are worth their weight in gold. Not so much in a low speed spill or an outright impact via being dropped right on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Damn. damn damn damn. How fast were you going in the parking garage?
That a lot of damage for being in a parking garage.
Is the person who violated your right of way, going to pay for the damages? No use having your premium go up when it should be theirs. For example, at the entrance of most parking garages, those turning past the entrance have to yield to those entering. There's usually a stop line or yield sign right at that corner of the entrance for traffic to your right/left. If that person just blew by that line, sign then they have failure to yield. If there was a stop line/sign there then they broke 2 laws. Failure to yield, and failure to stop. A third charge of reckless driving can be tossed in there as well. Either way, the police report would indicate that person at fault.
I was at the entrance to the parking garage, which was a 45-degree diagonal to the left of the road as opposed to a 90-degree turn. As i was approaching said 45 degree left hand turn i was about to be cut off, which i reacted to by swerving and resulted in hitting a curb and landing on my right side. I would say I was going between 15 and 25 miles per hour. The suv that cut me off kept going straight. And my insurance says since there was no impact from said vehicle it would make it somewhat my fault (and I would say the same).

Well frame sliders aren't the end all be all either. You have to remember that the fairing's absorb impact and spread it out a bit before that energy moves onto the frame and engine mounts. When you install a frame slider, that energy is now being directed entirely onto the frame and engine mount. Also instead of being spread out like in a normal accident, it's being focused on very small points. Direct impact to a frame slider can torque the frame or crack a bracket or weld. All of which could potentially be a game ender for the bike. Or if your bike is sliding across the ground at a good clip and the slider catches on the lip of a curb or a small pothole in the street. That'll really torque a frame right there. When they were originally used for racing, they found they worked great for high speed low sides. The higher the speed the less the bike "slams" into the ground rather than lays into the ground. The impact is actually lower but the abrasion is greatly increased obviously due to much more inertia. Frame sliders work well on a track because the track's surface is very well maintained and barriers are at an absolute minimum. There is almost nothing to hang up a slider as it does its job on the track. Not so on the street. The road could have potholes, there are curbs everywhere, other vehicles in opposing lanes, and debris. Also at lower speeds you don't have that nice huge bit of built up inertia as you would at higher speeds, so rather than the bike laying down and sliding it has more of a tendency to do more flop like a fish and slam down. Frame sliders have their purpose and place. Their pros and cons. On a high speed low side frame sliders are awesome and quality ones are worth their weight in gold. Not so much in a low speed spill or an outright impact via being dropped right on them.

Interesting points, have you had any personal experience or heard of anyone ruining their frame from an impact similar to that as you described? It makes sense that the force is not distributed throughout the frame and may bend it in the event of a direct collision, but just wanted to know if you have heard of it happening to anyone yourself/someone you know/ or online.

I will update with pics, and repairs, doing estimate today...
 

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I was at the entrance to the parking garage, which was a 45-degree diagonal to the left of the road as opposed to a 90-degree turn. As i was approaching said 45 degree left hand turn i was about to be cut off, which i reacted to by swerving and resulted in hitting a curb and landing on my right side. I would say I was going between 15 and 25 miles per hour. The suv that cut me off kept going straight. And my insurance says since there was no impact from said vehicle it would make it somewhat my fault (and I would say the same).




Interesting points, have you had any personal experience or heard of anyone ruining their frame from an impact similar to that as you described? It makes sense that the force is not distributed throughout the frame and may bend it in the event of a direct collision, but just wanted to know if you have heard of it happening to anyone yourself/someone you know/ or online.

I will update with pics, and repairs, doing estimate today...
The first part is difficult to picture. Did he come from the right hand side? Was he from a perpendicular road? Was he coming from the other way? Did either of you have a sign? How did he cut you off? There is a benefit to doing police reports. If he really cut you off and caused an accident because of it, then he was the cause. Someone failed to yield or performed an illegal unsafe act which started the chain. You made it sound like he was solely the cause by doing someone illegal and dangerous. If it was just a case of you not seeing him at first then it's a wash. If he was the cause and since he drove off, in some states is still considered hit and run. Non-contact does bring issues and make things harder with insurance, but someone causing an accident through gross negligence and dangerous acts is still at fault. There are many who believe that it's wrong to sue or find people at fault if the other person could have stopped in time or gotten out of the way in time, that they shouldn't be at fault. But the law generally sides with the fact that if you broke the law via ignoring right of way and causing a mental distressed state that then leads to that accident, they are still found to be the cause.

Next time this happens, file a police report and even better, see if you can get an officer to investigate the scene and get the report number. After a few days you can get a copy of the report and submit the report to the insurance company. Never trust the insurance company. They are going to do all they can to not pay you money and not spend any money in doing it. They will of course not pursue a hit and run or try and fight another insurance company solely for the fact that they were able to get you to concede easily and know they can stick it to you for more money down the road. We get insurance to protect ourselves from our own actions but never realize that our own shield has hidden blades pointed right at us. Although in your case you may be at fault here. I don't know since I can't really picture well on how it all went down and how you got cut off. You also seem to believe yourself at fault as well so who knows?

As far as frame sliders are concerned. It's basic general engineering. On everything designed to take an impact force, it will crumple or deform to absorb the impact and not allow it to spread beyond it. Or barring that, there will be some form of buffer or damper to absorb the energy. Frame sliders have neither. They are a strong, stout in materials and in design. They don't absorb any impact damage and will transfer that energy directly into where they are mounted to. They were originally designed for track use as awesome abrasion resistance. They were designed to allow the bike to slide as much as possible in order to prevent energy from the mishap, further being focused on the down side of the motorcycle. For sliding and abrasion resistance, frame sliders are awesome but it comes with a price. You now have a focal point for impact forces which goes directly into that point on the frame or bracket or housing assembly. Parts not designed to absorb an impact. The worse part is, your frame's integrity may be compromised after a simple drop and not even know it by looking at it. That impact could cause damage internally to the structure or even on the other side of the surface. Don't underestimate the amount of energy built up in the bike simply with it falling over.

Not saying that frame sliders are bad and don't get it. Just remember that it has it's purpose and it's negatives. It may not save your bike frame from a fall. It could even make everything much worse. But on a slide, there's nothing better than a properly designed slider. If you want to get a decent slider to protect against a slide, I would actually recommend Kawasaki's frame slider. It's designed the best to slide the bike. As opposed to most common after market sliders which are long cylinders which can act like levers on their mounting points. Proper frame sliders aren't about saving the fairings or mirrors and rearsets or whatever. They are about preventing abrasion from working through and damaging the frame or engine and headers.
 
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