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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone testify as to what the weight/load limit is for the 300? I'm at a tossup to deciding whether to get the ninja 300 or the 650 because the girlfriend has expressed interest in riding two-up occasionally. We're both large framed, I'm 6'2" 250lbs and she's 6' 225lbs, and I'm not quite sure if the 300 will be able to handle it. One other thing that will help though is we're both actively dropping some weight, I've made the deal with her that I can't get the bike until I'm down to 225lbs, still curious though.
 

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Sorry to say it, but both of you together are going to be too much for the bike. Max load is 397 lbs. The 650's weight limit is 400 lbs. My cruiser which is an 1100cc has a max load of 441 lbs. At almost 500 lbs the both of you together, would tax almost any bike suspension out there. That's not even including the added weight from gear. It would be easier to have her get her own bike and learn to ride herself. That way she can ride with you wherever you go and wont have to worry about overloading the tires and suspension. It's good to hear that both of you are trying to lose weight together. Keep at it and soon you'll both be able to ride 2 up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, had a feeling that was the answer, just one more reason my target weight is 200! Gotta get motivated, I really want to ride darnit :D
 

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You can ride anything you want solo at the moment. It may give you that extra kick in the pants to keep you motivated. Just keep in mind though, proper weight loss takes time. If you or your female companion lose a large amount of weight in a really short amount of time, go see a doctor. Both of you should be working with a doctor to ensure your diets and exercise routines are safe. Sudden, massive weight loss puts a lot of strain on the heart and other organs and can kill you if you aren't careful.

I would still suggest you get her to try and ride too. She'll find it much more enjoyable to have things in her own control and do what she wants to, while still keeping close and doing things with you. Good luck and keep us posted on how things are going. :D
 

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My 64 year old grandmother weighs 430lbs and she took my 300 10 miles up and down the freeway at around 80mph no problem. So there is that.
 

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That weight limit was established by the engineers for safe operation of the motorcycle. It's a combination of steering and control, suspension, and tire limitations. Going above the max load could really throw off your handling, damage your suspension, or cause a tire to explode or the bead to break when you hit a pothole. You should never operate any vehicle above it's established load limits.
 

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Load capacities, per manual (own both bikes)

FreeLancer is right: 2013 Ninja 300 = 397 lbs. 2012 Ninja 650 = 441 lbs. The 650 has another 82 lbs. of "curb mass" to begin with, so even though there is a performance gain, load carrying capacity doesn't increase much: a whopping 44 lbs. is all. May as well give curb weights listed: 379 & 461 lbs. The 650 is a bit portly in comparison (gixxer's are like 410 lbs for a 600 / 750, that's kinda light).
 

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The funny thing is though the higher the performance of the bike, the lower the load weight it's designed to handle. The higher performance sport bikes become much more sensitive to changes in it's CG(center of gravity) and the higher performance tires are designed on a lower weight limit for maximum performance and not strength to carry a higher load. Same with the higher grade suspensions. They are much more sensitive loads and shifting of those loads.
 

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Sorry to say it, but both of you together are going to be too much for the bike. Max load is 397 lbs. The 650's weight limit is 400 lbs. My cruiser which is an 1100cc has a max load of 441 lbs. At almost 500 lbs the both of you together, would tax almost any bike suspension out there. That's not even including the added weight from gear. It would be easier to have her get her own bike and learn to ride herself. That way she can ride with you wherever you go and wont have to worry about overloading the tires and suspension. It's good to hear that both of you are trying to lose weight together. Keep at it and soon you'll both be able to ride 2 up.
i am 300 pounds and when my wife was pregnant and weighed in at 185 we used to ride my old 2001 kawasaki vulcan 800 with 0 issues and would do so at 75+ mph no issue from suspension or engine drag
 

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i am 300 pounds and when my wife was pregnant and weighed in at 185 we used to ride my old 2001 kawasaki vulcan 800 with 0 issues and would do so at 75+ mph no issue from suspension or engine drag
Speaking from an Engineering perspective, there's lots more that goes into load limits than what the engine and suspension can handle for relatively short durations.
Also speaking from an Engineering perspective, "I did it before and it worked out fine" is not really good substantiation. I have lots of stories where everything worked out fine, until the one time it didn't...

Load limits are going to look at the impact on all systems, primarily structure (frame, etc.), suspension, engine, and brakes.
They are going to assess not only the immediate results (can the braking system stop 1000lbs in moderate conditions in a reasonable distance) but also the long term effects (how many cycles can the suspension withstand that load before failing).
Exceeding the load limits a few times, and taking proper precautions when doing so (give extra braking distance, etc.) is likely going to work out fine, but regularly overloading the motorcycle is going to cause things to fail much faster than designed. Fatigue analysis considers both loads and cycles. Increasing loads will decrease the number of cycles to failure. If you always overload the motorcycle, you are likely to damage the suspension or maybe even crack the frame way sooner than you would if you followed the limits.
To note, there is also generally a margin of safety applied to any limits. Not sure what standard margins are used in the automotive industry, but the calculated (or at least proved) limit is going to be higher than the posted limit.
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250 w/ 17' 300 engine, 07 EX500
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Or you just could get a Goldwing for 2 up riding only, like I did 👍 You can get an older model fairly cheap.

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Motorcycle Vehicle


My 1984 Honda Goldwing Aspencade aka "Siren" it's a 1200, has plenty of power, and comfortable for both riders.
 

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Or you just could get a Goldwing for 2 up riding only, like I did 👍 You can get an older model fairly cheap.

View attachment 115788

My 1984 Honda Goldwing Aspencade aka "Siren" it's a 1200, has plenty of power, and comfortable for both riders.
I like the look of the "old" wings much better than the new ones.
That, sir, is a nice looking touring machine.
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250 w/ 17' 300 engine, 07 EX500
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I like the look of the "old" wings much better than the new ones.
That, sir, is a nice looking touring machine.
Thank you, I got it cheap enough, but have sunk more into it than it's worth, but that was my plan because it's a keeper.

A great bike, and it's a Honda, it's as reliable as the universe is.
 
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