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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I spent less than $20 on this mod and about 6 hours taking my time to do everything as neat as I could. Buying everything via amazon links provided comes out to $62. Even if you need everything, this is a good choice over a prebuilt kit because these items have many uses, it's a heck of a lot cheaper and you'll end up needing some of this stuff anyway.

Tools used, (not including fairing removal)
Philips head screwdriver for on/off switch leads.
Wire cutters.
Wire strippers.
Solderless terminal crimpers.
Lighter for shrink wrap tubing.
10mm socket and ratchet for battery terminals.

These are the consumables I used. The only things I bought were the lights and the switch, I had everything else on hand from previous projects.
3amp was the smallest I had, the 22g wires should be able to handle 8 amps but why bother when 3 is sufficient. Buy a multi-pack in case you short short anything during installation.
Waterproof switch is a must for your outdoor product, otherwise it might rain on your bike, short the switch and your lights will come on an drain your battery ever so slowly. not to mention corrosion.
You'll be wanting to remove your fairing occasionally yes?
Use the dielectric grease on all your wire ends before crimping and also inside all your quick disconnects, it's slippery and is hard to wipe off so don't go crazy with it.
Good for sealing your LEDs in, the glue strip that they come with probably wont last long. Just let it dry before playing with it.
Electrical tape to wrap your wire runs and pigtails.
To connect the fuse holder to your hookup wire and battery.
http://www.amazon.com/NTE-Heat-Shrink-Black-Assorted/dp/B000FIDTW8/ref=sr_1_7?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1365915927&sr=1-7&keywords=heat+shrink+tubing+assortment
Use this to help weatherproof your solderless connections, just remember to slip it on the wire before crimping your connections and use the smallest diameter that will fit because it only shrinks to half its original size, a lighter will work but a heatgun is suggested.
http://www.amazon.com/Hillman-16-Rubber-Washer/dp/B008AY3OD8/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1365919801&sr=1-1&keywords=rubber+washer+7%2F16
For your switch, put on on either side of the plastic to help keep water off and not stress crack the fairing.

First you'll need to remove all of the side fairings and seat. Do a search for this and you'll find the service manual instructions.

The headlight doesn't need to come off completely but it helps to have it loosened. removing the whole front fairing and headlight is some sort of horrible dark joke so don't bother.

Don't forget this sneaky bolt on the bottom

Remove your battery cover/wire harness (one screw) and disconnect your terminals, Also I took this opportunity to install my battery tender lead, just slide it down through the storage compartment and through your seat bracket. I slipped the positive end through the red boot covering the battery terminal.

Next install your fuse holder and leave the fuse out for now, crimp a blue round terminal end to one side of your fuse holder. Remember to slip some heat shrink over the wire first and grease the exposed end of the wire. connect the end to your battery terminal through the red boot so it still covers the terminal, you can grease this too.
We're starting with this for safety reasons, shorted wires melt themselves and everything they're touching.

Next Run a wire from from your fuse holder to where you want your switch, I put mine next to the speedo, that's why I loosened the headlight. Just make sure where ever your switch is going there will be enough room underneath to run wires.
Cut your wires long in case you need that extra inch, and then run them along existing wire runs with zip ties.

Mark out a hole for your switch. I used a rubber washer to mark a circle, you could also use the rubber boot it comes with, just don't drill the hole that big.

Take a deep breath and irreparably drill a giant hole in your dashboard!
Make absolutely sure there is nothing behind to drill into.
My switch is 7/16" but all I had was a 3/8" drill bit, so I just drilled the hole and wiggled it around a bit. This fairing is really soft so be careful.


Add a wire lead to the other side of your switch for testing and then see if it fits in the hole you made. Use your rubber washers and screw your rubber boot on to to secure it.

Now you can make a temporary negative lead to the battery and use some alligator clips to wire up your LEDs and see if they work, red to red/black to black.

WARNING/CAUTION!
Always leave the switch in the OFF position when re-wiring to prevent any damage to yourself or your equipment.

After you connect everything plug your fuse in and your lights may come on, if not then flip your switch(now's a good time to decide which way you want "on" to be, I have mine as up is on down is off).
If your LEDs still don't come on then try reversing the connection and flipping the switch again (one of my LED strips was wired backwards, red to black, black to red).
If they still don't work then check all of your connections and try another set.
Still doesn't work? get some help!

CAUTION!
Keep the positive ends covered so they do not come in contact with anything to prevent a short.

While you have your LEDs out and powered up, turn the lights down and try things out to see where you want your lights to go. I started with the rear end.

I put my rear lights in the gap above the luggage hooks, I cut one strip down to 6 LEDs, cleaned the space out and stuck them in. I decided this was a secure enough spot to not need any extra glue. You can see where I ran the red wire from the light to the storage compartment.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here they are lit.

The black block where the signal wires run is rubber and will pull right out, if it's stuck grab an allen wrench and pull up with that from the bikes left side.
Pull the LED wires up through the hole and add some quick disconnects.

CAUTION!
Use both a male and female end on your LED leads to prevent connecting the wrong ends to your battery leads later on. (IE, I used a male end for all the LED positive leads and a female end for all the negative leads)

tuck them in next to that useless plug and we'll come back to them later.

Next lets do the front fender.
It looks a little tricky because of the wheel and forks but ends up being simple.

CAUTION!
When cutting your light strips be sure to cut them in a spot that will not interfere with the circuit.(My strips were made in circuits of 3 LEDs and 1 resistor with extended spots for soldering leads. Look at the back and you'll see the large flat spots for cutting)

I cut one of my strips in half minus 3 LEDs in the center. then I soldered new wires to the cut strip, peel back the rubber coating and use a knife to scratch some of the protective paint off of both sides of the end, make sure it works before installing!

WARNING!/CAUTION!
Be absolutely sure your LEDs will not come off your fairings and get tangled in your tire/brake/brakelines. A loose wire wrapped around your cheap rubber brake-line and your tire may cut the brake-line enough to make them useless.

Add enough wire to make it up to the tripple tree plus a foot or so.
I did this by connecting both sets of LEDs under the fairing into 2 wires with a Solderless connection (don't forget the grease and shrink wrap first) and then adding the wire to that.
Glue your LEDs onto the inside of the fairing wherever you wish, I did mine on the sides to light up the inside of the rim and brakes.
I only used tape on the top of the fairing because the fender bracket will be covering the wires when the fender is installed.

I ran my wires with a couple zip ties along the ABS line, I left the zip tie ends on for the picture.

Now add your LEDs to the left and right middle fairings and or bottom fairings for the ground effect.
Sorry I forgot to take a picture of where I placed them but you can use your imagination because It's pretty simple.
I centered mine right under the vent holes with the wire leads towards the signal lights.
I wrapped my leads in electrical tape and zip tied them to the signal light wires. Cut your disconnects into the leads about the same length as the signal light disconnects(don't forget grease and shrink wrap).

Now you need to construct a wiring harness for all your LEDs
Remember you used all male ends for your positive leads? Now you use female ends for all your positive leads on the wiring harness. This way you keep everything connected correctly even when you take your fairings off later on.
I made a fancy wiring diagram for you here! "Just a simplified diagram, not the actual wire runs"

Cut all wires longer than necessary!

POSITIVE WIRES>

For the tail end: Run a wire from the positive lead you made, all the way through to the front left end next to the left side signal light disconnect

For the left and right side fairings: Just use the existing signal light disconnects as a guide and cut the wire the length between them plus a little extra for routing behind the head tube.

For the front fender: Run your positive behind the head tube and to the left side signal disconnect. (Remember to add a male/female disconnect at the head tube)

For the ON/OFF switch: Cut a wire from the output of the on/off switch and run it loosely to the left side signal light disconnect.

Take a FEMALE disconnect and on the left side signal disconnect twist the "tail light, left side of the left-to-right fairing, front fender, and switch lead" wires together and crimp the disconnect onto them.

Then crimp another female end onto the right side of the "left-to-right side fairing" wire

NEGATIVE WIRES>

For the tail end: Crimp a male end in the storage compartment and run the wire from the negative lead to the battery.

For the left and right side fairings: run a wire the same as you did for the positive.

For the right side fairing: run a wire to the negative battery terminal from the right side signal disconnect.

For the front fender: run the negative wire to the right side signal disconnect. (remember to add a female/male disconnect at the head tube)

For the negative battery terminal: twist together the two wires(from the tail end and the right side fairing) and crimp on a blue battery terminal (an appropriate size for the terminal bolt).
Connect the terminal to the battery after removing the test terminal we made earlier.

Now take a MALE disconnect and twist together the front fairing, right side of the left-to-right side fairing, and right side fairing to battery wires and crimp the disconnect on.

WARNING/CAUTION
Make sure you can freely turn the wheel all the way left and right without any binding or tangling.

After all your disconnects are properly crimped and wires have been measured, test it out.
Doesn't work? check all your connections.
Still doesn't work? check continuity with a multimeter.
Really doesn't work? Get help!

When it's working, switch it off and wrap all your wires together with electrical tape to prevent chafing and to give it a cleaner look. Make sure the wheel can still turn freely afterward.

Make sure everything looks good and clean. Nothing is going to be touching anything hot or any moving parts.

Slap it all back together and show it off! Post your work!
 

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Excellent write up, how do you feel about the shade of green it produces? I've noticed that a lot of cameras don't display LED color accurately, but it seems pretty steady in your pictures.

I'm not typically a fan of LEDs, but on some motorcycles it can look pretty good as well as the added benefit of lowering the chance people side swipe you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Excellent write up, how do you feel about the shade of green it produces? I've noticed that a lot of cameras don't display LED color accurately, but it seems pretty steady in your pictures.

I'm not typically a fan of LEDs, but on some motorcycles it can look pretty good as well as the added benefit of lowering the chance people side swipe you.
It looks a little blue in the pictures but overall I'm happy with the color.

I might add some more lights to the swing arm, but not sure how I will do that effectively while hiding the lights and wires just yet.
 

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Thank you for this guide. I will attempt this mod using the same products, but with white LEDs on a white Ninja.
::crosses fingers::
 

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Can you suggest any way to mount the switch without cutting a hole through the fairing?
There doesn't seem to be much/any room on the handlebars to mount a switch. :\
 

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Just curious, I'm looking at putting lights on my new bike and I was just wondering... about how many strips did you need to effectively light up your bike to where it looks good like in the pictures. Would 6 strips of lighting be enough or overkill?
 

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I was about to purchase some SMD's for my bike. I am just having trouble with positioning them as to where they will look the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I was about to purchase some SMD's for my bike. I am just having trouble with positioning them as to where they will look the best.
If you read my whole writeup you'll see where I put my lights under the front fender and rear, I didn't include a picture of the side fairings but I positioned them to reflect out of the vent holes.
 
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