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Had a Kawasaki dealership service my bike (an intermediate service) Cover all fluid changes and check over of the entire bike etc.. Took it for a ride two days later after daily riding to work (30 deg C afternoon) after 30min of riding come to a stationary stop only to have the overheating light come on and boiling sound from the radiator. At this point I was far away from home. I kept up the speed on the way home so it wasn't as hot however as much as I tried to keep engine off or bike moving it always came to boil at lights. Got home and check the bike over to see no coolant in the reservoir. Going to be calling them tomorrow, as Im rather angry about the potential damage that I could've or has been done to my bike. How should I handle this? I dont want to be arrogant as I know sh*t happens, but Im just concerned about my bike as could have potential to cease or have head gasket issues.. :frown2:

I was confident that I would be able to take my bike out after this extensive service and ride it hard confident that everything was as good as new :(
 

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Just goes to show - if you want something done right...do it yourself.

Was there coolant in the radiator? A low level in overflow bottle isn't as critical as a low level in the radiator. Where was it "boiling over" from? Was the radiator cap tight?

There are a few serious issues that could come from overheating.

I would call and get it back to the dealer ASAP - but I wouldn't ride it. I wouldn't add any coolant or do anything to it.
 

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Ouch! Sorry for you, man. Coolant is only replaced every 3 years / 36k miles according to the service manual, and that may be conservative as coolant really lasts long. But the dealer should have checked the level at least.


Never trust that the dealer or any shop did everything well. Always double check your self and consider your bike under test right after any service. Check yourself everything you can check and be alert to any light or noises.


Next time, don't ride the bike at all if the temp light is on. Light is on, you turn off the engine right away.
 

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Sucks man. But stories like these help DIYers like us feel smug about doing the job ourselves.

As far as recourse, you have pretty much none. They are going to care as much about your complaint as they did about changing the radiator fluid in the first place. Unless there's objective, demonstrable damage, they won't lift so much as an eyebrow so don't even bother getting too mad about it.

At this point, in my opinion, the course of action is as follows:
1. Go to the shop, politely inform them of the situation and get them to drain and refill the antifreeze circuit. Get on paper that the issue only arose immediately after the last service. Only raise a stink about the issue if they refuse to leave a note. If they're okay with writing it down, just be polite because they aren't going to treat you any better anyway. Extra points if you get them to explicitly state on paper your bike overheated as a result (which they might not want to do since there is no proof). Anything they admit or promise verbally is as if they never did. If your state is a 'one party consent state' you may just want to make a recording on your phone given that it costs you nothing. Also, get a copy for yourself - just having the info on their computer means nothing.
2. Find out why the level is low. That isn't supposed to happen. It could be as trivial as a loose cap, as normal as the fluid having been changed and simply not purging it right, or as bad as a head gasket leak. The least they can do is try to find out.
3. Go on your merry way and don't worry about it. There's a 99% chance that nothing happened and your bike is fine. Making sure you have objective, demonstrable evidence is just covering your ass in case you lose that bet.

And next time, do the job yourself while catching up on some audiobook or podcast. In most cases there is little to gain from going to the shop for regular maintenance. Stories like this are far more common than rare.
 

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Sucks man. But stories like these help DIYers like us feel smug about doing the job ourselves.

As far as recourse, you have pretty much none. They are going to care as much about your complaint as they did about changing the radiator fluid in the first place. Unless there's objective, demonstrable damage, they won't lift so much as an eyebrow so don't even bother getting too mad about it.

At this point, in my opinion, the course of action is as follows:
1. Go to the shop, politely inform them of the situation and get them to drain and refill the antifreeze circuit. Get on paper that the issue only arose immediately after the last service. Only raise a stink about the issue if they refuse to leave a note. If they're okay with writing it down, just be polite because they aren't going to treat you any better anyway. Extra points if you get them to explicitly state on paper your bike overheated as a result (which they might not want to do since there is no proof). Anything they admit or promise verbally is as if they never did. If your state is a 'one party consent state' you may just want to make a recording on your phone given that it costs you nothing. Also, get a copy for yourself - just having the info on their computer means nothing.
2. Find out why the level is low. That isn't supposed to happen. It could be as trivial as a loose cap, as normal as the fluid having been changed and simply not purging it right, or as bad as a head gasket leak. The least they can do is try to find out.
3. Go on your merry way and don't worry about it. There's a 99% chance that nothing happened and your bike is fine. Making sure you have objective, demonstrable evidence is just covering your ass in case you lose that bet.

And next time, do the job yourself while catching up on some audiobook or podcast. In most cases there is little to gain from going to the shop for regular maintenance. Stories like this are far more common than rare.

:iagree: BUT !! Knowing me, I would want and expect an explanation from either the " SERVICE MANAGER " or the " DEALERSHIP OWNER ", as to why their was no coolant ? Then, I would expect them to service and inspect the complete cooling system at their time and cost.
Simple, Simple. :excl:


Off subject, not all service people are the greatest, being either vehicles or motorcycles.
Example given:
Had Hyundai Tucson in for service and coolant change. Upon picking up vehicle the Service Manager stated that I may have a coolant pump leaking. I said ..... SHOW ME ! They put the vehicle on the lift and showed me some drops off coolant in the area of the pump and pulleys. My next question was .......... did you not just service the coolant and don't you think that some may have been spilled. WELL ! They wiped down the coolant, that was supposed to be leaking and guess what ? NO COOLANT LEAK !


Just goes to prove what I am always telling people ....... " DO NOT TRUST ANYBODY " :excl:
And always check out the work yourself, after getting the vehicle home.
 
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But... do we know it had no coolant? An empty overflow reservoir doesn't mean an empty circuit. It would be pretty realistic for the antifreeze circuit to be mostly full with a big air pocket and the overflow reservoir full, and once the bike's engine circulated the liquid, the liquid went from the overflow reservoir to the circuit purging the bubble and leaving the overflow reservoir empty and circuit full. It's realistic for the antifreeze cap to not be screwed on tight leading to low pressure and the over-temp light turning on. If the technician simply meant to finish purging the air later (which is required after every refill and isn't always straightforward), this is all easily explainable.

If there's no damage, you're not going to be compensated in any meaningful way, period. You can complain to the manager all you like, but you're not gonna get anything out of it besides frustration. There's virtually no chance of receiving any more than a free service next time that you probably don't want anyway. Like in most cases in life, Hanlon's law is probably at play - I really doubt this is anything more than an innocent mistake. It could have happened to anyone, and it's the whole reason why the dash has an over-temp light and there's an extra reservoir.

If you actually want to see "how bad it is", drain the antifreeze from both the lower drain and cylinder head drain. Chances are there's enough fluid to make damage unlikely. Now if the liquid's dirty and virtually non-existent, then you might have something to argue (in which case evidence, evidence, evidence).
 

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... after 30min of riding come to a stationary stop only to have the overheating light come on and boiling sound from the radiator. At this point I was far away from home. I kept up the speed on the way home so it wasn't as hot however as much as I tried to keep engine off or bike moving it always came to boil at lights. Got home and check the bike over to see no coolant in the reservoir.



It's never a good idea to ride without coolant. For future reference, if the overheat light is on (car, truck, motorcycle, etc.) it is a good idea to NOT drive/ride anymore. At least fill up the [apparent] empty reservoir to recommended level.


Since there were [traffic] "lights" it suggests some sort of built-up area, where I am sure a bottle of water was for sale somewhere.


If there is damage to the engine, and if I'd be the person who serviced the bike, I'd be inclined to blame the driving-after-the-coolant-light-was-on for said damage.
 

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If there is damage to the engine, and if I'd be the person who serviced the bike, I'd be inclined to blame the driving-after-the-coolant-light-was-on for said damage.

Agreed. That was my first though when reading the post.

What’s done is done, but I would have the bike towed (free with insurance) to the dealership instead of continuing to ride it home. I wouldn’t want to risk overheating and warping any of the engine’s internals.

Maybe it’s time to start investing in some tool and get comfortable doing basic service items like oil, air filter, and coolant flush.

Hopefully everything turns out okay



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Just goes to show - if you want something done right...do it yourself.
Man, +1 on that.

People are so scared, think everything is so hard, but it's really not.

Add in the fact that the simple jobs in the service dept go to the "simple" people working there, often teenagers with minimal experience, there's a good reason to keep bike away from service departments.
 
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