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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read around a bit but nobody seems to have a solution to this. On my 2014, anytime I drop the throttle past about 15% it instantly goes to idle. This is a major pain in the ass.

I've tried using the clutch to decel, and maneuvering at slow speeds isn't too much of a problem, but god forbid I hit a bump and my hand shifts a quarter of a degree and the engine goes from 0 to 15%. I'm fairly certain this is the DFCO I've read about, but want to see if anyone found a solution.

Short question: Why is the throttle missing the 0-15% range, and how do I disable the herk jerk.

The bike is awesome, but this is a major annoyance.

(As far as the gearing/ECU/chain/engine goes, my bike is bone stock.)
 

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There is no solution. You just have to deal with it.
 

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Tighten up your throttle cable. I like mine to have very little free play, which eliminates much of the jerkiness and allows me to execute more fine throttle control in the 0-15% range. Just make sure the engine rpms don't increase when you turn the handlebars to full lock in either direction (after tightening the cable and securing the lock nut, turn the bars back and forth while the engine is running in neutral with the bike standing stil, and check that the tach needle doesn't jump up).
 

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You're still going to get a lot of jerky even if the throttle cables are tight. Its just the nature of the bike.
 

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I just had this discussion with husband while we were riding through a slow, 25 mph zone earlier today. I hit a bump and jerked the bike something fierce since it was already bogged down (intentionally) in 2nd gear. He thought I missed a shift or something. Funny thing is, I've ridden this bike so much that I don't even think about it anymore - it's just something you get used to after awhile.
 

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You're still going to get a lot of jerky even if the throttle cables are tight. Its just the nature of the bike.
It will still be there to some extent, but for me at least, tightening the throttle cable made a huge difference.

It also helps if you don't put too much weight on your right hand or squeeze the right grip too tightly. That will just exacerbate the problem when you run over a bump or pothole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It will still be there to some extent, but for me at least, tightening the throttle cable made a huge difference.

It also helps if you don't put too much weight on your right hand or squeeze the right grip too tightly. That will just exacerbate the problem when you run over a bump or pothole.
Yes, I typically ride with little to no pressure on my handlebars, but it's incredibly annoying to decelerate and hit that "instant-off" throttle position. With the engine braking on this bike, it makes for very jerky deceleration. And yes, I know I can just pull the clutch and coast to a stop, but I'm trying to avoid that.
 

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Yes, I typically ride with little to no pressure on my handlebars, but it's incredibly annoying to decelerate and hit that "instant-off" throttle position. With the engine braking on this bike, it makes for very jerky deceleration. And yes, I know I can just pull the clutch and coast to a stop, but I'm trying to avoid that.
My bike did it too until I took it in for the 600 mile service. After the service I didn't get that jerkiness. I heard that the ecu was cutting off the gas during deceleration. I'm guessing they must have flashed the ecu to bypass the gas cutoff. You may want to give the service manager a call to confirm.
 

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Riding hard through the twists it really shows up as you try to ease on the throttle in turns it is really noticeable. Adjusting the cables did nothing. I suspect a power commander may help the problem. Hopefully someone with A power commander will chime in with their experience.
 

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I'm more interested on acceleration when you slowly twist on the throttle in a tight turn.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, tight turns are tricky if your throttle is in that 16-18% zone. Unless you have absolutely no movement in your hand it's a little tough. Of course, typically we avoid taking turns with low throttle, but sometimes it can't be helped.

For me though, it's mostly deceleration. Riding towards a stop light in fifth, slowly rolling off the throttle to slow, and then all of a sudden it hits that zero throttle spot and the engine starts heavy braking. I know it's bad practice, but I've started pulling clutch and coasting in once I reach about 20%.

Yea, I know I can keep the bike in the 7000 rpm range all the time, but I don't like doing that in a residential area.
 

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What I'm talking about is 9-10k going through a turn and starting to roll on the throttle. It is smooth for about a quarter turn then there is a big jump almost like from zero to full throttle not linear on the power. I don't think you would notice it unless you are riding hard and getting on the throttle early in the turn. It really upsets the balance of the bike as you are going through the turn because of the weight transfer. The front gets light while you are leaned over and is unsettling as a rider.
 
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