Kawasaki Ninja 300 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
HOW TO: install a Roaring Toyz lowering kit

Hey all - just wanted to share my experience installing a Roaring Toyz lowering kit on my wife's 300. The job was simpler than I anticipated, and will be easily reversible when she is confident in her ability to hop off the seat at stoplights.

I want to start this thread with a request - Let's keep this thread about 'how' to lower a bike not 'why'. I am not posting this to discuss the pros and cons of lowering a bike. I understand it changes the suspension and steering dynamics, and there are plenty of other threads discussing that. Let's use this as a walk-thru for those who are determined to lower their bike and are considering doing it themselves. Thanks! :)

Let's get started!

The kit itself is simple: blocks to raise the bars in front to allow the forks to rise up further through the top triple clamp, longer 'dogbone' links for the rear to raise the swingarm in relation to the rear shock, and a shorter kickstand. Some may choose to shorten (section and reweld) the stock kickstand, or just use the stock one as is. I didn't like how upright the bike was with the stocker after lowering, and still wanted the ability to raise the bike back up at a later date so I didn't want to cut the stock one up.



The trick to this project is supporting the bike. Stands don't work, as the bike has to be supported by the frame, not the suspension. I used my engine hoist (cherry picker) and straps which allowed my to adjust the bike height while working. I know there are other ways out there to support the bike using floor jacks and wood blocks, and I'm sure someone out there has done it with the side stand, some dental floss, and a dozen phone books. :rolleyes:


I started by taking some baseline measurements of the bike's ride height. It doesn't matter so much where you measure from, as long as you are going to be able to repeat that measurement. I was going for lowering the bike 1". For the front I chose the edge of the bodyline near the headlight...



I removed the 4 bolts (6mm hex) holding the bars to the triple. The controls can be left on the bars, I just wrapped them in some towels so they didn't scuff the fairings.



Next I measured how far the factory had the forks out the top of the triple. 0.42" on the left and 0.41" on the right for those interested.



I loosened the lower triple clamps (8mm hex) on the forks with the bike still on the ground. It was easier to do because I could still turn the forks side to side to get at them. Access was best from the top.





It was finally time to support the bike. I used some straps that came with a tie down set and looped around the steering head.



With the bike's weight supported now by the hoist I loosened the top triple clamps (12mm capscrew). The next part would have been easier with another set of hands, but with some patience I lowered the hoist and worked the forks up through the triple until I had 1.42" showing.



The blocks in the kit slip over the exposed forks and the supplied (longer) bolts go in. The factory plastic bolt caps snap into the new bolts, for anyone who was concerned. :rolleyes:



I reassembled everything in reverse order and the front was done in under an hour, much quicker and easier than I anticipated.

Time for the rear.

I supported the rear of the bike strapping to the pillion peg brackets, being cautions near the rear master cylinder. The dogbone links are easy enough to get at, and are attached by two 19mm bolts with locking nuts. As I got further into the rear I took less and less pictures - the factory coated the outside of these bolts with some fantastic white grease that I was getting everywhere and made using the phone/camera difficult. :mad: I would have understood having grease where the bolts contacted the links, but it was ONLY ON THE HEAD OF THE BOLTS WHERE THE SOCKET GOES ON. Head of bolt=greasy. Shank of bolt=dry. :confused:





I had to remove the exhaust heatshield to get the 19mm bolts out. There was a band clamp at the bottom of the shield around the pipe that I loosened and slid down the pipe to get it out of the way and a 5mm hex bolt visible from the outside. There is also a tab at the top of the shield that attached to the silencer, I had to slide the shield forward to free it from the bike.





With the heat shield out of the way and the nuts off of the 19mm bolts I raised the hoist until there was no pressure on the suspension and the bolts slid right out. The new links go in with the single hole on top, and your choice of holes on the bottom. The shortest choice out of the 5 (top left hole in the pic below) is the same as the stock link. I chose the nearest one to stock, which lowered the bike 1" +/- 1/8" according to my tape measure. I have seen other internet posts about the top center hole being the one for 1". Update - I switched to the top center hole which is correct for the 1" drop, bike sits level this way. Pictures will still show the wrong hole being used. - This is my only disappointment with the Roaring Toyz products so far - $200 worth of beautiful billet aluminum parts but not a single scrap of paper with any instructions, descriptions, or warnings. Nothing. A note about which hole drops the bike how far would have been helpful.



So with the lowering links bolted in place and the heat shield back on I set the bike down on the ground and checked out the kickstand situation. With the bike now 1" lower than stock the factory kickstand worked, but the bike was too upright for my comfort. Replacing it was simple.

With the kickstand up (bike on stands) I removed the springs from the kickstand.



I then removed the 5mm hex bolt attaching the lower fairing to give myself some room to work. I did not need to remove the entire fairing, I just needed to be able to pry it down a little bit. With the fairing loose, I removed the screw holding the actuator for the kickstand kill switch. Be careful, there is a lock washer and a nylon washer behind the screw. The kickstand itself is held with a 17mm bolt and nut. The new kickstand uses the same bolt, but in a different way. The factory stand has the bolt on the inside and the nut on the outside of the stand. The new one has the bolt on the outside and the inside of the stand is threaded itself (no nut needed). With the new stand on I put the kill switch actuator back on - being careful to align the index ( 2 flat sides) on the switch with the actuator. I reattached the springs and DONE! :cool:





All together I did this project in under 2 hours by myself and taking time for pictures and wiping white grease off of everything I touched. :rolleyes:

update - took it for a short test ride - I didn't notice any adverse affects in handling or steering. The only difference is that the riding position is very upright now with the bars higher and closer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
A pictures of the finished bike...?

Sent from my LG-P999 using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
I have the same setup. I didnt even support the bike. I just put the spacers on the bars and re-attached them. Then I losened the fork clamps and it just falls into the spacers.

The rear dog bones every hole is suppose to be .5 inches. The middle is 1in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
I've done a few mods already and this is without a doubt the best one ive done. If I had to chose one mod out of them all. It would be my lowering kit.

Despite what others say I have noticed no change in the handling of the bike at all. I am 5"6' and could one foot the bike fine before but now being able to flat foot both has made the bike so much more comfortable and enjoyable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the dogbone info Bigwood. I was having trouble getting a good measurement on the rear and didn't figure I could get any tech support from the mfg on a Friday night. I'll drop it to the next hole.

As for the front... I noticed while measuring that the forks are not bottomed out in the factory bars, so if you went all the way into the bars with the spacers your front is more than 1" lower than stock, approx 3/8".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
Thanks for the dogbone info Bigwood. I was having trouble getting a good measurement on the rear and didn't figure I could get any tech support from the mfg on a Friday night. I'll drop it to the next hole.

As for the front... I noticed while measuring that the forks are not bottomed out in the factory bars, so if you went all the way into the bars with the spacers your front is more than 1" lower than stock, approx 3/8".
The tubes are at an angle. If you just pull them out 1in the front end of the bike prob didnt drop 1in. maybe i dono lol?

I did not measure anyway. I found instructions somewhere. I did what it said. I think I used soupys lowering spacer instructions. I seriously doubt kawasaki is checking in the factory anyway. They prob just jam them up there and tighten.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
any noticeable loss of agility in your bike?
I noticed nothing. The only thing you will feel is the handle bars are a bit higher and further back. I like it cause its a little more comfortable for me like that. Also for whatever reason the bike will sag more in the rear. I think maybe its because the leverage on the shock changes or maybe I ate to many sandwiches. I had to turn the preload up one click to make it perfect for me again.

The kick stand is kind of annoying cause it has no real spot sticking out for your foot to catch. It also does not have as big of a contact patch with the asphalt. So be careful when parking on hot days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The kick stand on these bikes is in an awkward place from the factory...the left peg is in the way of making a smooth sweep down with my foot. You're right - the RT stand is even smaller and accentuates this difficulty. And yeah - the point of contact on the ground is really small. I might keep a look out for a stock stand to buy and section.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I noticed nothing. The only thing you will feel is the handle bars are a bit higher and further back. I like it cause its a little more comfortable for me like that. Also for whatever reason the bike will sag more in the rear. I think maybe its because the leverage on the shock changes or maybe I ate to many sandwiches. I had to turn the preload up one click to make it perfect for me again.
Good to know, thanks man. I've consistently been debating if i should install my links or not..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
993 Posts
is 1" the max it can lower? I was hoping for 1.5
You can lower the back 2" with the multiple dogbones, the front i'm not sure if they make thicker plates than 1", you would have to do a search to find that out.
I have the Black*Path set and have it at 1.5" so the wife can ride if she likes, she is 5'1"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
As for lowering the front more I don't think the clutch cable would allow for any more distance away from the top triple than the 1" spacer.

Keep in mind that lowering the bike 1" front and back was enough to allow my wife to touch with both feet, and she is only 5' tall...

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Thank you so much for this information. It is exactly what I was looking for.

My wife and I are considering the Ninja 300 as a starter bike for her, but she has short legs and does not feel comfortable not being able to reach even her tip-toes to the ground with both feet at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I just received the same lowering kit from roaring toys but the kickstand actually gave me a lot of trouble.. I had to use a 1/2 bit to bore it out till the bolt slid in perfect. Did anyone else have this problem or did they just send me the wrong part?


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Thank you so much for this information. It is exactly what I was looking for.

My wife and I are considering the Ninja 300 as a starter bike for her, but she has short legs and does not feel comfortable not being able to reach even her tip-toes to the ground with both feet at the same time.
Hey my wife's only 5"0 with short legs. The 300 is perfect for her after I put the lowering kit on. Only issue is with the lowering kit at the lowest setting the ferrings run hella close to ground an it doesn't take much to bottom out. I have her riding around on it with the ferrings stripped till she's more comfortable riding on the next setting up! Hope this helps


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi. I bought the same dog bone but have not idea what each hole equal. Which one is for the smallest lowering and which one for the biggest lowering. I'm trying to lower by 1 inch as I am only 5'1''. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
I found this link. I think the OP didn't have this information about the height adjustment. It's always good to compare the OEM to the new dog bone link and always take measurements. Verify that the new dog bone matches to the stock bolt placement and go from there.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,652 Posts
Sport Rider/Motorcyclist (I forget which one) recommend no more than a 1.5" drop. Of course, I recommend you not lower the bike unless you really need to, but if you really need to, more power to ya.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tehdopeshow
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top