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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just leaned so far over on a right turn that I scraped my boot on the asphalt... From the top of.the foot peg. Either that or it's time I seriously booked that track day and learned some serious knee dragging skill...

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lol if all it takes to install them is simple wrenching I'm in

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is that sprocket changed yet Rick?
That's a negative sir I've been so busy at work I've really only been going to work the last few days...

/dons cup to prepare for my ball-busting

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Do you have the balls of your feet on the pegs? Or your arches?
Balls definitely I wear my.boots that conveniently "lock" onto the pegs so my feet aren't sliding around on them. I think.the guys got it right, I just need to adjust them at some point. No hurry no worry just thought it was a fun experience which is why I posted it

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Feet position on the pegs may also be incorrect, I know there are a few sites and videos that will show/teach you correct foot position when riding. I often used to scrape my boot when cornering, until I found out I was riding my bike with an incorrect foot position.
 

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You can prevent your pegs from scraping by shifting your body over to the inside of the corner like you see in MotoGP. When you shift a butt cheek off the seat and shift your body over with your knee out, it leans your body over like your hanging off the bike. But at the same time, it actually stands your bike up, so your foot pegs don't scrape as easily.

Keep in mind, this is an aggressive riding technique and may be best to master on a track. It allows you to pull off a greater combined lean angle between you and your bike, which means you can pull more Gs in a turn. This of course increases your chances of losing traction when done aggressively.

However, if it's a useful technique to have if you start scraping a peg and realize you need to turn harder with a greater lean angle to make the corner. But ideally you setup for the body lean with your cheek off the seat before the turn.
 

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You can prevent your pegs from scraping by shifting your body over to the inside of the corner like you see in MotoGP. When you shift a butt cheek off the seat and shift your body over with your knee out ...
Don't drag your knee out on public roads. Unlike a track, you can't guarantee what crap like small bits of broken glass, or a really rough patch of worn road. Either of which could either tear up your gear and knee or drag and catch your knee and rip your leg back and out causing an spill or some serious injury (I've seen both happen before.) The primary reason the knee is out and down in MotoGP is to act primarily as a feeler. They cut as much weight as possible so usually most motoGP rear sets don't have feelers on em anymore and as a rider you can't look down in every turn to ensure you aren't giving it too much lean angle. So they put their knee down a bit to use their knee slider as a feeler to know when they are at their max angle. You don't need this with the stock pegs. Keep the balls of your feet on the pegs and pinch the bike with your knees, heel, and toes which will keep the toe of your boot from dragging before the feeler on the peg touches.

So like Woomba said, the product of the lean angle of a turn is the combined lean angle of both rider and bike. All it takes is a little bit of adjustment to the inside of the turn with body position to give yourself extra clearance. If you have to in the future make a sharp turn and need to decrease bike lean angle you should:

1)lower your body to tank. This lowers your combined CG(center of gravity) making any attempts at shifting CG to either side quicker and more controlled.

2)Slide your ass a little towards the inside of the turn. Get a cheek off AT MOST. You still need to be able to touch the outside peg/controls effectively. This is the first half of moving your CG into the turn.

3)While your sliding a bit of ass off your bike, now shift your body a bit forward and inside of the turn (kiss the mirror.) Keep your head and eyes on the turn exit while remaining stable on the throttle and light touch on the brakes if needed. (This is the second half of the shifting of your CG to the inside of the turn.) You should have done all the breaking you needed prior to entering the turn, but sometimes you may underestimate the turn and very slight touch(not pull,slam,grab,jerk) of the brakes will help but it will also change the product of your lean angle requirements and is considered an advanced technique.

With pretty much all street riding at legal speeds you really don't have to be too drastic with the body positioning. If you watch this guy doing his skills test http://youtu.be/XCGaQMgkzw8 you'll notice he gets all the clearance he needs with very minimal shifting of the body and probably can turn harder and tighter than myself and a whole lot of other people here.

Sorry for the long post and all, but I personally believe it's very irresponsible to tell a new rider to go out and drag a knee and not explain precisely what the how and the why are of doing it. So when you ride keep hands, feet, and all other body parts inside the ride at all times. :D

A great resource I think all new riders should go through are all the safety tips and videos on this site http://www.msgroup.org/ There are A LOT on there especially the tips portion.

Good luck.
 

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Sorry for the long post and all, but I personally believe it's very irresponsible to tell a new rider to go out and drag a knee and not explain precisely what the how and the why are of doing it.
While I agree with the advice you provided..I'd like to point out I wasn't encouraging new riders to drag a knee. At no point did I actually suggest dragging a knee. I only mentioned MotoGP as an example of body position, and how it is used to increase lean angle without the pegs scraping...I even highlighted the increased danger and suggested track use over public roads. I only mentioned a scenario on public roads where it could be used in an emergency to potentially save a rider from running wide.

Was I not clear enough?...:eek:
 

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You can prevent your pegs from scraping by shifting your body over to the inside of the corner like you see in MotoGP. When you shift a butt cheek off the seat and shift your body over with your knee out, it leans your body over like your hanging off the bike. But at the same time, it actually stands your bike up, so your foot pegs don't scrape as easily.
This first part sounds like an overall suggestion. You do perfectly fine explaining the overall basic process, but it's not admonishing the dangerous portion of having an errant limb away from the body when a noob shouldn't be even thinking of this part. If you do not condone something to be done by a noob, don't mention it. You were perfectly fine up to the knee down portion.

Keep in mind, this is an aggressive riding technique and may be best to master on a track.
That's the word that made it sound like a condoned suggestion and not that you were totally advising against. The huge differences a single word can make in perception can be HUGE. Even words with the same basic meaning will have different interpretation. Using "should" is a stronger lean to keep the aggressive riding techniques to the track more than "may." May is a neutral to lax term while should is a little more towards the stricter/restrictive. I would have used will instead of may as that's much more definitive and less neutral. In my old job in the military, the difference in may, should, will, will not had HUGE connotations to the outcome and ramifications based on interpretation of intent.

I'm sorry if it seems I'm being a little harsh. I also know it seems very petty and stupid, but after having one friend rip his leg out of socket and another lose a knee cap, I'm a bit sensitive about having untrained people doing this. Especially on the street.
 

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You were perfectly fine up to the knee down portion.
I never said knee down, I said knee out. So not knee scraping the ground, but hovering above it with room to spare. I've seen body position like this plenty of times to complete turns at a moderately aggressive lean angle without actually dragging a knee.



Using "should" is a stronger lean to keep the aggressive riding techniques to the track more than "may."
Yea, little words count. I just don't like to tell people what to do in concrete terms all the time when I have no real authority over their actions.

Anywho, I feel like there was some "lost in translation" here. No real harm done in the end.
 

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To settle the argument, if you want real advice on how to turn, go out and pay for classes. You're not gunna get the same instruction or interpret it the way you should if you get it off a forum. Woomba didn't imply knee dragging, but that's how you received it, showing that it was interpreted in a way he did not mean for it. I didn't see it that way and I take turns with my cheek off the seat and knee out all the time, NO WHERE NEAR the road as I just wear jeans. it helps me and I feel more comfortable / confident than when I sit directly up on the bike.
 
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