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Ok, so as the title says, I need something to get out light tank scratches. I don’t want to buy a whole new tank because they’re only small scratches, but the owner before me had a zip up jacket and has put some scratches here and there. Any ideas on something I can use? When I washed the bike with turtlewax soap and polish it didn’t seem to do much, which isn’t what I was hoping for ? TIA (attached pic is the worst one I could find
 

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Ok, so as the title says, I need something to get out light tank scratches. I don’t want to buy a whole new tank because they’re only small scratches, but the owner before me had a zip up jacket and has put some scratches here and there. Any ideas on something I can use? When I washed the bike with turtlewax soap and polish it didn’t seem to do much, which isn’t what I was hoping for ? TIA (attached pic is the worst one I could find
Hard to say by just viewing the picture, but they do not look like just light scratches. If they were light scratches / swirl scratches, then I would say to use a light rubbing compound to possibly remove them. But from what I can see, they are pretty deep and may need sanding / filling and a repaint.

Sorry to offer this opinion, but that is what I am seeing. :frown2:

A good auto body person may be able to give you a more favorable opinion. :wink2:
 
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Agreed. If you can feel the scratches with a fingernail you're probably not going to get rid of them without repainting. Those look pretty deep to me.
You can try using a polishing compound. Go slowly and check your work often as you don't want to do more harm than good.
 

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Good advice in the previous 2 posts. I’d suggest you start reading some auto detailing forums if you want to really learn about proper paint polishing / correction.

If you feel them with your nail they are probably too deep to polish out. You can make it look about 90% better by polishing with a dual action polisher and the right compounds / polishes and pads. It own’t get rid of all the scratches but will make a huge difference.
 

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Those look too deep to polish out to me. One looks like it's a dent.

Best you could do without a full repaint would be careful touch-up to fill the scratch/gouge only - nothing past.

After it dries a few days you could do some careful sanding with 1000 to 2000 grit paper to level it out more and then polish.

I don't think it would make it invisible, but a lot less noticeable.
 

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If you're new to paint correction id suggest sticking to hand polishing. It will take a lot longer but it's also a lot more forgiving. You can make a mess with a da pretty quickly.
 

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no offense, but honestly I think hand polishing sucks...very slow and the results are only OK. Now if you're talking old school, rotary / straight line polishers with wool pads then yes, you can burn your paint in a heartbeat! I'd never recommend that.

With a modern DA (dual action) polisher ( Griot's, Harbor Freight, Porter Cable, many others), a polishing pad and a standard (non super aggressive) compound it is pretty hard to hurt your paint. I've seen videos where people bear down with all their weight, enough to stop the polisher, and it doesn't hurt the paint at all.

I think fear keeps a lot of people from using a DA. I've been using one for about 10 years and it has totally transformed my detailing. I will never hand polish a vehicle again after seeing the results that DA polishing delivers.

My tank had some surface scratching / marks from my jacket and I polished them right out...tank looks like new.

I'll include a pic of my Mom's car that I detailed a few weeks ago. This car has sat outside in the Midwest weather for 6 years, never been hand washed / clayed / polished, waxed, anything. The paint was in horrible condition with scratches big and small on every body panel.

Granted, I did a full blown detail (and it's far from perfect) - hand wash with alkaline soap, clayed it, iron decontaminated it, polished, alcohol wipe down then full ceramic coat. I would never have achieved these results by hand..never. Think of the speed your hand moves vs a DA polisher.

So getting back to the original post... you can try hand polishing, and it will help, but if you want to take it to the next level give a DA a shot. This advice applies to everyone who likes a glossy, shiny paint job!
 

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Using a DA, like any power tool, will absolutely make the work go faster. It doesn't inherently give a better result though. All the da does is move the abrasive faster. The same thing can be done by hand.
I think it's a good idea for someone who has never worked on paint (as it sounds like with this guy) to get familiar with how things work the slow way first. At least that way, if you're doing something stupid, the mistake can be noticed and corrected before it gets out of hand.
To each his own though.
 

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or you can always practice with a DA on someone else's vehicle, first! :smile2:
 

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Whether you decide to attempt this by hand, or using a DA, I suggest starting with a kit from Color Rite. They're the only company I've found that will guarantee an OEM paint match and they make it easy enough that it's nearly impossible to screw up the paint match.

https://www.colorrite.com/department/kawasaki-10020.cfm

Now, my advice, if the scratches are only in the clear coat, by all means, try to fix it yourself. If they're down to the paint, or the actual paint in chipped, I suggest taking it to a shop to have it professionally done.
 

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good suggestion from Rogue, too.

After my long winded speech on using a DA (cough, cough)....you can just start the old fashioned way...buy a bottle of compound (Meguiars Ultimate Compound is one that comes to mind)...get a clean microfiber....rub some in...use a different microfiber to buff it off. If it works you're good to go! (but please apply either wax or sealant afterwards).

Let us know how this turns out.
 
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