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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So the ordeal is finally over!

I just finished the whole process of buying a new 2017 Kawasaki Ninja 650 ABS, selling and transferring my old 2015 Kawasaki Ninja 300 ABS to a friend, and selling their 2016 Kawasaki Ninja 650 ABS to a buyer...in a foreign country (yup, that was unexpected for me too).

Since selling a vehicle is something done so seldom, it's hard to remember all the little "best practices" between sales. Plus, sometimes it's just nice to walk through the whole process in advance to take the intimidation factor out of the equation. Specially if you're debating whether to trade it in or sell it yourself. I ended up writing a thorough guide on my take on the topic. It goes over every step from start to finish, including some things that hardly ever get mentioned anywhere. If anyone lives in Florida it's specially useful since it includes some specific information, though it should be of help regardless of location.

Anyway, here it is:

Instructables.com - How to Sell a Used Motorcycle - Tips & Tricks

I posted it there since the interface is a lot better for DIYs, and if I ever have to edit anything I can.

If anyone has any tips or suggestions of their own, I'd be glad to hear them. And while you probably won't need this right now (unless the new Ninja 400 ends up tempting you), you might wanna bookmark it for future reference if you think it'll be useful in the future. I put a lot of time into writing it, so knowing that it's helpful to someone is what makes it worth it.
 

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Awesome! :emot-worship: Your DIY's are superb! Seriously, thanks for taking the time to do these!
 

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I have a different methodology, mainly because bikes being sold for max profit sit on craigslist for way too long and the seller has to deal with tirekickers and a lot of BS. I price my bikes low enough that they sell in a day or two, and my first contact between a buyer isn't "Will you take $XXXX?" My bikes are always in great condition and well maintained, so no problem there.

I sold my 675R for $2K under market value and had it sold in a half day. In fact I had 8 contacts in the span of 4 hours, and anyone who had the nerve to ask me questions or for more pictures went to the back on the line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Awesome! :emot-worship: Your DIY's are superb! Seriously, thanks for taking the time to do these!
Thanks! Though half the time I start them thinking "This'll take a coffee and a half to finish" and I end up regretting having started two days later, hehe.

I have a different methodology, mainly because bikes being sold for max profit sit on craigslist for way too long and the seller has to deal with tirekickers and a lot of BS. I price my bikes low enough that they sell in a day or two, and my first contact between a buyer isn't "Will you take $XXXX?" My bikes are always in great condition and well maintained, so no problem there.

I sold my 675R for $2K under market value and had it sold in a half day. In fact I had 8 contacts in the span of 4 hours, and anyone who had the nerve to ask me questions or for more pictures went to the back on the line.
That's definitely one way to go about it. At the end of the day what matters is price so if it's low enough, it'll obviously sell. It depends on the bike, of course. If you've put a lot of time and money into the bike, it's a bit of a waste. A person's going to treat and value it a lot better if he doesn't consider it "a steal".

The "too long and a lot of BS", that's a bit relative. I posted it on 3 sites, and the best contacts came from Ebay Motors. It took a month and a half (that's a really reasonable timeframe in my book. Specially in winter). My messages we're copy-pasted from a template, including links to a folder with 40 pics and a 4 or 5 page vehicle log. It probably takes me less to respond then it takes them to message me. Heck, I probably took way longer to write the guide then I ever spent dealing with prospective buyers. I guess it's also a factor that I do online vacation rentals so this is just regular stuff for me. And pricewise, the bike sold for 5299$ when I expected it to sell for 4299$ or less (1.5 years, 3600 miles, "old" model, scratches on both sides). All in all the extra time I put in is definitely compensated by what I got out. It really depends on one's particular situation. Both methodologies are worth considering.
 

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Yeah, for me, a month and a half is way too long. IMHO if it takes that long to sell something, the price is too high.

Still that's small potatoes compared to some other stuff I have seen. Guys asking way too much for a bike and it's been on the market for 5 years. Craigslist is full of people with lots of time on their hands, willing to wait forever just to make a few hundred more bucks. The other annoyance is people trying so hard to lowball you.

I think my time is just too valuable to fart around with tirekickers, lowballers, bullshitters and people who want your bike but have no money.
 

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I used to sell low to get rid of my rides fast, but then I realized I value the money. I take damn good care of my vehicles and I'm not just going to give it away, especially when I'm willing to pay more for a well cared for machine.

I don't mind letting it sit for longer. The bike is the one sitting around waiting, not me. I carry on with my life while it's for sale. All I have to do is occasionally meet up with someone for 10 minutes and answer their questions, or answer a few emails or texts. $1,000+ is worth the bother, considering how many hours/days I have to work to earn that much dough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, for me, a month and a half is way too long. IMHO if it takes that long to sell something, the price is too high.

Still that's small potatoes compared to some other stuff I have seen. Guys asking way too much for a bike and it's been on the market for 5 years. Craigslist is full of people with lots of time on their hands, willing to wait forever just to make a few hundred more bucks. The other annoyance is people trying so hard to lowball you.

I think my time is just too valuable to fart around with tirekickers, lowballers, bullshitters and people who want your bike but have no money.
That month and a half is just letting it chill with a cover on in a corner of the garage. I can't really say that bothers me too much after having owned and kept it like that for years. From the moment it was listed I don't think I spent more than 3 hours total. You should probably try listing elsewhere next time. In the guide I touch on how the site (Craigslist) is a factor in market demographics (cheap-asses and Nigerian fraudsters). Also, pricing it higher on it's own would help weed out people just looking for a cheap deal. I didn't encounter too much of that.

If I wanted it sold in two days without effort, I would have sold it for around 3k$. Having sold it for 2300$ more than that, and say I put in 16 hours total (If it's even fair to include things like maintenance and washing the bike), that's still almost 150$/hour. If someone prices their time higher than that, they really should just be trading the bike in instead of selling it anyway. I'm simply presupposing there's a lot of people like me more concerned with a bigger payday.
 

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To each his own, no worries if we all have different selling methods. For me it's about minimizing annoyances, probably more so than minimizing my time. Working out the value of your hours makes it sound like a lot of money, but it's not to me.

In the last 10 years I have sold about 15 bikes. Most on craigslist, though some "special" bikes have sold on various forums.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, at least the effort was recognized. The guide ended up being a runner-up in the contest it was in, which is way more than I expected for such a tedious topic. Anyway, the free t-shirt will do great for getting dirty in the shop.:laugh:
 
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