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Hi all, is the Ninja 300 a good bike for beginners as a first bike? Thank you
Personally, I would rate the Ninja 300 as a very good bike for beginners.

Thru the years I have owned many Touring and Cruiser bikes. But until last year I never owned a Sport Bike, which was a big mistake on my part. Wish that I had purchased one many, many years ago.

The Ninja 300 is light. Handles extremely well and I feel has good power for all levels of riders.

One thing to keep in mind, no matter what bike you choose and that is RESPECT the motorcycle and ride within your limits. You can't go wrong. :wink2:
 

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The Ninja 300 is appropriate for a beginner rider. It is a "sport bike" with many of the advantages and shortcomings of sport bikes.
It handles well and looks like a sport bike. It also has a somewhat aggressive riding position which some may find uncomfortable.

Overall it is a fun, easy to ride and unintimidating bike that has enough power to be fun without having enough to kill you if you sneeze too hard.
 

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The Ninja 300 is appropriate for a beginner rider. It is a "sport bike" with many of the advantages and shortcomings of sport bikes.
It handles well and looks like a sport bike. It also has a somewhat aggressive riding position which some may find uncomfortable.

Overall it is a fun, easy to ride and unintimidating bike that has enough power to be fun without having enough to kill you if you sneeze too hard.
:iagree: But you forgot to mention the " Handle Bar Risers and the Lowering Links ", which will change the riding position and make it somewhat more comfortable.

Surprised that you forgot to mention them as " we " both have the mods. >:)
 

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Didn't want to muddy the water by talking mods. If it's a first bike they will likely be focused on not getting squished and not so much on ergonomics mods:)

Speaking of which how do you like the lowered rear?
 

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Didn't want to muddy the water by talking mods. If it's a first bike they will likely be focused on not getting squished and not so much on ergonomics mods:)

Speaking of which how do you like the lowered rear?
Lowered Rear :question: The Ninja's or mine. :question: :signlol:

With the handles bar risers and lowering links, I can definitely notice / feel a somewhat more
upright / comfortable riding position. While still maintaining the appearance of a Sport Bike. I think the only people that would notice the changes would be a Maintenance Tech and the owner. :wink2:

P.S. Thanks for asking. It was partly thru your postings that helped me decide to make the changes. :eek:ccasion14:
 

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Hi all, is the Ninja 300 a good bike for beginners as a first bike? Thank you
Absolutely! My first bike, 2017. Light, cheap, maneuverable, peppy, great range with 4.5 gal tank, reliable. Twin is smoother than a single cylinder, tends to get a bit buzzy at higher revs, but no biggie.

Love it! :D
 

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It's my first motorcycle. I picked it up nine months ago and have put 9.3K miles on it so far.



Here are some of my pros and cons:


Pros:
1. Fun

2. Sporty

3. Sexy

4. Lightweight and easy to handle

5. Perfect bike for twisties

6. Great commuter for around town and most highway use, very reliable

7. Economical, I average about 52 mpg

8. Easy maintenance, only complicated by removal of fairings for certain jobs



Cons:
1. More low-mid range torque would be nice. I like the sensation and utility of quick acceleration but with the 300 I have to rev the engine up to high rpm (8,000-10,500) to really get the powerband/peak torque. Don't get me wrong it's super fun, but I sometimes just don't feel like racing the bike around everywhere just to make use of it's power.

2. More passing power at highway speeds. I live in Texas where everyone likes to go really fast for some reason, and the Ninja 300 can sometimes be a bit sluggish in passing; especially with wind resistance at higher speeds. Sometimes I choose not to pass because it would be sketchy whereas it likely wouldn't be an issue on a bike with a bit more power on tap.

3. Can be a bit buzzy on long rides, though there are tricks to dampen vibrations. Would recommend taking breaks often.

4. Spongy front brake (mine's ABS). Probably air in my lines, but seems to be common on this bike for some reason. Front brake works well, just has spongy feel on lever. My bicycle's hydraulic disk brakes are nice and crisp...



I love my Ninja and still find it more than adequate for my use at the moment. Idk if I ever want to sell it. It's the stardust white color and I love looking at it, riding it, and maintaining it. :grin2:


I rate Ninja 300 as :10: motorcycle for any experience level.
 

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It's my first motorcycle. I picked it up nine months ago and have put 9.3K miles on it so far.



Here are some of my pros and cons:


Pros:
1. Fun

2. Sporty

3. Sexy

4. Lightweight and easy to handle

5. Perfect bike for twisties

6. Great commuter for around town and most highway use, very reliable

7. Economical, I average about 52 mpg

8. Easy maintenance, only complicated by removal of fairings for certain jobs



Cons:
1. More low-mid range torque would be nice. I like the sensation and utility of quick acceleration but with the 300 I have to rev the engine up to high rpm (8,000-10,500) to really get the powerband/peak torque. Don't get me wrong it's super fun, but I sometimes just don't feel like racing the bike around everywhere just to make use of it's power.

2. More passing power at highway speeds. I live in Texas where everyone likes to go really fast for some reason, and the Ninja 300 can sometimes be a bit sluggish in passing; especially with wind resistance at higher speeds. Sometimes I choose not to pass because it would be sketchy whereas it likely wouldn't be an issue on a bike with a bit more power on tap.

3. Can be a bit buzzy on long rides, though there are tricks to dampen vibrations. Would recommend taking breaks often.

4. Spongy front brake (mine's ABS). Probably air in my lines, but seems to be common on this bike for some reason. Front brake works well, just has spongy feel on lever. My bicycle's hydraulic disk brakes are nice and crisp...



I love my Ninja and still find it more than adequate for my use at the moment. Idk if I ever want to sell it. It's the stardust white color and I love looking at it, riding it, and maintaining it. :grin2:


I rate Ninja 300 as :10: motorcycle for any experience level.
SPONGY FRONT BRAKE , Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm .......... forget how many times I have heard this one. Just bleed the darn system and you will eliminate the sponge ! My front brake is perfect. I am quite sure that if I ever fully applied it, that I would find myself flying over the handle bars. It is a REALLY GOOD FRONT BRAKE. The rear brake is another question. LOL

Buzzy feel ???? Go online to RADGUARD and pick up a pair of their easy to slip on ISO GRIPS. Then good bye to much of BUZZ. Also, GEL seat eliminates good deal of buzz. Hardly notice any buzz while riding my 300.

Have never had a problem with power band, or for that matter passing anybody. And I am talking about New York drivers that do not like to be passed, as they speed up when they think somebody is going to pass them. They are just not very courteous or polite. :frown2:

My " POLISH " brain thinks the Ninja 300 is a do all bike for everybody. :wink2:
 

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I agree, it has taught me well as a first bike. I would say I am decently mechanically inclined, decently skilled at generally "driving" vehicles, and know how to drive a manual, so learning to ride I didn't have to think about or learn about what a clutch does, when it has to be pulled in or not, what actually happens when you change gears, ect. So I was learning muscle memory skills, and finesse and control almost exclusively, and the 300 was a great bike to learn fine clutch control, tight maneuvering, as well as learning all 4 ways to shift (accelerating and decelerating, up and down) and getting used to using all the bikes power when I want it.

I have gone into the real aggressive type of riding, and track riding, and the 300 was an excellent gateway into that scene. It's also great for just learning to become a good rider and gaining excellent road strategy skills as well.

It gets great mileage, generally doesn't eat any oil, maintenance jobs are easy enough to learn to do them like I did, and overall takes a hell of a beating if you take care of it. I would *highly* recommend you learn to do the basic maintenance jobs on the 300 or something similar, they are very friendly to learn, and you'll save a ton of money. The service manuals are available free online, and you don't need a ton of tools to change the oil, change the coolant, change the brake fluid or pads, change the chain/sprockets, adjust the head bearing tension, chain tension/alignment, spark plugs, and even a valve clearance job can be done at home easily.

Even on top of that, insurance is cheap. Im a 20 year old kid with less than a year of riding experience, and the premium is very respectable, ask your insurance provider what the costs look like.

The 300 was just enough power for me to start getting into trouble if I let things get out of hand in the twisties, but not too much to make me crash. I am 100% certain that if I had anything faster, I would have crashed already a few times. But, I ride as hard as I can, and am out there to better myself and learn to be a faster rider, and the 300 is a perfect bike to learn cornering skills and improve quickly. Last month I went to the track and I was able to get my knee down plenty, learn from the coaches how to improve, and I feel like the 300 was a excellent tool to get me to where I am now, in such a short time. Now I ride with the 600s and 1000s in my area when we go to the twisties, and I am plenty fast to keep up those corners!

Just find a new one or one in great shape, these machines are often beat to hell, so buy carefully. The new ninja 400 is only 5k brand new, and although maybe a little more power and lighter, it's also good, just be careful with it. It'll get up to 120 pretty easily, where the 300 only gets to 105-115 depending on your weight and gearing.

Hope this helps.
-Mike
 

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The 300 is definitely a great bike for a beginner. It is also a great bike, full stop.
My Ninja is not my first bike, and I have about 10 years of riding experience (not a huge amount, but I think it's safe to say I'm no beginner) and I still love my 300. I will not be getting rid of it any time soon. I can wind the crap out of it while still remaining within the confines of the law, and she will take all the abuse I give her and keep on ticking. The power of a 600 would either land me in the hospital, morgue, or jail, or I'd never use half of the available power (which you pay for) so the value on a bigger bike just isn't there for me. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have a 200hp speed demon, I just wouldn't get as much out of it as I'm getting with my much much more cost-effective 300. Maybe some day I'll add a fancy fast bike to my stable, but I won't be trading my 300 or my Honda NC700 in for it.
 

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The 300 is definitely a great bike for a beginner. It is also a great bike, full stop.
My Ninja is not my first bike, and I have about 10 years of riding experience (not a huge amount, but I think it's safe to say I'm no beginner) and I still love my 300. I will not be getting rid of it any time soon. I can wind the crap out of it while still remaining within the confines of the law, and she will take all the abuse I give her and keep on ticking. The power of a 600 would either land me in the hospital, morgue, or jail, or I'd never use half of the available power (which you pay for) so the value on a bigger bike just isn't there for me. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have a 200hp speed demon, I just wouldn't get as much out of it as I'm getting with my much much more cost-effective 300. Maybe some day I'll add a fancy fast bike to my stable, but I won't be trading my 300 or my Honda NC700 in for it.
I " might " someday sell my Yamaha V-Star 950. But as far as my 300 is concerned. The worst I may do with it is to hand it down to my Son or Grandson, thus KEEPING it in the family. :wink2:

Grand Daughter does not like motorcycles. :frown2: Besides she lives in Quebec and try giving something away in a foreign country. :RantExplode:
 

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I " might " someday sell my Yamaha V-Star 950. But as far as my 300 is concerned. The worst I may do with it is to hand it down to my Son or Grandson, thus KEEPING it in the family. :wink2:

Grand Daughter does not like motorcycles. :frown2: Besides she lives in Quebec and try giving something away in a foreign country. :RantExplode:
Oh, I'm sure my son (almost 1 year old now) will eventually inherit the 300. On the condition I can still ride it when I want, of course!

You could always take a trip up to QC and "forget" the bike there... :grin2:
 

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Oh, I'm sure my son (almost 1 year old now) will eventually inherit the 300. On the condition I can still ride it when I want, of course!

You could always take a trip up to QC and "forget" the bike there... :grin2:
I have thought / considered many times about just " forgetting " things in Canada. But then how does the problem of ownership / registration / insurance get resolved. :question:

:eek:fftopic: I also have some firearms that I would like to give to my son, who also lives in Quebec. One firearm was custom made to the point where people can not appraise a value. Have taken it many times to firearm experts and none of them could come up with a dollar value.

But then we once again have a problem, which is taking the firearms into Canada as a gift for my son. I am sure the Canadian government would love to confiscate them and keep them for themselves. :frown2:

I have thought about giving them to him while he is visiting here in the USA. But will have to inquire as to whether or not he will have a problem, when entering back into Canada.

NOTE : The firearms are in NO WAY ...... ASSAULT type firearms. But heavily engraved with custom stocks.
 

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:eek:fftopic: I also have some firearms that I would like to give to my son, who also lives in Quebec.
Firearms can be a very complicated area in Canadian law. I will not pretend to be an expert at all, but based on my very basic understanding, as long as it is not classed as a "restricted" firearm, or prohibited, all he'd need to legally be able to own it is his PAL (Posession and Acquisition Licence, formerly called the FAC, Firarms Acquisition Certificate). If it's restricted (which would include all handguns and many short barreled or short overall shotguns and rifles, among others) he would need the restricted license. Prohibited firearms include modified to be short (think sawed-offs, or cutting the stock off), full autos, or really really short handguns. No licencing will allow you to own prohibited weapons. From what I can tell (again, no expert) engraving, etc. should not be a problem as long as the firearm meets the requirements. See http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/index-eng.htm for more details.

This does not factor in import laws, which I'm sure are extra complicated, hard to read clearly, and will depend on if the CBSA has had his Timmie's yet that morning. Again, quick Googling seems to indicate as long as the weapon is not classed as restricted, and the owner has the appropriate licensing for that class (restricted or non-), there should be no problem. Ref : http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/im-ex-eng.htm

Then there's always the proper storage and transport laws. http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/storage-entreposage-eng.htm

Again, not an expert, and I'm sure a grumpy CBSA would just love to find a problem with a customized weapon (I gather it's mostly cosmetic customization? Decoration, not function?). Most CBSAs are great people, but just like anything else, you'll find a few grumpy and/or power-trippy people here and there.

We had a pretty amusing experience once coming back home with parts for a kit plane, picked up from a shipping warehouse in Maine and crossed back into Canada through New Brunswick. The poor border agent had never had someone try and cross back into Canada with a van loaded full of plane parts for personal use. Of course, the crates were basically filled with sheet metal and extrusions as it was a very "build it yourself" type of kit, but his face when we tried to explain we drove down to Maine for the weekend to bring back airplane parts for the plane we were building in our basement was priceless. No hassle, though, just a little extra delay as he had to call his supervisor to see how to handle it.
 

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Firearms can be a very complicated area in Canadian law. I will not pretend to be an expert at all, but based on my very basic understanding, as long as it is not classed as a "restricted" firearm, or prohibited, all he'd need to legally be able to own it is his PAL (Posession and Acquisition Licence, formerly called the FAC, Firarms Acquisition Certificate). If it's restricted (which would include all handguns and many short barreled or short overall shotguns and rifles, among others) he would need the restricted license. Prohibited firearms include modified to be short (think sawed-offs, or cutting the stock off), full autos, or really really short handguns. No licencing will allow you to own prohibited weapons. From what I can tell (again, no expert) engraving, etc. should not be a problem as long as the firearm meets the requirements. See http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/index-eng.htm for more details.

This does not factor in import laws, which I'm sure are extra complicated, hard to read clearly, and will depend on if the CBSA has had his Timmie's yet that morning. Again, quick Googling seems to indicate as long as the weapon is not classed as restricted, and the owner has the appropriate licensing for that class (restricted or non-), there should be no problem. Ref : http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/im-ex-eng.htm

Then there's always the proper storage and transport laws. http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/fs-fd/storage-entreposage-eng.htm

Again, not an expert, and I'm sure a grumpy CBSA would just love to find a problem with a customized weapon (I gather it's mostly cosmetic customization? Decoration, not function?). Most CBSAs are great people, but just like anything else, you'll find a few grumpy and/or power-trippy people here and there.

We had a pretty amusing experience once coming back home with parts for a kit plane, picked up from a shipping warehouse in Maine and crossed back into Canada through New Brunswick. The poor border agent had never had someone try and cross back into Canada with a van loaded full of plane parts for personal use. Of course, the crates were basically filled with sheet metal and extrusions as it was a very "build it yourself" type of kit, but his face when we tried to explain we drove down to Maine for the weekend to bring back airplane parts for the plane we were building in our basement was priceless. No hassle, though, just a little extra delay as he had to call his supervisor to see how to handle it.
Thank you for your input and advise. :goodjob:

The firearms in question are basically hunting firearms. But highly visually customized. Function , parts, actions have not been modified.

I have briefly chatted with some US Customs officers and after chatting with them about shipping, I felt somewhat discouraged.:dizzy:Will most likely pursue this subject again within the near future.

Once again .......... Thank you ............ :bowing:
 

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No problem. From what I gather, probably easiest to have him come collect them and take them across the border himself. Contacting the Canada Border Service Agency may be more useful than US Customs, usually no one cares too much about what's going OUT of the country, it's what's coming IN that matters.
 

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No problem. From what I gather, probably easiest to have him come collect them and take them across the border himself. Contacting the Canada Border Service Agency may be more useful than US Customs, usually no one cares too much about what's going OUT of the country, it's what's coming IN that matters.
Thank you again for your help. :goodjob:

NOW :excl: Back to BIKES . :excl: :emot-thumbsup:
 
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