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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was looking at lowering kits online, and, while $30 shipped for some adjustable rear dogbone links is quite appealing and more than reasonably priced, I would rather spend $10 for materials and make my own right now instead of wait up to 7 days for the others to arrive.

Here is the finished product. I have yet to lower the front, since I am waiting on the $30, 37mm clip-on handlebars.

Land vehicle Vehicle Motorcycle Car Automotive exhaust

I measured the distance from centerbolt to centerbolt on the stock linkage and came up with 6.5". That, and knowing that the bolt holes are 0.5" (more accurately 12.1mm) was the only necessary information to draw up my interpretation of the aftermarket adjustable dogbones. I guesstimated the spacing between the other bolt holes and came up with 15mm from center to center. The stock links were a little over 1/4" thick.

Text Drawing Diagram Sketch Line

From there I can measure whatever height setting I want and cut/drill the goods. Paid $7 for a 1" x 1/4" x 36" strip of welding steel and $3 for a can of black high-temp spray paint at Lowe's. For these I did 7.5" (190mm) from centerbolt to centerbolt, which would be the second to lowest height setting on the drawing.

Wood Metal

I painted them with the high-temp paint first (to protect from rust), then with some blue paint I already had to match my bike (and look cool). A strip of aluminum of the same dimensions was $12.50+ at Lowe's and would have been rust resistant, also much easier to cut/drill, but I did this for $10 and some blue paint I'd already gotten tons of use out of.

Tool

And installed. I do not know how much they actually dropped the bike, but well over 1". I have enough steel to make another set if I decide to go up or down, but I like where it's at now and the kickstand still works (enough).

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I do not plan on purchasing a kickstand, since the one I like (t-rex) is > $69, which is too much when I can modify my own for < $10. I'll most likely cut off the first 3/4" of the bottom of kickstand and then have a new "foot" welded on after I lower the front and can no longer squeeze by with the stock kickstand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
KICKSTAND UPDATE:

So I took my kickstand off and, in my resourcefulness, took it to the engineering lab on campus nearby where I go to school during spring/fall. I had originally gone down there to find a lab technician who I knew operated his own personal machine shop at home, but he hadn't shown up that day so I spoke to the other guy and explained that I just needed to bend my kickstand to accommodate the height decrease. He seemed pretty cool and unlocked the lab for me. It took about 30 seconds in the hydraulic jack press and then a quick paint job to fix the chips/flakes (and look cool):

Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Leg Auto part

As far as achieving this angle and the spring arm just barely not touching the ground, I just got very lucky. I took a hammer to the foot pad to bend it down so it didn't stick up in the air.

I'm extremely happy with the look of it, but unfortunately it probably won't last after I lower the front. I'll most likely cut off the foot pad and either weld it back on after shortening the stand or just leave it off. But for now I thought I'd share what I thought may be a new solution to the 300 community.
 

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sorry that kickstand looks sketchy...frankly the lowering link look sketchy too, but maybe it's just me.

good job for the effort though, but I'd rather be buying aftermarket link & stand because I can't really fabricate custom parts.
 

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Should have just cut an inch out of the stand and rewelded. Those links look just fine. I installed my daughters by laying the bike on the left side in the grass on a bunch of blankets. Whole job took about 30 minutes.
 
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