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Ok so this is kinda noobish, but When you guys come up at lights? Do you downshift according to speed and let off on the clutch to engine brake? Should you do it? If so, what's the proper method of achieving this without destroying your clutch?
 

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Learn to rev match as you down shift. Also called blipping the throttle. But yes downshift as you come to a stop.


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Discussion Starter #3
Learn to rev match as you down shift. Also called blipping the throttle. But yes downshift as you come to a stop.


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Yeah I just can't seem to ever get it right. I'd been a little lazy and just letting off on the clutch slowly to engage, even though I'm pretty certain this is bad for the gearbox
 

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Yeah I just can't seem to ever get it right. I'd been a little lazy and just letting off on the clutch slowly to engage, even though I'm pretty certain this is bad for the gearbox
It's not bad for the transmission (hooray slipper clutch!), so the only thing really wrong with doing that is it won't work as well on a bike that doesn't have a slipper clutch. You'll get better at rev matching with practice; I couldn't rev match very well when I first started, but the slipper function makes it easy to pick up.
 

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Practice clutchless down shift, it's the easiest way to engine brake. Blip the throttle, down shift at the same time. You'll slow down real fast as it cycle through the gear when down shift.

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I generally downshift as I approach a forced stop, but keep the clutch disengaged. Any braking whether it be with the engine or the brakes themselves is wasted inertia and will hurt economy. Another advantage of anticipating forced stops and decelerating as gradually as practical, is it is very hard for someone to hit you in the rear end, compared to when you stop abruptly, or downshift with no brake light illuminated. I do this in all of my vehicles.

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Mech
 

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When stopping -- I downshift once and then "feel" the clutch out so I can control how much of the engine i want to engage in the slowing. Then do the same for the rest of the gears. Both front and rear brakes are applied as well. I sit up higher and have the bike vertical and aligned straight.
 

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When stopping -- I downshift once and then "feel" the clutch out so I can control how much of the engine i want to engage in the slowing. Then do the same for the rest of the gears. Both front and rear brakes are applied as well. I sit up higher and have the bike vertical and aligned straight.
This 100%. Good post and good explanation oxxxeee.
 

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i clutchless shift down to 2nd gear, cover front & rear brake, tap them while slowing down so brake light comes on, goto 1st when at walking pace, pull clutch just before stopping. i keep it in gear as much as i can just incase i need to open the throttle & get out of someones way
 

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When stopping -- I downshift once and then "feel" the clutch out so I can control how much of the engine i want to engage in the slowing. Then do the same for the rest of the gears. Both front and rear brakes are applied as well. I sit up higher and have the bike vertical and aligned straight.
Everything but the sit higher bit is awesome. You actually want to practice tucking down a bit and lowering your body as you brake so as to keep your bike's CG as stable as possible and as low as possible. When you sit up higher, you shift the system's CG(center of gravity) higher and make all weight transferring more pronounced. While not bad when coming to a nice gradual stop, it'll hose you royally when doing an emergency stop. Last thing you want when you emergency brake is have your higher CG cause weight to shift to the front faster than you can control. This will increase available friction to the front to a point, but will cause you to hit the threshold quicker than anticipated and cause the front to wash out. This is also needed info for when you are engine braking or braking during rain or other slippery conditions. A sudden and stronger weight transfer to the front could cause the front to go beyond what traction is available and cause the front to wash out. The reason why it's important to practice it for planned stops and engine braking, is because you need to build the physical habits to be second nature. You don't want your habit when you brake every time to be standing up tall in the saddle as much as possible. You want to get into the habit of lowering and bracing yourself a bit as you brake. You'll notice a much smoother weight transition from the rear to the front and a lot less flip flopping back and forth.
 

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Everything but the sit higher bit is awesome. You actually want to practice tucking down a bit and lowering your body as you brake so as to keep your bike's CG as stable as possible and as low as possible. When you sit up higher, you shift the system's CG(center of gravity) higher and make all weight transferring more pronounced. ....
Thanks man -- that makes sense. Do they teach that at MSF? I will be taking that next month. I will be tucking and braking this afternoon ;)
 

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Thanks man -- that makes sense. Do they teach that at MSF? I will be taking that next month. I will be tucking and braking this afternoon ;)
I definitely didn't get this lesson during my msf course ha, but week definitely bear it in mind. Always looking for ways to improve my riding. Good stuff!

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You see this with professional riders as they approach a very sharp and technical turn from a high speed section. You'll see them stiffen up their bodies a bit and hunker down a bit more as they brake before they start sliding their body to the inside of the turn. The rest is basic weight and balance information in engineering as far as the why.
 
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