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So I just got my first bike, I haven't gone for a ride yet because I am waiting to take the MSF course and practice my techniques. Now that I got the bike I am a little nervous which I assume is normal but why now in just random conversation with people who don't even know I have a bike they start talking about how their brothers girlfriends aunts uncle got hit on his bike and is still recovering a year later. is it because this has always happened in random conversations but I am just taking notice now that I have my first bike and have not ridden it yet or are outside forces telling me something? I believe its the first reasoning but dang it, these thoughts are getting stuck in my head now and they need to leave.
 

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People always bring up stories about someone getting hurt on a bike, has happened to me many times.
 

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Once you take the msf course you'll forget all the negative thoughts.
 

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Once you take the course you'll feel a heck of a lot more comfortable. Just become familiar with your bike so you can build confidence. Reading posts on here is a great way to do that as well.
 

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The MSF course is excellent and you'll feel very confident. I felt the same way until I took the course. After the course, all the anxiety went away. People like to focus on the negative and point out everything that could go wrong. Take the course, wear the right gear, pay attention to what's going on around you and you'll be fine.
 

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I understand your apprehension.

I told myself this: Riding a bike is never safer than driving a car. So do NOT exacerbate the situation by engaging in unsafe maneuvers.

I have kept my enthusiasm in check so far, and I hope to do so for as long as I ride.
 

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Humans tend to remember the bad stuff while glossing over the good, especially where so many people never experience the good (riding motorcycles). Ignore them and strive to be a safe and sane rider and enjoy life.

Then, cite some accident statistics for cars. ;)

If the person warning you is a smoker, tell them that smoking kills more than all traffic fatalities, drugs, homicides, suicides and fires combined.
 

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I get that all the time. My paramedic buddy really laid it into me too. It comes with the deal. I don't even mention the bike anymore. You should spend some time on the bike before the course if you can get a learners permit like here in California. Then you will be more experienced and have specific questions when you take the MSF.

By time I mean local neighborhood riding on back streets. Good luck
 

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You really need to take those conversations to heart. New riders are more likely to be involved in a motorcycle accident then say riders who are 5 more years seasoned. Like anything we do it life, it's all a matter of experience. You will witness and learn many things while being a motorcyclist that you won't experience in a car. Your first years of riding will be a learning experience that will help you become more aware and better prepared with riding. I know this is the old man in me talking, but you shoud really listen to the older riders with 20+ years of riding experience. Being new, you will make mistakes, we all did. Reducing your chances getting hurt and learning to avoid them is what the learning curve is all about.

Taking the MSF class is just your first step in becoming a motorcyclist. You will need to continue your education by "On the Road Experience". Best advice I can give new riders. Spend most of your money at first on your riding gear and not your bike accessories. Helmet, gloves, boots, jacket, riding pants, and wet weather gear if plan on riding any distance (you will get caught in rain at times). Once you have the proper gear then spend the money to add items and changes to the bike.

Good luck, and be a good rider and not a item of conversation to others.
 

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Taking the MSF class is just your first step in becoming a motorcyclist. You will need to continue your education by "On the Road Experience". Best advice I can give new riders. Spend most of your money at first on your riding gear and not your bike accessories. Helmet, gloves, boots, jacket, riding pants, and wet weather gear if plan on riding any distance (you will get caught in rain at times). Once you have the proper gear then spend the money to add items and changes to the bike.

Good luck, and be a good rider and not a item of conversation to others.
Good advice here. I'm an older (44) experienced rider myself (not the fastest, mind, just experienced) and I agree with this sentiment. Gear should be a top-priority, and never ride without it. ATGATT=All The Gear All The Time.

There's a reason they call them accidents. You don't know when or if they will happen, but you still have to plan for them. When I crashed at 65 mph on the most congested freeway in America (The 405), I was glad to have my full gear on...and I was just going to work. The exact cause of the crash is a mystery and I won't bore you with the details here...but the gear saved my hide. The impact armor protected my arms. Got-away with just a little road rash on each pinky (weird, I know) and a bit of impact bruising. All-told, I came-away pretty well for a freeway crash.
 
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When I first got my bike, everyone in my office gave me crap about how dangerous it is, blah blah blah.

Same stuff I heard when I joined Airborne.

Same stuff I heard when I joined the infantry.

Same stuff I heard when BMXing.

Same stuff I heard when Skateboarding.

People always tend to remember the bad things compared to the good, and their first thought when someone they care about is fear. They'll quiet down sooner or later, but everyone goes down eventually. Whether it's in your driveway due to bad footing, some gravel in a turn, or a car taking you out at a red light, someday you'll go down.

But 100% of the people who drink water die... That's a much worse statistic than motorcycling!
 

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But 100% of the people who drink water die... That's a much worse statistic than motorcycling!

i have used that myself a few times on the forum. its so true

for the o/p check my riders tips in my signature below:)
 

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If you're trying to convince yourself motorcycling isn't dangerous your wrong. It is. However, what you do with your bike and as a rider to mitigate these risks is how you stay safe. I.e. buying gear, improving your riding skill, and in your case taking the MSF course. I took the course and felt a lot better after. Don't let other discourage you to enjoy what you want, there will always be naysayers. Goodluck brah.
 

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There's always an element of danger, but you can mitigate that significantly:

  1. Don't enter corners hotter than you can handle. If your riding buddies are leaving you in the dust, maybe you ought to rethink your riding buddies.
  2. Watch accident videos on YouTube, then ask yourself this question: "What was that person doing right before they lost control of the bike?" Then, DON'T do the thing they were doing, if you can help it - 9 times out of 10 it was dipshit to begin with.
  3. Make sure you keep to your service schedule, and either do the work yourself (with competent supervision if you don't know what the hell you're doing) or make sure the service person is someone you trust.
  4. Give more following distance than you think makes sense. No, seriously. The MSF course will tell you to give 4 seconds of following distance. Can't hurt to double up on that, especially in inclement weather, construction zones, etc...
  5. Decide early on that you'd rather piss off the person behind you by going more slowly than they'd like than speed up to make them happy and risk becoming a statistic.
  6. Ride your own ride - as I mentioned earlier; if your riding buddies are leaving you in the dust, get better riding buddies that'll take into account your newbieness and help you out instead of pressuring you to ride outside of your skill base.
  7. Check your bike frequently for weird shit, and if something feels wrong, take it seriously. Better to pull off the road when you feel strange vibration and have it turn out to be nothing than to ignore it and have something go seriously wrong at highway speeds.
  8. If you get the hang of it and decide you have a taste for speed, keep that shit on the track - screwing around on public roads not only puts yourself in danger, it puts everyone *around* you in danger as well. Don't be a dick.
  9. Find a community of experience bikers, be honest about that fact that you're openly enthusiastic but don't know what the hell you're doing, and ask for help. Ignore the dipshits that give you a ration over asking for help and gravitate to the folks who treat your honesty with the respect it deserves.
  10. Ride often - the more you ride, the more your bike will start to talk to you, and bonding between you and your bike makes for safer riding.
Lastly, try to keep the rubber side pointed toward the road and not the sky. Remember, stupid hurts, so when in doubt *slow the hell down*.

Good luck to you.
 

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But 100% of the people who drink water die... That's a much worse statistic than motorcycling!
*grin*

100% of folk who ride die, too.

Strangely enough, however, drinking water seems to stave off that effect somewhat in the majority of riders, at least for a time.

Beer, on the other hand, reverse-wise. :)
 

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We have a dangerous hobby, I've only been riding for 3 years. What always tell myself is what can I do to reduce risk.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks

All of these are great posts and great advise and thank you all for the tips, as far as gear goes I have an Icon overlord type 1 jacket, some gloves with knuckle protectors and a nice helmet. I am currently looking for some great boots for my 300 and pants and any advice on those would be great because I cant seem to find this where I got my bike. you can bet that I will never get on that bike without that stuff on. thanks again guys and if you can think of more tips I would love to hear them.
 
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