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So I did something really stupid last night. I had just gotten a new lock to chain up my bike and was trying to get the bike close enough to the pillar. Well, I never ended up getting it close enough and gave up and went inside. However, I forgot that I had left the key turned to on when I went inside and it stayed like that for over 9 hours. I'm just glad that nobody stole it honestly. Question I have is, how do I go about starting the bike again? Trickle charger, jump with car, roll down a hill? All of those can be an option if need be. Is the battery completely dead and need to be replaced?


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Unfortunately the only options you have are to charge the battery or jump start it. Bump starting will not work because the ECU and fuel pump need the electric to get the bike started. If you charge the battery make sure to use a trickle charger not a car battery charger because you will ruin the battery. If you jump start it do so thru the battery not at the starter and remove the jumper cables as soon as the bike is running. I used a small (600 cca) booster pack to start my bike after the alarm drain my battery over the winter. No matter how you decide to start the bike go for a ride of at least an 1/2 hr or more to allow the bike to charge it fully. The battery should be fine as long once its charged.

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Wtf. You can definitely bump start it. I left my keys in one day and killed my battery. Dropped it in 2nd, got a friend to push and then popped the clutch. Started right up
 

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Wtf. You can definitely bump start it. I left my keys in one day and killed my battery. Dropped it in 2nd, got a friend to push and then popped the clutch. Started right up

awesome. i suggested similar a few days ago in another thread and was told it wouldn’t work.nice to know it does work:cool:
 

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Wtf. You can definitely bump start it. I left my keys in one day and killed my battery. Dropped it in 2nd, got a friend to push and then popped the clutch. Started right up
That is good to know but didn't work on mine. Koreo did you have any signs of power? Like dash lights or any sounds when u turned your key on and how long was the bike sitting with the key on? My bike sat because of weather for about 3 weeks. Then 4 or 5 days with the dead battery because of alarm drain. It wouldn't bump start because of lack of fuel pressure. My battery was stone dead no lights or sounds the fuel pump couldn't prime and pressurize the system. I'm thinking maybe in your situation your and timing your bike's fuel system stayed primed (key on) till the battery died. I was also told that the bikes most likely will not bump start by the dealer.

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awesome. i suggested similar a few days ago in another thread and was told it wouldn’t work.nice to know it does work:cool:
Done it several times with FI bikes and no worries. Fired up each time.
You just gotta keep an eye on the battery to make sure it was just "dead" and not "killed"..


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I just did the same thing. Rode home, garaged it, left key in "on" position.. for 3 days.

Just borrowed a Battery Tender Jr and removed the battery. Will leave it on for a day or two as recommended. Hopefully, it'll hold a charge!
 

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Your fuel pump will still need the battery to have a minimal amount of amps and voltage on it to power itself. Doesn't take much either. Most "dead" batteries run down till it wont start should still register around 9-10 volts and very little amps left. You'll know if your battery is truly dead when you put a volt meter up to it and it's reading below 8.5 volts or so. Once it goes that low, most chargers wont even charge the batter due to an explosion hazard from force charging dead and damaged cells. Dead batteries that don't have a draw on them will regain a bit of charge back as the electrolytes and plates chemically stabilize. It's barely anything, but it's a good indicator of a brick or not. Should return to around 9 volts of charge or so if it's still good. Your amps will be almost non-existent though.

It takes a huge amount of amps to crank the starter. An engine requires a lot of relative torque to get moving quickly enough to start and it requires a lot of amps to the starter to convert into mechanical energy. Push starting if your battery is still in good condition will still allow the pump to prime enough after a forced cycle.
 

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After 2 days of trickle charging, the light has turned green. Unfortunately, no voltmeter around to check Volt/amp #s. Will have to wait until tomorrow to re-install battery into the bike. Fingers crossed!
 

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volt meter / DMM wont tell you the amps unless the battery is under load. having said that if the voltage of the battery once charged is around the 12-13 volt mark then you *SHOULD* be ok
 

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Started up fine and took it on a nice ride today. After an initial 30 min of riding (freeway and city), I took a chance and stopped it at my friend's shop -- started right up afterwards.

All in all, there were just about 10 start-ups today -- 1 from cold & 1 from 30 min break.

Overall, quite happy with the Battery Tender Jr. -- trickle charged a dead battery for 48 hours.

One thing that I should have done, was to wear gloves when removing the battery and playing with the terminals. (Repeat) lead sulfate contamination is no joke!

volt meter / DMM wont tell you the amps unless the battery is under load. having said that if the voltage of the battery once charged is around the 12-13 volt mark then you *SHOULD* be ok
No volt meter but after today, I feel confident that the bike will start up again fine. If not, I still have the charger.
 

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awesome, sounds like the battery is fine. just watch it though, batteries for car/bike dont like to be fully drained flat. dont be surprised if in next 6-12 months it needs to be replaced
 

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theres 2 kind of "dead" batteries : the no juice whatsoever and the litle juice but bike dosent turn kind .


with the no juice forget about bump starting ... the ignition takes all the juice from the electronics so no juice to start . the second case is a bit better the starter turns or not but some /all lights are on but go dimmed when you try to start that you can bump start ...


well this is based on my car experience but should also apply to bikes
i keep a battery pack in the car and a spare batt at home .
(got the 6/12v/slow/fast charger kind aswell)
 

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awesome, sounds like the battery is fine. just watch it though, batteries for car/bike dont like to be fully drained flat. dont be surprised if in next 6-12 months it needs to be replaced
Unless, the healthy lead acid battery that had gone flat was immediately recharged via a smart battery charger after the electrical load was removed (in this case, right after the ignition key is turned off). Never jump start a bike or car with a dead or weak battery when practical.

If your motorcycle battery is "run down", it should be removed and charged. If this is not practical, a 12 volt booster battery and jumper cables may be used to start the engine.
This is quoted from the Ninja 300 owners manual on page 70.

Charging a lead acid battery with a current higher than the recommended limit will drastically reduce battery life. The reason for this is because for lead acid batteries, once they become less than about 80% charged, they cannot limit recharging current by itself. That is where smart lead acid battery chargers come in. Smart motorcycle battery chargers will limit the current to about no more than 2 or 3 amperes maximum. Smart car battery chargers will limit the current to about no more than 10 or 20 amperes maximum. If one has an amp-meter and a lot of time, it can be easily verified. The charging system in car or motorcycle will harm an under charged lead acid battery. Maximum recharge currents and recommended recharge current rates are often labeled on the battery. Having a clamp-amp meter is quite handy to have to check recharge currents, especially when in vehicle.

There should be no loss of operation battery life if the a battery had gone flat over night and was recharged properly. New AGM batteries should last at least five years, more like 6-8 years if they are never put in use outside their designed operating parameters.

If a lead acid battery was initialized properly (some people call that pre-charging), and the battery was always over 80% charged before being "connected" in a motor vehicle, and the battery is hooked up to a smart charger after the bike is used for the day, that battery can last for over 8 years. I am assuming that all electrical loads on the bike is properly powered by the alternator while running (ie. bike is in stock form electrically), and the battery leakage current is within specs.
 

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you do realise if your battery is flat and you push start the bike and you manage to start it, the bike charging system doesn’t care how flat the battery is, it will still slap out full amperage , same in a car, when the engine is running above about 4000 rpm or so.
 

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you do realise if your battery is flat and you push start the bike and you manage to start it, the bike charging system doesn’t care how flat the battery is, it will still slap out full amperage , same in a car, when the engine is running above about 4000 rpm or so.
I am not getting your point. If I didn't realize that why would I agree with Kawasaki's warning.

The charging system is not a smart charger and will not limit the charging current to a level that is not harmful to the lead acid battery. Hook up a amp meter to it, and see it for yourself. It would do basically what you say and you will see that the charging current will be way above the maximum allowable. After that you will also see a dramatic reduction in operating life. Also service manual test procedure of the charging system would give that information too. That is the problem.

What I am sharing is based on my knowledge and experience. It is my data point. I actually went out of my way to purposely drain out lead acid batteries over night (and longer) until they are flat (and less) and recharge them back in various manner to understand and verify the process. It is kind of like my hobby now. And I would measure both the voltage and current. The use of an ammeter is invaluable to the understanding of re-charging lead acid batteries. :)
 

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I am not getting your point. If I didn't realize that why would I agree with Kawasaki's warning.

The charging system is not a smart charger and will not limit the charging current to a level that is not harmful to the lead acid battery. Hook up a amp meter to it, and see it for yourself. It would do basically what you say and you will see that the charging current will be way above the maximum allowable. After that you will also see a dramatic reduction in operating life. Also service manual test procedure of the charging system would give that information too. That is the problem.
i know the charging system is not a smart charger, i dont need to do the experiments, im an electronics engineer.
depending on the fluid levels in the battery & the age of battery will determine the service life left on the battery.the battery will also have an internal resistance and limit the amount of current it will draw even more so the more charge it takes
 
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