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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
HI everyone, I failed msf. Yes, please laugh all you want :roll2smilie: I aint giving up yet. Almost everyone in my class has experience. I was struggling in day 1. The class move along very quickly. The rider coach never gave me any pointer except keep you head up and look at where you want to go. By day 2, i just couldn't keep up or do the more advance exercises. I was asked by the rider coach for the 4th time since day 1 if i really want to do this. I got so discouraged that i just walk off. BTW...i did not drop my bike once or come close to dropping it. I was just not trusting the bike to lean and look. The result is my turns are running wide most of the time.

Anyway...i don't want to give up cuz i really want to ride. I was thinking of buying a Ninja 300 or maybe a Cbr250 (new or used) to learn at home before taking the msf class again. Do you guys think i can learn from riding around the block, going to a parking lot etc?? Since i already know the basic from the msf class. I think i just need more TIME to practice and learn from my mistakes.
 

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Just make sure you do have some good protective gear to wear, just in case you do fall and see if you can get a few private lessons from a good qualified instructor. Also check out Cruizin's "Tips 4 New Riders", when he pings you his Rainbow links.

If you are running too wide all the time, then you are going in a bit too fast...Slow down a bit. Remember, if you have ever fallen off a bicycle, falling off a motorcycle at high speed is going to hurt a lot more, so you do not want to fall off - ever!...

Also, if you ride your bike without a licence and have a crash, insurance will not cover you. I doubt you will even get insurance in the first place, for that matter!...

The Ninja 300 is a great bike for beginners and experienced riders alike, so the bike is one that can be easily recommended...

Ride safe!...
 

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ninja300>cbr250

I think you would be greatly dissatisfied with the cbr250

the n300 is an EXCELLENT first bike

I would really rather see you take the msf class a second time or get help from a friend rather than buying a brand new bike to practice on (unless you can find one used for a decent price)..

where are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just make sure you do have some good protective gear to wear, just in case you do fall and see if you can get a few private lessons from a good qualified instructor. Also check out Cruizin's "Tips 4 New Riders", when he pings you his Rainbow links.

If you are running too wide all the time, then you are going in a bit too fast...Slow down a bit. Remember, if you have ever fallen off a bicycle, falling off a bike at high speed is going to hurt a lot more, so you do not want to fall off - ever!...

Also, if you ride your bike without a licence and have a crash, insurance will not cover you. You won't even get insurance, for that matter!...

The Ninja 300 is a great bike for beginners and experienced riders alike, so the bike is one that can be easily recommended...

Ride safe!...



Thanks for the tips. I do plan on getting insurance. In New York, you can register and insure your motorcycle with just a permit. I have all the protective gears as well.
 

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Fast Lane Ukraine
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If I was you, I'd buy an old old 250 for like $1,000 and just practice on that. If all you need is time, do NOT buy a new 250. You'll be disappointed. But if all you need is something to practice on, buy the cheapest running small bike you can...
 

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DO NOT BUY A BIKE RIGHT NOW. Check around for private lessons, someone who has more dedicated time to teach you the basics. There may be private lessons available in your area. Then, once you gain the proper basic skills and confidence, sign up again for the MSF class. Running wide will definitely kill you and you need to correct that, ASAP. Buying a bike and practicing on your own and not knowing if you are creating bad habits or not having someone there to correct you is a very bad idea, imo. Good luck.
 

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Fast Lane Ukraine
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DO NOT BUY A BIKE RIGHT NOW. Check around for private lessons, someone who has more dedicated time to teach you the basics. There may be private lessons available in your area. Then, once you gain the proper basic skills and confidence, sign up again for the MSF class. Running wide will definitely kill you and you need to correct that, ASAP. Buying a bike and practicing on your own and not knowing if you are creating bad habits or not having someone there to correct you is a very bad idea, imo. Good luck.
I don't think the ops issue is 'bad habits' per se...as much as it is 'lack of trust' for the bike.

If I was him, and based on the information provided, I would buy the cheapest running motorcycle I could find and beat the crap out of it in a parking lot.

It's really, the same principle as people drive spirited in their car vs those who don't. Most of my friends will not take a certain exit ramp here in Albany, NY at 80mph. I will. Why? I know and trust my car. I know what it can do. Same goes for bikes...once you learn what you are capable of and what the bike can do, you will do those things more easily. Same thing here...given the time to develop that trust, I think the op can correct the running wide issue without any formal training or 'private lessons' (I have never seen those offered, by the way, here in NY).
 

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Buy something used. the cbr 250 feels lighter than the 300 and is a bit more peppier down low. I suggest a used cbr 250 to learn on.
 

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DO NOT BUY A BIKE RIGHT NOW. Check around for private lessons, someone who has more dedicated time to teach you the basics. There may be private lessons available in your area. Then, once you gain the proper basic skills and confidence, sign up again for the MSF class. Running wide will definitely kill you and you need to correct that, ASAP. Buying a bike and practicing on your own and not knowing if you are creating bad habits or not having someone there to correct you is a very bad idea, imo. Good luck.
I tend to agree with Antiant. Invest in lessons rather than a bike. You want to be learning the 'right' stuff and in the process, confirm that this is a hobby you truly want to get into. Some stuff comes naturally for people and the same thing takes a bit more work/effort for others. I would hate for you to buy a bike then decide its not for you and now you're in the hole for a new bike. Don't get me wrong, this is not meant to be negative but just putting things in perspective. I took a local riding course and saw people in my class simply walk off because they couldn't do some of the basics. Keep at it and let us know how things progress
 

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I don't think the ops issue is 'bad habits' per se...as much as it is 'lack of trust' for the bike.
Re-read. I said the OP can create bad habits if he/she practices alone and there is no one pointing it out. If you can't pass a simple MSF class, you have no business buying a brand new bike yet, imo. OP needs a mentor, private lessons, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thank you everyone for your great tips and concerns for my safety. Let me give you guys more info as to why i choose to buy a 250cbr or 300r to learn.

1. I do plan on taking the msf class again at the end of riding season.
2. I choose cbr250 or ninja300 because they are the cheapest bike with ABS option.
3. In NY, you cant ride a motorcycle alone with just a permit. My brother passed his MSF class months ago will be watching me or following me around the block with his car. He's just a noob like me, but he should be able to give me some pointers.
4. If i find out that riding is really not for me, i can just give the bike to my brother.
5. Private lessons are a great idea but with a full time job it's going to be hard.
6. I will be practicing at an empty parking lot or around the blocks by my brother's house ONLY. (Long Island, isolated area, very low traffic/cars)
Safety is my #1 concern.

once again, i want to thanks everyone for the tips.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't think the ops issue is 'bad habits' per se...as much as it is 'lack of trust' for the bike.

If I was him, and based on the information provided, I would buy the cheapest running motorcycle I could find and beat the crap out of it in a parking lot.

It's really, the same principle as people drive spirited in their car vs those who don't. Most of my friends will not take a certain exit ramp here in Albany, NY at 80mph. I will. Why? I know and trust my car. I know what it can do. Same goes for bikes...once you learn what you are capable of and what the bike can do, you will do those things more easily. Same thing here...given the time to develop that trust, I think the op can correct the running wide issue without any formal training or 'private lessons' (I have never seen those offered, by the way, here in NY).

I agreed with you, i think that's my problem. I just lack confidence to lean the bike and trust that it will go where i am looking at. I feel that if i were just to re-take the msf, i will be making the same mistakes. I feel i can get more confidence by practicing on my own (with my brother on my side). Once i am confidence, i will re-take msf and hopefully pass with flying color.
 

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What advice can you give me about the class? I am taking it in May.
Bring plenty of water, light fruit snacks. Don't wear full gear. I wouldn't even recommend a full face, may be too hot and you aren't going fast. Wear light colored clothing, light and loose fitting stuff. Other than that, have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What advice can you give me about the class? I am taking it in May.

My advice is to relax and have fun. In my class, almost eveyone has experience. There are some that rides dirt bike all their life and there are people that already have a bike. I think it's only me and another person that is completely zero experience. If i knew this ahead of time, i would probably take a few private lessons first.

I hope you have a great teacher as well. My teacher encourage me to quit from day one. I will definitely go to a differnent msf school next time around.
 

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Hey, maybe there are some fellow New Yorkers willing to help out on this forum near by and can take you under their wing. :)
 

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Fast Lane Ukraine
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Anti...re-read my post please.

I didn't say buy a new bike. I said buy a cheap ass bike that you can feel no remorse in dropping...something dirt cheap that if he decides he doesn't want to pursue riding he can just resell or chalk up as a lesson instead of a $5000 lesson. Hell a cheap small dirt bike will do. Just something to learn how to lean.

Then, re-read his post. I understood it as his issue is trusting his machine (which he confirmed). No amount of pointers will help you trust your machine better, so the lessons you suggest, will be utterly useless. Trust is an internal issue between you and your bike, nothing else. It took me a few rides to trust my Ninja again after my accident and now I am back to taking exit ramps, etc. at the same angles I was prior to my accident.

He needs to get ON a bike, IN a parking lot, and just go round, and round, and round, and round....and round until he gets more comfortable leaning the bike into a corner.

Hence, buy a cheap ass dirt bike or old bike and go to town in a parking lot. You drop it? Pick it up and try again. Rinse, repeat.

That's what I would do.

Also, sounds like his brother rides, so worst case, he now has someone to point out his mistakes. But again, I don't think his issue is 'mistakes' as much as it is just not leaning far enough into a corner to point the bike where it needs to go due to him feeling like the bike is going to fall over or something else..
 

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Ilya, you're confusing my words, the other stuff was added on and not directed at you. I should have broke that part of the sentence up, my bad.
 

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If I was you, I'd buy an old old 250 for like $1,000 and just practice on that. If all you need is time, do NOT buy a new 250. You'll be disappointed. But if all you need is something to practice on, buy the cheapest running small bike you can...
+1

Buy the cheapest 250 you can find that runs on craiglist and practice. Nighthawk, CBR, Ninja 250 even some small dirt bikes (100/125 4 stroke) etc...

You will most likely do a low speed drop at some point so might as well get something you wont cry about.

My 2 cents...
 
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