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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey fellow riders,

Wondering if any of you handy mechanics out there have replaced a cam chain in any bike? My bike makes a intermittent loud ticking at idle/low rpms, but only ever when the bike is cold. Definitely sounds like valve train noise of a kind.

However, if you saw my other thread, I was recently in my motor, and my valve clearances are set, and valves looked good. Cams and buckets looked perfect as well.

The last thing in there that could be noisy I am thinking is the fact that my chain is stretched kinda a lot. Most people seemed to say online that rest assured, a stretched chain on a stock motor, especially our engine, will not even come close to allowing valves to hit the piston. So I am not worried about that so much.

But the only part of the valve train I haven't replaced is the tensioner and chain. The tensioner seems to be working okay, but the chain is stretched quite a bit, so maybe it is having trouble doing its job.

Here's the problem though. To replace the cam chain, manual says to split the engine. I really don't want to do that. All the time and energy and money involved in just taking it apart is insane.

I am wanting to buy a new chain, and rivet it in if I can. That would make the whole job entirely cost effective, in time and money. I've seen mixed opinions on whether or not riveting a cam chain is a good or bad idea. Some people say only do it in an emergency, others say they have done it to their bike over and over throughout a long life with lots of miles and say it is great. Obviously, they make tools for riveting and breaking cam chains, so it can't be a totally bad idea right? I mean, this isn't no ZX10 or something...

I am certain I am careful and skilled enough to install the chain via riveting if I can get the parts and tools. I am just wondering how good or bad of a practice this is...

Thoughts fellas?
Thanks.
-Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I decided to kick off this repair with a new tensioner. It's a common failure point, mine is old, and I would need to replace it eventually anyway. So I have that on the way. Will see if the noise is reduced with the new tensioner.

-Mike
 
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