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OK so I was approaching an intersection a tad too fast (because I had just got off the freeway and everything on the street felt like slow motion) and the light turned yellow on me!

I assessed that it wasn't safe to gun it and there was no car behind me so I decided to stop.

I guess I squeezed the front brake too hard. I heard skidding sounds from my front tire and then the ABS kicked in. It momentarily released the front brake allowing the wheel to unlock, and then quickly resumed braking.

I came to a complete stop really fast and it was sooo smooth. I only came to realize and reflect on what had happened after I came to a complete stop.

For a newbie like me, this could have turned out worse had I not have ABS on this bike.
 

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I've yet been able to activate the ABS yet and I've done some hard braking. You must have really jumped on the levers at first hard instead of progressively. How many fingers did you brake with? Have you tried using less fingers on the lever? I have found that using just two fingers, I can get on the lever almost as hard as I want without locking due to my two fingers obviously not able to quickly clamp down as hard as all four fingers. It makes it easier for me to get the progressive feel on the levers.
 

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I can get my ABS to kick in at pretty much any speed, I practice emergency braking every now and then on my way home from work just to remember how tight I can squeeze before it kicks in.
In the manual it states a speed that it stops working at, I think It's like 5 or 10mph and it'll lock under that speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was using 2 fingers and TBH I don't recall grabbing it that hard, but it probably was hard enough to activate ABS. I think the road may have been a little wet but don't recall exactly. I didn't really think too much of it at the time and I just kinda went on my way like normal lol
 

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I can get my ABS to kick in at pretty much any speed, I practice emergency braking every now and then on my way home from work just to remember how tight I can squeeze before it kicks in.
In the manual it states a speed that it stops working at, I think It's like 5 or 10mph and it'll lock under that speed.
I practice emergency braking all the time too, but I use a very progressive touch to the brakes so they wont lock. My cruiser does NOT have ABS and the front has large dual rotors with SS lines and HH sintered pads. If I didn't use a progressive touch with the right technique, I can lock that wheel easily. Even with two fingers. That's the trick to hard braking in the shortest amount of time. A progressive approach. You immediately do about 80% or so of what the max braking pressure you think it would be, then steadily increase pressure till you feel a tiny vibration. That vibration is your wheel right on it's friction coefficient limit. which on most road tires for motorcycles is around 1.2-1.6Gs. If you put any more pressure or shift your weight back, you'll lock the wheel.

That's another part to hard braking. When you are braking, you are pinching the tank and stiffening up your core. At the same time you should be lowering your body as much as you can into a tuck. The legs and core will prevent your body from jerking forward and shifting your CG forward and back while the tuck will lower your CG making your braking and traction more effective and balanced. While you are putting more pressure on the front brake, you are also letting pressure OFF the rear brake. As your weight shifts forward and loads the front, the rear is getting unloaded and it's losing traction fast. If you don't remove pressure from the rear as you put pressure on the front the rear will lock and now you're going to low side or high side. But you can't let this scare you, both brakes are needed to fully maximize your braking efficiency. A bit of practice will do you some good. Don't be afraid to use the rear brakes and remember as said before, ABS is not on below 6 mph. So you can lock your wheels below that point and still have a spill so don't be overly aggressive practicing thinking you are immune to having an incident.
 

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How low does your brake fluid level get on the handlebar reservoir during hard breaking? Mine goes down to the bottom of the circle shaped window.

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How low does your brake fluid level get on the handlebar reservoir during hard breaking? Mine goes down to the bottom of the circle shaped window.

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I don't believe it should be dropping much at all. The master cylinder is there to pressurize the system and is not a full reservoir so it's not sending the fluid in it through the system, it's pressurizing the system. When you hold onto the front brake, look at your brake lines and check your calipers. Also check to see if your master cylinder is indicating empty or low or not. Release the lever and recheck your lines and calipers. Your calipers should be setup to where it looks like the pads are barely just touching and your lines when pressurized should move and firm up a bit, but should not balloon up or swell a lot. If when you release the brakes and the reservoir looks full again, it might mean that you have a bunch of air in your lines. The mechanic who setup your bike may not have bled the lines properly after filling up the master cylinder.
 

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I don't believe it should be dropping much at all. The master cylinder is there to pressurize the system and is not a full reservoir so it's not sending the fluid in it through the system, it's pressurizing the system. When you hold onto the front brake, look at your brake lines and check your calipers. Also check to see if your master cylinder is indicating empty or low or not. Release the lever and recheck your lines and calipers. Your calipers should be setup to where it looks like the pads are barely just touching and your lines when pressurized should move and firm up a bit, but should not balloon up or swell a lot. If when you release the brakes and the reservoir looks full again, it might mean that you have a bunch of air in your lines. The mechanic who setup your bike may not have bled the lines properly after filling up the master cylinder.
Thanks, how much does it drop on your ninja?

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Thanks, how much does it drop on your ninja?

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Should be barely perceptible. Just enough to cover the expansion of the lines. The calipers are practically touching the rotors already so it shouldn't drop any from that. The only other reason for you to notice any drop would be if your brake fluid really heated up and lost viscosity. But even then shouldn't go below the sight glass. Have your dealership inspect the brake system. At worst, something isn't working properly and at best will just require them to bleed the brakes properly and top up again. Either way, you should not pay a penny since if it's the first it's a warranty issue and if it's the second it's a setup failure by the dealership.
 

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There shouldn't be any skidding from you front or rear tire. I've activated my ABS and it's just a vibration in the brake lever and the bike comes to a stop without locking up. ABS can apply or release braking pressure 15 times per second, so it should be impossible to lock up the front or rear wheel. If mine ever locked up to make the bike skid, I'd definitely take in in to get it checked out.
 

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I had several similar incidents in my first week of riding, and it certainly made me glad I chose the ABS.

I was debating getting an R6 (no ABS available) for my next bike, but imagining panic braking at highway speeds without ABS is just terrifying.
 

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How low does your brake fluid level get on the handlebar reservoir during hard breaking? Mine goes down to the bottom of the circle shaped window.

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Are you looking at the window while in the act of braking? If so, then your fluid is just rushing to the front of the reservoir. It's not getting used.
Or if you're looking at it while the bike is stationary, then you might have an issue.
 

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Are you looking at the window while in the act of braking? If so, then your fluid is just rushing to the front of the reservoir. It's not getting used.
Or if you're looking at it while the bike is stationary, then you might have an issue.
Yes, I am looking at the window while in the act of hard braking. I notice this when I practice quick stops. So are you saying inertia is what's causing the fluid level to drop to the bottom of the window?
Can anyone verify this please?

I still think there should be enough fluid in the system for the level not to drop so low.

How low does the brake fluid level drop on your bike during hard braking?

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Yes, I am looking at the window while in the act of hard braking. I notice this when I practice quick stops. So are you saying inertia is what's causing the fluid level to drop to the bottom of the window?
Can anyone verify this please?

I still think there should be enough fluid in the system for the level not to drop so low.

How low does the brake fluid level drop on your bike during hard braking?

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That's exactly what I'm saying, it's not actually "dropping". Look at your reservoir after you come to a complete stop while holding the same pressure on the front brake.

to illustrate what I'm saying I've made you a super awesome picture in mspaint
Super-awesome-physics-picture.png
 

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That's exactly what I'm saying, it's not actually "dropping". Look at your reservoir after you come to a complete stop while holding the same pressure on the front brake.

to illustrate what I'm saying I've made you a super awesome picture in mspaint
View attachment 2384
Except it shouldn't be WHILE USING the brakes. First of all, it's not really a reservoir. It's more a pressure pump. It doesn't hold all of the system fluid between actuation of the system. Inertia should NOT be moving that fluid while braking to make it look empty. That fluid when actuated is under a lot of pressure and should be sitting very steady at that point. Under all that pressure it's not going to slosh around.

On a costly sport bike you CAN get a separate master cylinder and reservoir in which case, yes the reservoir levels would slosh around even when braking.
 

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Thank you for all the help. I am going to take it to the dealer for inspection. Brakes are kind of important imo.
It would really be helpful if 2 or 3 people could tell me what happens in their front brake pressure pump window when they brake hard.


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Thank you for all the help. I am going to take it to the dealer for inspection. Brakes are kind of important imo.
It would really be helpful if 2 or 3 people could tell me what happens in their front brake pressure pump window when they brake hard.


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I took the bike to a shop I trust. They verified what adamjh said. Inertia is pulling the fluid to the front of the pressure pump. The guy at the shop said its normal. Thanks for all the help guys.

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