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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
My answer was NOT for you because of your American model.
Understood. I'm just curious that one model with a stock O2 sensor behaves like another model without a stock O2 sensor. I guess the programming is different, so just removing the O2 sensor without changing the programming, how does that help?

BTW, the EJK is said to come with an O2 by-pass connector for models that need it. (I'd double check when ordering.) The California American model should have an O2 sensor since California has more strict emissions standards.
 

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Thanks, I didn't even know my bike had an oxygen sensor. I tried removing the connector but I couldn't, it's just stuck there. Did you remove it yourself and have any tip you could share?
You're welcome.
Yes, the connection is a little bit tight so if you're not able to disconnect the cable you could carefully assist with a screwdriver.
But very important, don't disconnect the sensor and start the engine unless you have the eliminator to plug it in, since this will throw an errorcode in the bikes FI-system and with the EX300 the errorcodes can not be deleted in the ECU (like it is with the EX250-FI), on the EX300 only the light will not illuminate any more.
 

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Understood. I'm just curious that one model with a stock O2 sensor behaves like another model without a stock O2 sensor. I guess the programming is different, so just removing the O2 sensor without changing the programming, how does that help?

BTW, the EJK is said to come with an O2 by-pass connector for models that need it. (I'd double check when ordering.) The California American model should have an O2 sensor since California has more strict emissions standards.
It's very possible that the American model comes with a different programming, since this is common in the automotive business and also happens with the motorcycles.
Just take a look at the give hp-numbers from European and the same American model and you will find out that nearly all models for the American market have lower hp-numbers.
This could be seen very good with the 600, 750 and 1000 Supersports and also when you take a look for cars it's well to be seen (and here please don't start any discussion about the VW-Diesel thing, since this is a VERY different political story!).
One reason for this is the given speed-limit in America and the second one might be the lower-level quality of American fuels (if you don't believe about that please do a search in the web where everything about that can be found, but please don't discuss that with me because I didn't/don't make the rules).
Here is everything else what could cause the problem with your bike (from the EX300-Manual).
Poor Running at Low Speed:
Spark weak:

Battery voltage low
Spark plug dirty, broken, or maladjusted
Stick coil wiring trouble
Stick coil not in good contact
Spark plug incorrect
IC igniter in ECU trouble
Crankshaft sensor trouble
Stick coil trouble
Fuel/air mixture incorrect:
Bypass screw maladjusted
Air passage clogged
Air cleaner clogged, poorly sealed, or missing
Fuel tank air vent obstructed
Fuel pump trouble
Throttle body assy holder loose
Air cleaner duct loose
Compression low:
Spark plug loose
Cylinder head not sufficiently tightened down
No valve clearance
Cylinder, piston worn
Piston ring bad (worn, weak, broken, or sticking)
Piston ring/groove clearance excessive
Cylinder head warped
Cylinder head gasket damaged
Valve spring broken or weak
Valve not seating properly (valve bent, worn, or carbon accumulation on the seating surface)
Other:
IC igniter in ECU trouble
Throttle body assy not synchronizing
Engine oil viscosity too high
Drive train trouble
Brake dragging
Air suction valve trouble
Air switching valve trouble
Engine overheating
Clutch slipping
 

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You're welcome.
Yes, the connection is a little bit tight so if you're not able to disconnect the cable you could carefully assist with a screwdriver.
But very important, don't disconnect the sensor and start the engine unless you have the eliminator to plug it in, since this will throw an errorcode in the bikes FI-system and with the EX300 the errorcodes can not be deleted in the ECU (like it is with the EX250-FI), on the EX300 only the light will not illuminate any more.
Thanks for the advice. I ordered the oxygen sensor eliminator and will try to remove it once that arrives. To be honest I assumed that the error code could be reset easily, but I guess that's not how motorcycle ECUs work :grin2:
The K&N air filter arrived today and I immediately installed it. I have to say that the first impression is that it did smooth out the fuel delivery on throttle open and close a bit. I'll have to ride more to come to a conclusion but the first impression is positive (and it also made the bike a tiny bit louder, which is always nice :smile2:).
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I have my EJK installed. (It did come with an O2 sensor by-pass, but I didn't need it.) I'm not sure how I feel about it yet. I get the sense that acceleration is smoother, especially 1st to 2nd gear. Cracking the throttle open and blipping seems a little smoother. Closing the throttle still leads to abrupt engine braking, but I doubt that that could be changed with just a fuel controller. I was able to remove the baffle from my slip-on Yoshimura and the bike sounds nicer. I does crackle a little off-throttle--which I kinda like--but it doesn't pop like it used to. I haven't played with the settings much. The mild improvements from the default settings might not be enough for me to want to keep the EJK. Not for $225. I'll ask the manufacturer for some suggested tweaks and play around a little. There is a money-back option within the first 30 days. I'd hate to take it out, but it needs to justify its existence still!
 

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I think this is really obvious, or perhaps some of you don't care... but here's how these issues can be solved with a "for track use only" ECU re-flash... (same track use only disclaimer for EJK and PCV)

1. The ECU is wiped clean from any errors, and the narrow band emissions O2 sensor and it's closed loop strategy are removed and the sensor bung plugged, and you no longer get an error code from having the sensor unplugged.
2. The timing tables and fuel tables and secondary throttle mapping is adjusted to make the throttle buttery smooth (even more important at the track).
3. Power is improved.
4. All of the add-on band-aids previously purchased can be sold
5. Cost less to flash the ECU than the EJK or PCV, and it's capable of significantly more
6. Unlimited re-flash if needed, stock flash re-installed and money refunded if unhappy with the result.
7. Enable's the ECU's Quick Shifter (needs an additional normally/open type sensor setup)
8. No more lean popping during deceleration
9. Air fuel ratios are set up in the 13.0 to 13.6 range depending on rpm and throttle position (set to a leaner 14.4 for idle), and there's usually no need to adjust beyond slightly for the exhaust system characteristics if you're running a stock engine with typical mods.
10 Set up to run premium fuel, or race gas with a lower specific gravity, or oxygenated fuel, these are simple changes.

Hope that makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
If an ECU flash wasn't so expensive I'd consider it. Didn't the cost double from around $100 to $200? At least the EJK offers the fun factor of being adjustable, and it can be removed and sold separately from the bike. (I'll probably have a different bike by next year.)
 

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I got a quote for 500€ for the ECU reflash on a tuning shop in Italy (200€ for the "access key" and 300€ for the remap)... if I found one willing to do it for $200 I'd jump on it right away. Guess it's time to e-mail more garages :p
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I'm considering bikes with carburators instead of fuel injection for my next bike since I'm planning to get something older anyway.
 

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So, the oxygen sensor arrived today. It was the wrong connector though, so I decided to go and buy 2 330 Ohm resistors and do the job myself. I started the engine with no error codes, so I must have done the mod correctly.
I rode for about 20 minutes and noticed absolutely no difference in the throttle smoothness. I will keep it this way to see if there's any difference in the fuel consumption anyways.
It's a shame that not even the EJK fixes the issue. I contacted another tuning garage and if I decide to remap the ECU I will let you know of the results.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
So, the oxygen sensor arrived today. It was the wrong connector though, so I decided to go and buy 2 330 Ohm resistors and do the job myself. I started the engine with no error codes, so I must have done the mod correctly.
I rode for about 20 minutes and noticed absolutely no difference in the throttle smoothness. I will keep it this way to see if there's any difference in the fuel consumption anyways.
It's a shame that not even the EJK fixes the issue. I contacted another tuning garage and if I decide to remap the ECU I will let you know of the results.
The EJK helps somewhat. I'm considering sending it back and trying the mail-in flash tune for $200 USD. (Not including shipping.) They will restore it to stock if I don't like it. I'd just have to mail it in again. The other option is just to wait until I get a different bike...like a CBR!
 

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I will take some time here to provide som input and about some things that many of us have learned over the years... Throttle abruptness is something that needs good tuning skills to refine, and not just for riding around on the street, because for racers, it's more critical than outright power... the ability to apply power at lean even if it's not maximum lean (where you may apply more than just a fraction) is very important. So don't discount the people who tune bikes for the track. One of my favorite motorcycle books was written by Troy Bayliss himself, and it's titled "A Faster Way"... he devotes a lot of time to the importance of the engine mapping/electronics part of the equation, and especially on the subject of throttle abruptness.

From my experience, addressing the following strategies/considerations are effective in this area... some can be adressed by piggy-back devices, but it's more appropriate to do so directly with the ECU:
1. Make sure that the motorcycle is healthy and working properly, and that the throttle position sensors are properly set up, that there are no vacuum leaks, that the butterflies are properly set up, and that the throttle controls are properly routed. These points are carefully looked at on a proper race bike as well.
2. Emissions... I don't want to kill any trees in this world, but there are a lot of emissions driven factors that would be eliminated on a race bike. The OEM emissions strategy is lean, and even leaner when decelerating, and injecting air into the exhaust system to further burn any hot unburned fuel escaping the exhaust during the valve overlap. This needs to be addressed.
3. Proper fuel mapping... overall the way the engine behaves is lean tends to be jerky, rich tends to be lazy.
4. Proper ignition mapping... ignition advance strategy can really soften or awaken the throttle response in certain areas. Yamaha has just recently started to address their throttle jerkyness with this with their factory tunes, but many of us have been doing this for decades. If you're ever in Phoenix, I can show you the evolution of the ignition maps and how Yamaha has dramatically improved it on their stock maps just starting in 2016.
5. Accelerator pump function... the fuel needs are different with rapid opening of the throttle compared to a slow and gradual opening... the carb days we needed an accelerator pump to add fuel for transient applications of power, and modern ECU's have strategies to mimic this... you can really feel how the engine reacts and can be coerced to behave appropriately with this function.
6. Engine tuning dynamics (cams, valve sizes, port sizes, compressions, exhaust tuning) all play a role and sometimes present a challenge, and these characteristics can be tamed with ECU tuning strategies for the most part.
7. With fly by wire and secondary butterfly systems, the throttle system can also be tuned and this is an important part of the strategy. The ECU tuning needs to be able to manage this function effectively.

Finally, there are so many parameters to change and play with that it's easy to get lost. Most off the shelf tunes I have played with weren't very good.... although they have been surprisingly consistent from bike to bike. The higher the state of tune for an engine (high compression, high RPM, aggressive cams, aggressive timing, aggressive fuels) the narrower the range is for a good tune. The RS motor for the Ducati I have has almost 15:1 compression, 40 degrees of valve overlap (that's a lot), has huge intake and exhausts, light crank and flywheel, so it's considered a high state of tune, and the mapping needs to be very precise or it will buck and surge pretty good. It's tuned to run very smooth and user friendly (I'm not that good of a rider to manage it otherwise). Street bikes with a lower state of tune are a lot easier to get right, and the range where they run outstandigly is considerably bit wider.

My Ninja 300 is tuned pretty good now, but I don't have any more than around the block once experience on the stock setup, so I'm not too familiar with your abruptness issue. On some of my other bikes it was really bad, and now it's perfect :)

I've plugged the flashed Ninja 300 ECU into a few other bikes to see, and it seems to work excellent, even older bikes. I have a few spare ECU's and once flashed, they also seem to interchange between 2014 2013 2015 without any issues (not the case with the stock ECU, as some of the emissions systems are a different strategy. There can always be some more tweaks depending on exhaust systems and wanting good fuel mileage, things like that... and if tuning with a wideband O2 sensor, plug or block the exchaust plates or they will throw off the wideband and cause drivability annoyances on their own.

So believe me, the abrupt throttle response you're experiencing can most definitely be managed.
 
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Might help...

I was getting jerky throttle...plus late engage...throttle cable problem yes...but it had slipped off the "winding wheel" in the "box" on the handlebar. I didn't have to trace back behind ferrings and such.
Youtube on what i discovered...might be better than the words I've chosen. :)
Sorry it won't let me post links but YouTube search for "Ninja 300 throttle control issue...temporary fix"
 

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This sounds like exactly the problem the BoosterPlug (boosterplug.com) was designed to solve. I haven't installed mine yet, but reviews and videos I"ve seen all say that it works as advertised. Since I just put a Musarri GP Street Series on my Ninja and am gonna put a high-flow air filter in, I figure the BoosterPlug should do what a PowerCommander would do for a lot cheaper, plus all the purported benefits of eliminating jerky throttle and so on.
 

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I'll report back... I've never removed all the fairings before though, and it looks like I need to do that in order to be able to unbolt the tank and lift it a couple inches so I can reach in and unplug the AIT sensor plug and plug in the BoosterPlug (the AIT connector is about 2-3" behind the two bolts at the base of the tank where it meets the seat... if anyone has any tips for reaching it without taking the bike apart so much I'd appreciate it. So it'll be a few days/maybe a couple weeks before I get to it unless I put off more important stuff to work on the bike.
 

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Just looking at a service manual... looks like I can just remove the side covers, the seat, the tank side covers, and then I'll be in a position to take the tank bolts off and lift it just enough to get to that connector. Should be easier than I thought. I'd only found one video of BoosterPlug installation, in Chinese I believe, and the guys clearly showed where the connector is but already had the bike completely disassembled (all fairings, tank completely off) so it made it look more intensive than it should be. Will probably try to get to it tonight now that I have a better idea what I'm up to. :)
 

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Just looking at a service manual... looks like I can just remove the side covers, the seat, the tank side covers, and then I'll be in a position to take the tank bolts off and lift it just enough to get to that connector. Should be easier than I thought. I'd only found one video of BoosterPlug installation, in Chinese I believe, and the guys clearly showed where the connector is but already had the bike completely disassembled (all fairings, tank completely off) so it made it look more intensive than it should be. Will probably try to get to it tonight now that I have a better idea what I'm up to. :)
Thanks for your effort! I have a feeling I will install this also. The abrupt throttle would be nice to lessen some...
 

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Ok, so I installed the BoosterPlug tonight. Turned out to not be a hard job. Side covers, seat, tank side covers, four bolts for the tank, and then I was able to lift the tank a couple inches and prop a stick under it to hold it up so I could reach in and get to the connector. Then I ran the temperature sensor to a spot under the back seat where it's not visible unless you look, put it back together, and I was done. How does it work? Exactly as advertised. I was kind of surprised because I'm a bit skeptical about most claims, but it makes a noticeable difference. It feels like a much more refined ride, and it made my exhaust sound a lot better. Gear 1 is now really smooth and seems to go further, acceleration in general is much smoother, power seems more uniform... basically everything it promised to do on the box, it did. I'm pretty happy with it.

I should have taken video, but I did take a couple of pictures, I just don't know how to post them here. If I figure that out I'll post them. All in all, though, given that I'm not racing on a track, I think this BoosterPlug will basically do the job of something like a PowerCommander but with much more simplicity and a much lower price. Waiting for a high-flow air filter, we'll see how that works with the boosterplug.
 
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