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Got it done today. ~$191. Before anyone asks why I didn't do it myself, I lack tools and a garage to store them in so I'd have to spend money either way.

Anyways, they did the standard oil filter change, cable lube/check etc but they did more than that. Fixed my high idle and it's twitches/jumping. Washed n waxed it, etc. bike actually feels better than when I bought it. That said there is a, "problem". When they fixed my loose idle speed cable and the other cables for fittings, my friction zone size and sensitivity shifted and I lost my muscle memory because I'm used to the old setting... Sooooo it's back to the parking lots for me to learn the new areas and settings. I'll get it again though; almost had it already on the way home. sucks I won't be able to ride again until Christmas day but... (I refuse to ride my bike on the weekend mornings to work because of all the drunk drivers and general idiots out on the road after midnight... And I report to work at 4 am sooooo yeah I'm out in the thick of them.) Yeah I'm glad I'm gtg until the next service interval.

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Wow, that's an expensive oil change... But like you said, without a garage/workspace and tools, you're kinda at their mercy. The wash/wax is nice, not every dealer does that.

-THE DON
 

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As much as that was I've seen much higher prices quoted on google so it's hard to complain too much; they did more than just a standard change of oil and filter. I feel real good about them doing it. Like I said, it feels like a completely new motorcycle and everything seems tight and squared away... And it's still cheaper than my car maintenance ****

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Did mine yesterday. $120. I also have to be at work at 4am. I get on the road at three. Been lucky so far.


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$150-$200 seems to be the norm for most bikes. Not really that bad when they DO all the checks and not just a glorified oil and filter change. Good to hear of a Dealer doing things as they should.
Ride Safe !!


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So I have a question for the guys doing their own oil changes/service.

What are the "checks" and can they be done with just a garage and a stand? Is it just a matter of cleaning the chain and topping off fuids, or are there some internal components that actually require attention?

I have a nice covered space to put my bike on a stand and change the oil, but should I just pay a shop to give the bike a full inspection? I've been debating this.

-THE DON
 

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There is usually a check list in most O/M.

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Discussion Starter #8
So I have a question for the guys doing their own oil changes/service.

What are the "checks" and can they be done with just a garage and a stand? Is it just a matter of cleaning the chain and topping off fuids, or are there some internal components that actually require attention?

I have a nice covered space to put my bike on a stand and change the oil, but should I just pay a shop to give the bike a full inspection? I've been debating this.

-THE DON
There's a checklist in the back for the recommended schedule of things to check.

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Triumph/BMW does the 500 mile first service free. Triumph uses Castrol 10W50 4t racing oil full synthetic on my Street Triple r. Even though there was no charge, I got an invoice. It would have been $216.11. That seems more typical. They did check over everything and take it for a test ride too. On the other hand, Alamo Cycle Plex in San Antonio is advertising a dino oil change (only) for $40 that includes labor and the oil. My guess is, by the time they add a $15 filter, washer, tax, oil disposal, it will be closer to $65, but that's still a good price, although it is SO simple to do the oil change yourself for less than half that in materials even if you use a full synthetic. In fact, you could easily buy all the tools you would need...allen wrenches (if you remove the lower fairing), a metric socket set, oil filter wrench, and still be under $65
 

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did my own oil change. 30 bucks. took 10 minutes. you dont need to take off the fairing.
I don't know about anyone else, but I had to remove the right lower fairing to remove the stock filter. That thing was installed by some Hulk/Godzilla hybrid; I couldn't get any leverage with the fairing in the way.

I ended up stabbing a screwdriver through it and twisting it off.

I installed the new filter a bit beyond hand tight, so should be easy enough to remove with the fairings in place.
 

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i used a 1/4" ratchet with 2 extensions and an oil filter cap... :d


AHAHA yeah thats how I take off ALL my filters on any vehicle regardless. Why bother strain yourself? lol
 

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I used the store bought strap wrench and I too had to take the side fairing off to loosen the filter, but that is a piece of cake compared to the Ninja 650r for example. I only hand-tightened my filter and there are no oil leaks. Next time I can probably remove it without taking off the fairing. I always put a crescent wrench to loosen my strap because I never knew the ratchet would fit the end, so I learned something from the video. Thanks for posting.
 

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After singing the praises of the strap oil filter remover, I couldn't loosen the dang filter today. Bought a wrench that looks kind of like channel locks from Auto Zone. Works really well and easily. I just couldn't get the right angles to use the strap because of the pipes. Anyway good I had it cause after hand tightening the new filter, it was seeping slightly after my test ride. Had to tighten it a bit more with my new oil wrench. Everything is good now. This is my second oil change. First was at 50 miles. This one at 600. Good for a long time now.
 

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http://www.calsci.com/motorcycleinfo/FilterXRef.html This is interesting. Turns out there are not so many different types of filters. The Ninja 300 also fits my Triumph Street Triple and visa versa. Notice that this author who seems to know his filters does not recommend any motorcycle filters. Car filters seem to be made better and come in longer sizes. Scroll down to the bottom where the oil filters that are compatible with our Ninja 300 are listed uner the red (5)and the author recommends the filters highlighted in blue all of which are car filters. I picked up a Bosch filter at Wallys this evening and changed the oil in my Triumph. It's something to keep in mind after your warranty expires if you want to change brands. The Bosch I bought was a D 3323. I think the D stands for Dirt. It's their premium filter. The filter is longer than the oem filters for either the Triumph or the Ninja, but of course that should make it longer lasting and able to trap more dirt. It is made for synthetic oil according to the info on the filter. Something to consider.
 

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Yes, and many, many more. When you look at a cross reference for a motorcycle filter, you get only motorcycle filters of the same length as a rule. However there are car filters and other motorcycle filters that are a little longer than work as well...the guy in the article says better. He also said to stay away from Fram (like nearly everyone else). His recommendation for the Ninja 300 would be: Bosch 3300 and 3323, Purolator Pure One PL4610 and PL4212, and Supertech 6607, in addition to the last 2 on your list. He did not recommend any "motorcycle" filters. Works for me, since I put Rotella T6 oil in my Ninja which is primarily a Truck/Diesel oil. Thing is, your motorcycles doesn't know the difference between filters and oils so long as they do the job well. Apparently there is better filtering material than paper and the filters he recommends used newer and better filtering materials. A longer filter makes some sense too if you believe, as I have read, that in a new bike it is easy to get the filter clogged with metal flakes and the filter stops working altogether and sends all the oil through the bypass after just a few miles of break-in. This is why you change your oil in only 20-50 miles for a hard break-in. The oil itself looks pristine, but look more closely and you see sparkly metal. Presumably, your oil filter is ruined by then.
 

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The filter is longer than the oem filters for either the Triumph or the Ninja, but of course that should make it longer lasting and able to trap more dirt.
Thanks for posting this. I would think the length would have more to do w/increased oil capacity, pumping velocity and cooling, dunno how much more contaminants will be trapped
 
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