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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-18-2019 07:43 PM
Granpooba
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronWarrior View Post
No problem. From what I gather, probably easiest to have him come collect them and take them across the border himself. Contacting the Canada Border Service Agency may be more useful than US Customs, usually no one cares too much about what's going OUT of the country, it's what's coming IN that matters.
Thank you again for your help.

NOW Back to BIKES .
10-18-2019 01:55 PM
IronWarrior No problem. From what I gather, probably easiest to have him come collect them and take them across the border himself. Contacting the Canada Border Service Agency may be more useful than US Customs, usually no one cares too much about what's going OUT of the country, it's what's coming IN that matters.
10-18-2019 10:32 AM
Granpooba
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronWarrior View Post
Firearms can be a very complicated area in Canadian law. I will not pretend to be an expert at all, but based on my very basic understanding, as long as it is not classed as a "restricted" firearm, or prohibited, all he'd need to legally be able to own it is his PAL (Posession and Acquisition Licence, formerly called the FAC, Firarms Acquisition Certificate). If it's restricted (which would include all handguns and many short barreled or short overall shotguns and rifles, among others) he would need the restricted license. Prohibited firearms include modified to be short (think sawed-offs, or cutting the stock off), full autos, or really really short handguns. No licencing will allow you to own prohibited weapons. From what I can tell (again, no expert) engraving, etc. should not be a problem as long as the firearm meets the requirements. See http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/index-eng.htm for more details.

This does not factor in import laws, which I'm sure are extra complicated, hard to read clearly, and will depend on if the CBSA has had his Timmie's yet that morning. Again, quick Googling seems to indicate as long as the weapon is not classed as restricted, and the owner has the appropriate licensing for that class (restricted or non-), there should be no problem. Ref : http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/im-ex-eng.htm

Then there's always the proper storage and transport laws. http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/f...posage-eng.htm

Again, not an expert, and I'm sure a grumpy CBSA would just love to find a problem with a customized weapon (I gather it's mostly cosmetic customization? Decoration, not function?). Most CBSAs are great people, but just like anything else, you'll find a few grumpy and/or power-trippy people here and there.

We had a pretty amusing experience once coming back home with parts for a kit plane, picked up from a shipping warehouse in Maine and crossed back into Canada through New Brunswick. The poor border agent had never had someone try and cross back into Canada with a van loaded full of plane parts for personal use. Of course, the crates were basically filled with sheet metal and extrusions as it was a very "build it yourself" type of kit, but his face when we tried to explain we drove down to Maine for the weekend to bring back airplane parts for the plane we were building in our basement was priceless. No hassle, though, just a little extra delay as he had to call his supervisor to see how to handle it.
Thank you for your input and advise.

The firearms in question are basically hunting firearms. But highly visually customized. Function , parts, actions have not been modified.

I have briefly chatted with some US Customs officers and after chatting with them about shipping, I felt somewhat discouraged.Will most likely pursue this subject again within the near future.

Once again .......... Thank you ............
10-18-2019 10:14 AM
jkv45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Granpooba View Post
NOTE : The firearms are in NO WAY ...... ASSAULT type firearms. But heavily engraved with custom stocks.
Just to clarify -

That's a made-up term anyway. Really shouldn't matter.

This young lady nails it -


Don't buy into the media BS.
10-18-2019 09:04 AM
IronWarrior
Quote:
Originally Posted by Granpooba View Post
I also have some firearms that I would like to give to my son, who also lives in Quebec.
Firearms can be a very complicated area in Canadian law. I will not pretend to be an expert at all, but based on my very basic understanding, as long as it is not classed as a "restricted" firearm, or prohibited, all he'd need to legally be able to own it is his PAL (Posession and Acquisition Licence, formerly called the FAC, Firarms Acquisition Certificate). If it's restricted (which would include all handguns and many short barreled or short overall shotguns and rifles, among others) he would need the restricted license. Prohibited firearms include modified to be short (think sawed-offs, or cutting the stock off), full autos, or really really short handguns. No licencing will allow you to own prohibited weapons. From what I can tell (again, no expert) engraving, etc. should not be a problem as long as the firearm meets the requirements. See http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/index-eng.htm for more details.

This does not factor in import laws, which I'm sure are extra complicated, hard to read clearly, and will depend on if the CBSA has had his Timmie's yet that morning. Again, quick Googling seems to indicate as long as the weapon is not classed as restricted, and the owner has the appropriate licensing for that class (restricted or non-), there should be no problem. Ref : http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/faq/im-ex-eng.htm

Then there's always the proper storage and transport laws. http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/f...posage-eng.htm

Again, not an expert, and I'm sure a grumpy CBSA would just love to find a problem with a customized weapon (I gather it's mostly cosmetic customization? Decoration, not function?). Most CBSAs are great people, but just like anything else, you'll find a few grumpy and/or power-trippy people here and there.

We had a pretty amusing experience once coming back home with parts for a kit plane, picked up from a shipping warehouse in Maine and crossed back into Canada through New Brunswick. The poor border agent had never had someone try and cross back into Canada with a van loaded full of plane parts for personal use. Of course, the crates were basically filled with sheet metal and extrusions as it was a very "build it yourself" type of kit, but his face when we tried to explain we drove down to Maine for the weekend to bring back airplane parts for the plane we were building in our basement was priceless. No hassle, though, just a little extra delay as he had to call his supervisor to see how to handle it.
10-17-2019 06:53 PM
Granpooba
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronWarrior View Post
Oh, I'm sure my son (almost 1 year old now) will eventually inherit the 300. On the condition I can still ride it when I want, of course!

You could always take a trip up to QC and "forget" the bike there...
I have thought / considered many times about just " forgetting " things in Canada. But then how does the problem of ownership / registration / insurance get resolved.

I also have some firearms that I would like to give to my son, who also lives in Quebec. One firearm was custom made to the point where people can not appraise a value. Have taken it many times to firearm experts and none of them could come up with a dollar value.

But then we once again have a problem, which is taking the firearms into Canada as a gift for my son. I am sure the Canadian government would love to confiscate them and keep them for themselves.

I have thought about giving them to him while he is visiting here in the USA. But will have to inquire as to whether or not he will have a problem, when entering back into Canada.

NOTE : The firearms are in NO WAY ...... ASSAULT type firearms. But heavily engraved with custom stocks.
10-17-2019 02:40 PM
IronWarrior
Quote:
Originally Posted by Granpooba View Post
I " might " someday sell my Yamaha V-Star 950. But as far as my 300 is concerned. The worst I may do with it is to hand it down to my Son or Grandson, thus KEEPING it in the family.

Grand Daughter does not like motorcycles. Besides she lives in Quebec and try giving something away in a foreign country.
Oh, I'm sure my son (almost 1 year old now) will eventually inherit the 300. On the condition I can still ride it when I want, of course!

You could always take a trip up to QC and "forget" the bike there...
10-17-2019 01:50 PM
Granpooba
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronWarrior View Post
The 300 is definitely a great bike for a beginner. It is also a great bike, full stop.
My Ninja is not my first bike, and I have about 10 years of riding experience (not a huge amount, but I think it's safe to say I'm no beginner) and I still love my 300. I will not be getting rid of it any time soon. I can wind the crap out of it while still remaining within the confines of the law, and she will take all the abuse I give her and keep on ticking. The power of a 600 would either land me in the hospital, morgue, or jail, or I'd never use half of the available power (which you pay for) so the value on a bigger bike just isn't there for me. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have a 200hp speed demon, I just wouldn't get as much out of it as I'm getting with my much much more cost-effective 300. Maybe some day I'll add a fancy fast bike to my stable, but I won't be trading my 300 or my Honda NC700 in for it.
I " might " someday sell my Yamaha V-Star 950. But as far as my 300 is concerned. The worst I may do with it is to hand it down to my Son or Grandson, thus KEEPING it in the family.

Grand Daughter does not like motorcycles. Besides she lives in Quebec and try giving something away in a foreign country.
10-17-2019 09:03 AM
IronWarrior The 300 is definitely a great bike for a beginner. It is also a great bike, full stop.
My Ninja is not my first bike, and I have about 10 years of riding experience (not a huge amount, but I think it's safe to say I'm no beginner) and I still love my 300. I will not be getting rid of it any time soon. I can wind the crap out of it while still remaining within the confines of the law, and she will take all the abuse I give her and keep on ticking. The power of a 600 would either land me in the hospital, morgue, or jail, or I'd never use half of the available power (which you pay for) so the value on a bigger bike just isn't there for me. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to have a 200hp speed demon, I just wouldn't get as much out of it as I'm getting with my much much more cost-effective 300. Maybe some day I'll add a fancy fast bike to my stable, but I won't be trading my 300 or my Honda NC700 in for it.
10-16-2019 03:25 PM
SparkyMJ I agree, it has taught me well as a first bike. I would say I am decently mechanically inclined, decently skilled at generally "driving" vehicles, and know how to drive a manual, so learning to ride I didn't have to think about or learn about what a clutch does, when it has to be pulled in or not, what actually happens when you change gears, ect. So I was learning muscle memory skills, and finesse and control almost exclusively, and the 300 was a great bike to learn fine clutch control, tight maneuvering, as well as learning all 4 ways to shift (accelerating and decelerating, up and down) and getting used to using all the bikes power when I want it.

I have gone into the real aggressive type of riding, and track riding, and the 300 was an excellent gateway into that scene. It's also great for just learning to become a good rider and gaining excellent road strategy skills as well.

It gets great mileage, generally doesn't eat any oil, maintenance jobs are easy enough to learn to do them like I did, and overall takes a hell of a beating if you take care of it. I would *highly* recommend you learn to do the basic maintenance jobs on the 300 or something similar, they are very friendly to learn, and you'll save a ton of money. The service manuals are available free online, and you don't need a ton of tools to change the oil, change the coolant, change the brake fluid or pads, change the chain/sprockets, adjust the head bearing tension, chain tension/alignment, spark plugs, and even a valve clearance job can be done at home easily.

Even on top of that, insurance is cheap. Im a 20 year old kid with less than a year of riding experience, and the premium is very respectable, ask your insurance provider what the costs look like.

The 300 was just enough power for me to start getting into trouble if I let things get out of hand in the twisties, but not too much to make me crash. I am 100% certain that if I had anything faster, I would have crashed already a few times. But, I ride as hard as I can, and am out there to better myself and learn to be a faster rider, and the 300 is a perfect bike to learn cornering skills and improve quickly. Last month I went to the track and I was able to get my knee down plenty, learn from the coaches how to improve, and I feel like the 300 was a excellent tool to get me to where I am now, in such a short time. Now I ride with the 600s and 1000s in my area when we go to the twisties, and I am plenty fast to keep up those corners!

Just find a new one or one in great shape, these machines are often beat to hell, so buy carefully. The new ninja 400 is only 5k brand new, and although maybe a little more power and lighter, it's also good, just be careful with it. It'll get up to 120 pretty easily, where the 300 only gets to 105-115 depending on your weight and gearing.

Hope this helps.
-Mike
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