New from Pakistan - Kawasaki Ninja 300 Forum
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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 03:59 AM Thread Starter
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Talking New from Pakistan

Hi folks

Just got my Red colored Ninja 300 Non-ABS version imported from Canada yesterday. The bike is amazing

Had a scare with the braking today at about 30 kph whereby the bike fishtailed by sudden braking. Got me a bit scared to be honest. Time to change the stock tires? will that make a difference ?
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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 08:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twystron78 View Post
Hi folks

Just got my Red colored Ninja 300 Non-ABS version imported from Canada yesterday. The bike is amazing

Had a scare with the braking today at about 30 kph whereby the bike fishtailed by sudden braking. Got me a bit scared to be honest. Time to change the stock tires? will that make a difference ?
What'll make the difference? Quite honestly it's going to be learning to ride. I don't know what kind of road you were on, what shape it was in or anything like that but I do know 30 kph is quite slow and if you fishtailing when trying to stop then you're probably way too hard on the rear brake. That's something you need to work on while learning to ride this bike, no tire is going to fix that problem.
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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 09:54 AM
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That's happened to me before on my Non-ABS. you just gotta learn how to use engine brake and not slam on the rear brake. The rear tire locks up easily on this thing. Since I had my scare, I've not had an issue now that I use engine brake more.
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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 12:00 PM
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Welcome to the forum, good luck with your bike. Good quality tires help lots of things, nothing helps a locked rear wheel though. Front brakes are your friend. The rear brake should be used with the sense of an egg shell that shouldn't be broken between your foot and the brake pedal.
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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-14-2016, 02:46 PM
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Welcome and congrats on the new bike.

As others have suggested, changing tires won't make much of a difference on the rear locking up and fishtailing. Practice will be your best solution - just spend time getting to know your bike.

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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-15-2016, 03:59 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the responses folks

Thank u so much for the replies folks. And you guys are right, specially about the judicious use of the rear brake. I went for a ride again today and experimented with the front brake and the engine braking to stop and what a difference it makes. Guess I better take it slow for a while

and as for the braking incident from yesterday, well the road was as good as it comes !! it was just my faulty braking technique. I am used to those little 100 cc ones Sad but true... so the same braking bias of the front and the rear ones does not work at all here.

another thing that I am getting used to is the gear sequencing. All the bikes here on the roads (which typically range from 70 to 125 ccs) have a different gear sequence, which I have ridden all my life (I am 35 yrs old.. so b ad habits are hard to break). It is toe tapping down for gears up and heel tapping back for gears down... so it is totally inverted for me but im getting there.

Still afraid like hell to lean.... but we will cross that bridge when we get there.

Glad you folks liked the pics that I put up.

Cheers
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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-15-2016, 04:51 AM Thread Starter
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Welcome to the forum, good luck with your bike. Good quality tires help lots of things, nothing helps a locked rear wheel though. Front brakes are your friend. The rear brake should be used with the sense of an egg shell that shouldn't be broken between your foot and the brake pedal.
Eggshell treatment it is then !!
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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-15-2016, 02:29 PM
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Welcome!

The rear brake caliper on the 300 is identical to the front. So the front is underpowered and the rear overpowered. When I need to stop NOW it's 100% front brake for me. On a short wheelbase bike like this, maximum (threshold) braking means the rear tire is floating just above the ground. Watch how the MotoGP guys do it.

For the most part, the rear brake can be safely ignored. The rear is really only useful when performing very low-speed maneuvers. Lightly dragging the rear brake will help stabilize the bike, e.g. when performing a U-turn. And at times I will use it to flash the brake light once I'm already stopped at an intersection.. make sure the cars behind don't rear end me.

Now this doesn't mean you should go out and grab a handful of front brake, on cold tires no less. Apply pressure progressively, allowing the weight/traction to shift to the front contact patch as you squeeze the lever harder and harder. With some practice at threshold braking (and some minor suspension upgrades, esp. fork oil viscosity and height) you'll be amazed how confidently this little bike can brake.
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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-16-2016, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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Tried out the bike and my riding skills today

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Originally Posted by UAV View Post
Welcome!

The rear brake caliper on the 300 is identical to the front. So the front is underpowered and the rear overpowered. When I need to stop NOW it's 100% front brake for me. On a short wheelbase bike like this, maximum (threshold) braking means the rear tire is floating just above the ground. Watch how the MotoGP guys do it.

For the most part, the rear brake can be safely ignored. The rear is really only useful when performing very low-speed maneuvers. Lightly dragging the rear brake will help stabilize the bike, e.g. when performing a U-turn. And at times I will use it to flash the brake light once I'm already stopped at an intersection.. make sure the cars behind don't rear end me.

Now this doesn't mean you should go out and grab a handful of front brake, on cold tires no less. Apply pressure progressively, allowing the weight/traction to shift to the front contact patch as you squeeze the lever harder and harder. With some practice at threshold braking (and some minor suspension upgrades, esp. fork oil viscosity and height) you'll be amazed how confidently this little bike can brake.
Thanks bro. I took the bike for a spin and totally avoided the rear brakes like a plague at high speeds. and thanks to all the advice that i got from you guys... it was amazing how the bike responds to a combination of engine braking as well as application of front brake. tried the front braking limit which doesn't cause locking and i reckon i'm at a pretty good riding rhythm now.

im an avionics engineer... so looked up a lot of technical stuff related to the bike engineer's curiosity. but nothing beats hands on experience at controlling it. took the bike for a straight line speed of 160 kph at a runway an abandoned section of course.... overall it is an amazing little machine. the bike still wanted to run faster but my newbie courage ran out !!

Profound gratitude for taking the time to comment in such detail UAV !!! Much appreciated
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 11-16-2016, 01:57 PM
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Glad to help. I was a beginner not that long ago, and there's a staggering amount of disinformation out there to overcome. Part of the reason I didn't start riding sooner..

There's a great book out there called Proficient Motorcycling.. really crystallizes the pitfalls of riding a motorcycle on public roads. Some details may seem counter-intuitive at first, but there really aren't any revolutionary ideas in it.. nothing that you or I wouldn't also conclude after a thorough analysis of the problem. David L. Hough just did the damn thing. Applying a great deal of experience as a motorcycle commuter, of course. Anyway, I found it helpful.
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